Definition of CS gas in English:

CS gas

noun

  • A powerful form of tear gas used particularly in the control of riots.

    • ‘Twenty-four police officers in riot gear using CS gas, five of them injured, nineteen people arrested, three pubs closed, traffic backed up for miles.’
    • ‘Across the county knives and other offensive weapons such as CS gas or pepper sprays, which are prohibited under firearms legislation, are also included in the amnesty.’
    • ‘One witness said police told him not to walk down Park Road as the air was filled with CS gas.’
    • ‘Finally, the use of CS gas will aid in the dispersal of an unruly mob without causing any permanent damage.’
    • ‘Some rubber bullets were fired, followed by CS gas.’
    • ‘The court heard how weapons confiscated from the gang included a sword, knives of various sizes along with a small axe, CS gas, nunchucks and a baseball bat with 50 spikes in it.’
    • ‘A passer-by got involved and started shouting and chasing the three people down the street but as he approached them they sprayed what I believe was CS gas into his face.’
    • ‘Police officers could have triggered a father of five's death from a sudden heart attack three days after they sprayed CS gas in his face, an inquest heard.’
    • ‘An Army sergeant accused of smuggling CS gas into Britain claimed it was to be used to train recruits against nuclear, biological and chemical attack, a court heard yesterday.’
    • ‘All forces now have similar units (under various names), trained in riot control, use of firearms and sometimes CS gas.’
    • ‘As the policeman leaped out of his car, the man raised the hammer above the girl's head but the quick-thinking officer managed to spray CS gas in his face, causing him to release the girl instantly.’
    • ‘The operation resulted in 11 people being charged with conspiracy to supply drugs, and a large amount of cash, vehicles, weapons, drugs and CS gas were recovered.’
    • ‘In her complaint, she says her husband was pinned to the floor, sprayed with CS gas and handcuffed excessively tightly despite putting up no resistance to being arrested.’
    • ‘Officers will become comfortable using riot gear including shields, CS gas and batons and will work through realistic scenarios learning how to deal with violent individuals and crowds.’
    • ‘Everyone knew and everyone mentioned that a Bangladeshi man had been sprayed with CS gas in a struggle with the police on Sunday, when questioned about a suspicious tax disc.’
    • ‘And the offenders brandished guns and sprayed CS gas into victims' faces and evaded capture by ramming into police cars, injuring officers.’
    • ‘Police used CS gas and made 40 preventative arrests.’
    • ‘Teachers were so concerned that they called police and at one point an officer was forced to threaten to use CS gas to disperse the crowd.’
    • ‘In his capacity as a GP working during the Troubles, he has researched the harmful effects of heavy exposure to CS gas on the local population.’
    • ‘Although no knives were recovered as a result of scanning, arrests were made for people with knives and CS gas by ‘spotter’ officers operating in other parts of town.’

Origin

1960s: from the initials of Ben B. Corson (born 1896) and Roger W. Stoughton (1906–57), the American chemists who discovered the properties of the chemical in 1928.