Main definitions of barbie in English

: barbie1Barbie2

barbie1

noun

NZ, Australian
informal
  • A barbecue.

    • ‘Then off to the barbie stopping to grab some snags and a loaf of cheap bread.’
    • ‘But this Christmas it's not all about throwing a few prawns on the barbie.’
    • ‘The nomination fee is $25, which includes a barbie, plus heaps of prizes to be won.’
    • ‘If you haven't yet attended the barbie of the year you'd better be quick.’
    • ‘What would happen if all my neighbours turned up for a barbie?’
    • ‘Brian stomped back to the barbie and turned the steaks.’
    • ‘I'm reliably informed that they ate… that they threw a few shrimps on the barbie, if you like, some barbecued prawns, an Asian salad, and char grilled beef was had by all.’
    • ‘And toss in a barbie with kangaroo kebabs, plus healthy juices to drink.’
    • ‘I went to a barbie the night she got in the sack with the other side.’
    • ‘Both days will feature a four person ambrose with a shotgun start from midday after a barbie at 11 am.’
    • ‘Hundreds of things signal the rise of summer in Australia - the sound of mosquitoes being zapped on the back veranda, the smell of sausages sizzling on the barbie and the sight of blazing bushfires are a few.’
    • ‘Pack the barbie or primus stove and enjoy the great outdoors.’
    • ‘But the sausages never made it on to the barbie and the salads stayed in the Esky.’
    • ‘It might be along the lines of what a fellow in a tweed coat confided at a barbie some months ago.’
    • ‘The barbecue is now such a part of our culture that, ‘fire up the barbie! ‘has almost become an Australian motto.’’
    • ‘One must remember that the breakfast time of poets is generally around dinner time, thus it began at 6pm, and the odd sausage was seen sizzling on the barbie in the freezing courtyard.’
    • ‘The barbie has traditionally served as the symbol of Australian egalitarianism.’
    • ‘The Gillard came up with an interesting response at her barbie yesterday as follows.’
    • ‘He took to the Kiwi wine like a duck to water and by the time that Frenchman got to the barbie he was wielding a pair of tongs with gusto and flair.’
    • ‘Update 10 am Saturday, change of plans, got a phone call last night, I am having some Friends and Family over for a barbie this evening, I will take my daytrip to Geelong on Sunday - Yeah!’
    outdoor meal, al fresco meal, barbecue
    View synonyms

Origin

1970s: abbreviation.

Pronunciation

barbie

/ˈbärbē//ˈbɑrbi/

Main definitions of barbie in English

: barbie1Barbie2

Barbie2

(also Barbie doll)

noun

trademark
  • 1A doll representing a conventionally attractive young woman.

    • ‘You can tell it has, because in the photo of a young girl and her Barbie doll in Terrorism Survival Guide's article ‘What Do We Tell Our Kids?’’
    • ‘A Barbie doll can be nothing but a Barbie doll, leaving no room for the imagination, while building blocks can become anything you like.’
    • ‘Toys ‘R’ Us is selling a toy building styled on a Barbie doll's house with four rooms including lifelike furniture.’
    • ‘On the plus side, I'd won a Barbie doll and the Barbie doll car to go with it.’
    • ‘The Barbie doll of Ruth Handler's Mattel Toys marked another major change.’
    1. 1.1informal A woman who is attractive in a glossily artificial way and is typically considered to be unintelligent and characterless.
      • ‘I thought you'd be able to look past Annie and her Barbie doll beauty and see what was right in front of you.’
      • ‘What's so bad about a woman whose appearance suggests she's not a Barbie doll, that she can get down and dirty when properly inspired?’
      • ‘How can you look at a Barbie doll caked under layers of makeup and then call her beautiful?’
      • ‘On the show, she's not called Candy, but Kiki, and is played by Loni Anderson, the ageing Barbie doll and former Mrs Burt Reynolds.’
      • ‘She simply never convinced me at all that she was her character; she looked like a Barbie doll stuck in the role.’
      • ‘With the culture awash with Barbie doll ideals of beauty, adolescent girls take a hypercritical look at their developing bodies and judge themselves to be too short, too tall, too fat, too busty, too plain, etc.’
      • ‘Yet here I was, sitting with my idiotic best friend and some blonde Barbie doll.’

Origin

1950s: diminutive of the given name Barbara.

Pronunciation

Barbie

/ˈbärbē//ˈbɑrbi/