Definition of Classico in English:

Classico

adjective

  • [postpositive] Used in the classification of Italian wines to designate a wine produced in the region from which the type takes its name.

    ‘Chianti Classico’
    • ‘We ordered a bottle of white wine, an Orvieto Classico, which at £9.95 was pricier than the house white, but worth the extra couple of quid.’
    • ‘To accompany these we drank a Barolo Classico 2000, which was decanted at the table.’
    • ‘Once these standards are met, the wine can be called Chianti Classico, and wear the seal of the Consortium.’
    • ‘When Tuscany was being carved up everyone wanted to be in the Chianti or Chianti Classico region, as this was the best selling and most well regarded of Italian wines.’
    • ‘Soave Classico and Valpolicella Classico come from the superior hillside vineyards and are usually far removed from the expressionless versions made from grapes grown on the valley floor.’
    • ‘Oils produced in the Chianti Classico region of Tuscany have a new label of distinction: a black rooster, also seen on wine labels.’
    • ‘To the northwest of the city is the Valpolicella Classico zone where most of the best vineyards are located.’
    • ‘It looked just like Orvieto Classico and tasted of nearly nothing.’
    • ‘The Chianti Classico wines have led the trend in richer and better-balanced wines.’
    • ‘But I also like the idea of heading straight for a Chianti Classico, made in the province of Tuscany from Sangiovese grapes.’
    • ‘We stuck with the Chianti Classico, which went well with all our pasta dishes.’
    • ‘A waitress finally took our order and then we waited an age for a bottle of Verdicchio Classico at €15.’
    • ‘Sensing a losing battle, they began to study maps and guidebooks over a shared bottle of Chianti Classico.’

Origin

Italian.

Pronunciation:

Classico

/ˈklasikō/