Main definitions of coo in US English:

: coo1coo2COO3

coo1

verb

[no object]
  • 1(of a pigeon or dove) make a soft murmuring sound.

    ‘ringdoves cooed among the branches’
    • ‘I could hear the pigeons cooing overhead, a constant cacophony of noise that filtered down from the eighth floor.’
    • ‘Though there was still a haze of darkness, he could hear the starting of the pigeons cooing.’
    • ‘Jet-black ravens squawked in the churchyard and storm-grey pigeons cooed in the park.’
    • ‘A mourning dove cooed in the distance, accompanied by the never-ending drone of dragonflies and cicadas in the creek bed hidden behind the tall grass of the field.’
    • ‘Most days she goes to the writer's room, a calm neutral space where doves coo outside.’
    • ‘For a long time your body lies there while the pigeons mill about, cooing to one another.’
    • ‘Bluebells and ‘lords and ladies’ are poking up, and overhead early morning pigeons cooed gently in the trees or cruised the valley.’
    • ‘Even as I tell people about our new garden, an image flashes up of friendly old men bending down over enormous cabbages, their pigeons softly cooing in the loft behind.’
    • ‘In the park the pigeons flap and coo, and a couple of girls wearing pink headscarves rock idly backwards and forwards on the red swings beside the climbing frame.’
    • ‘I thought I would be in the gentle surroundings of my room at home but a strange, dark room greeted me; odd noises of pigeons cooing and taxis screeching and car horns blazing wildly in my ears.’
    • ‘It is peaceful - quiet now except for mourning doves cooing in a nearby mesquite.’
    • ‘Pigeons cooed from the rooftops of buildings, and rats scurried along the floor.’
    • ‘White winged doves coo, and a whiptail lizard scurries across the gravel.’
    • ‘The doves are cooing and wooing and calling for love.’
    • ‘Birds flew through the trees and cooed peacefully from the branches.’
    • ‘He cradled the pigeon in his hands, listening to it coo gently before releasing it into the air.’
    • ‘I say pigeon cooing because Joseph also likes the pigeons and his pigeon won a race last weekend.’
    • ‘As she walked pass the table, the dove flew up to her shoulder, cooing in her ear.’
    • ‘As I sat there, wistfully watching the kids run round me, I scattered some cheesy puffs and cashew nuts for pigeons which descended cooing and flapping to peck among the grit.’
    • ‘You're never sure if the phone's ringing in the distance, someone is moving about in the flat upstairs or a pigeon is cooing outside the window.’
    1. 1.1 (of a person) speak in a soft gentle voice.
      ‘“I knew I could count on you,” she cooed’
      ‘I cruised the room, cooing at toddlers’
      • ‘‘We can call your lawyer and work out the rest of the details this week,’ my mom cooed to the lovely wife.’
      • ‘Ladies were cooing over them but he didn't acknowledge them.’
      • ‘As reporters cooed about a ‘second chance’, only a few hard-hearts were prepared to be realistic.’
      • ‘‘Miss,’ his gentle voice cooed, checking to see if she was awake.’
      • ‘‘My sweet baby,’ I cooed, stroking her tiny arm.’
      • ‘Hopefully, I'll then turn all mushy and gooey as I start cooing, ‘Aw, look at his little hands!’’
      • ‘‘Yes, yes, please do,’ I would coo soothingly, anxious not to disturb his flow.’
      • ‘While Colleen was cooing over his attempts at flowery language, I saw Madison lean over to him.’
      • ‘Minutes later, I was cradling my little baby boy, cooing to him as his mother had left in a huff soon after dropping by.’
      • ‘Hunter cooed to him softly, showing a softer side to his draconic steed than he did to most people.’
      • ‘The rest of the girls grew into precious little flowers that danced across the room, parents cooed and clapped, and everyone forgot that Alicia, the seed, was curled up in the corner.’
      • ‘‘Ah, good,’ the man cooed softly, his voice lowering, becoming more reassuring.’
      • ‘The grand lobby had my grandmother cooing - score some points for me.’
      • ‘As I sit down in my seat, Barbara coos sadly and says to me as she looks at the detention paper in my hands, ‘Now I can't go home with you.’’
      • ‘We've all seen it: a mother crouched on the floor, arms outstretched, cooing to her baby as he lopsidedly plops first one hand, then the other, on the carpet, dragging his chubby knees behind him.’
      • ‘Being petless, I find it hard enough when people start cooing about their cats.’
      • ‘The frail girl cooed in a soft voice that matched her fragile figure.’
      • ‘I mean you should have seen all of those people cooing over me at the bridal shop.’
      • ‘‘You're very fast, the fastest I've seen,’ the lady cooed.’
      • ‘The nurses coo over how healthy and well it looks.’

noun

  • A soft murmuring sound made by a dove or pigeon.

    • ‘Deep within a nest cavity near the top of the tree, the pair's two chicks uttered hoarse coos, begging for food.’
    • ‘It was a mellow sneeze from a nose at peace with itself, contented as the coo of a pigeon.’
    • ‘Wainwright isn't just a sweet songbird; she's the black dove with the weather-beaten coo and has the ability to howl like a seasoned blues singer.’
    • ‘When I hear a soft coo, I look back and see him step out the window.’
    • ‘In the eaves, doves' coos beat the intro over and over.’
    • ‘The small, pigeon-like birds that feed on the ground are called mourning doves because of the sad sound of their coos.’
    • ‘There is a dove who occasionally sits and coos mournfully on the roof, but I don't think he's fixed up.’
    • ‘Deer run here, but nature was subdued - the soft coo of a pigeon, the tracks of a rabbit, the thinnest of the branches bent low and coated thick.’
    • ‘Dogs darted among the crowd with the children, their barks mingling with the yowls of cats in alleys and on rooftops and the coos and flutter of pigeons taking flight.’
    • ‘When compared with the pre-playback period, significant differences were observed in flight numbers for AM coos and for flight latency in nonmodulated coos.’
    • ‘Next time you're out, pay attention to the sound of the doves; you should be able to easily identify the coos of different species.’

Origin

Mid 17th century: imitative.

Pronunciation

coo

/ko͞o//ku/

Main definitions of coo in US English:

: coo1coo2COO3

coo2

exclamation

British
informal
  • Used to express surprise.

    ‘“Coo, ain't it high!” Mary squeaked’

Origin

Early 20th century: imitative.

Pronunciation

coo

/ku//ko͞o/

Main definitions of coo in US English:

: coo1coo2COO3

COO3

noun

  • A chief operations (or operating) officer, a senior executive responsible for managing the day-to-day operations of a company or other institution.

    • ‘She became COO of the organization three years later and inherited the responsibility of managing several branches throughout the region.’
    • ‘I've been an administrative assistant for many Presidents, CFOs, and COOs.’
    • ‘He is a government affairs consultant, and a past president and COO of a banking software consulting firm.’
    • ‘The current COO of BBC Worldwide will be tasked with further establishing the business as a destination for content creators outside the U.S.’
    • ‘I was COO of a successful organic food company.’
    • ‘He took on the role of CFO in 2005 and also became COO in 2008.’
    • ‘For some time there had been rumors that he would be stepping down from his position as COO.’
    • ‘Freer first joined Fox in 1997 and has served as president and before that COO of FOX Sports Networks.’
    • ‘All good CEOs and COOs excel at 10 core leadership competencies, but truly great executives outperform their peers in different ways.’
    • ‘He also spent almost a decade at Toys"R"Us Inc. as its COO.’

Pronunciation

COO

/ˌsēˌōˈō//ˌsiˌoʊˈoʊ/