Definition of Britcom in English:

Britcom

noun

  • A British comedy, especially a television series.

    ‘we went dressed as Edina and Patsy from our favorite Britcom’
    • ‘Season 5 marks a return to form for the wonderfully wicked Britcom.’
    • ‘He said to me recently, "Dad, why is it these (Britcoms) are so much funnier than the ones made here?"’
    • ‘Dropping the gags led to New York, where he's part of the new breed of Britcom that's making waves in the United States.’
    • ‘But even the reviewer can find mirth and consolation, in a bawdy Britcom, or a backyard fight between a raccoon and a cat.’
    • ‘A highly accessible and incredibly funny series, it has quickly established itself as one of the best Britcoms of all time.’
    • ‘I'm a huge fan of this wry Britcom's star/co-writer.’
    • ‘It's a charming Britcom that is quite funny for all its faults.’
    • ‘As an American who loves Britcoms, I try to watch and rent all that I can find on telly and in vid shops.’
    • ‘The somewhat muted image exhibits a fair amount of film stock grain but with a warmth many britcoms seem to lack.’
    • ‘Anglophile viewers in American and Australia will get an honest depiction of middle-class life in Britain (for once) without the extremely parochial UK references that work against some other Britcoms.’
    • ‘This "Britcom" was politically incorrect, raucous, uninhibited, extremely physical, and quickly paced.’
    • ‘Overall, this is an enjoyable look at some very talented actresses, and fans of Britcoms will probably enjoy it.’
    • ‘It had been picked up for a second series before the first had officially ended—very unusual for a Britcom.’
    • ‘Likewise, those who are unfamiliar with some of these series will find it a useful introduction to Britcoms they may want to seek out.’
    • ‘It's in Season Two that you begin to see why the show is considered a classic Britcom.’
    • ‘Today, a number of British comedies, or "britcoms," are featured on special programming blocks in many markets.’
    • ‘I prefer Britcoms to sitcoms.’
    • ‘But somebody in the marketing department apparently said, "You know what people who like contemporary high-concept comedies based on Britcoms like?"’
    • ‘Both were American versions of British sitcoms, and since then they've tried to import one Britcom after the other.’
    • ‘It's a Britcom about a dentist and his family.’

Origin

1970s: on the pattern of sitcom.

Pronunciation:

Britcom

/ˈbritˌkäm/