Definition of Calliope in English:

Calliope

proper noun

Greek Roman Mythology
  • The Muse of epic poetry.

Origin

From Greek Kalliopē, literally having a beautiful voice.

Pronunciation:

Calliope

/kəˈlīəpē/

Definition of calliope in English:

calliope

noun

historical
  • A keyboard instrument resembling an organ but with the notes produced by steam whistles, used chiefly on showboats and in traveling fairs.

    • ‘It serenely drifts through the subdued moments accompanied by yet another diverting calliope!’
    • ‘The track opens with a series of agitated sci-fi effects, homely robot tones that later segue into what sounds like the malfunctioning calliope of a downtrodden circus.’
    • ‘Marimba, clarinet and calliope all figure heavily.’
    • ‘When the kid found out we were going to leave him at home he started up a howl like a calliope and fastened himself as tight as a leech to Bill's leg.’
    • ‘Now, at 8: 00 a.m., the calliope hauled out of the local museum each year awakens the open-windowed slothful for blocks around.’
    • ‘Its coals fade to black shortly after it starts, but then a scratchy calliope whirs to life, taking it out on a wistful, black and white note.’
    • ‘We didn't even get as far as the authentic Chinese funfair, with the authentic Chinese waltzers and calliope.’
    • ‘Today, he plays ‘Waltz of War, ‘which he recorded using calliope and accordion sounds on the synthesizer.’
    • ‘Our steam calliope was traded to Cleveland for a second baseman.’
    • ‘When the calliope starts playing 'Mack the Knife,' it's time to call the kids inside.’
    • ‘The Astrodome was about right for Bobby Riggs and Billie Jean King - in the distance, a calliope seemed to be playing.’
    • ‘She may pick a topic like steamboat bells and whistles, or wax romantic about the calliope.’
    • ‘On the Mississippi Queen, old-time banjos and a calliope belt out favorites from long ago as passengers explore six decks worth of elegance.’
    • ‘She heard merry-go-round calliopes and Silent Night.’

Origin

Mid 19th century: from the Greek name Kalliopē(see Calliope).

Pronunciation:

calliope

/kəˈlīəpē/