Definition of updraught in English:

updraught

(US updraft)

noun

  • An upward current or draught of air.

    • ‘Warm, humid conditions are very favorable for thunderstorm development as strong updrafts feed warm, moist air into thunderstorms.’
    • ‘If the item is lightweight, like a fish or a small frog, it may be caught in a strong storm or a cloud updraft for a long time rising higher until it is thrown out like a hailstone.’
    • ‘The strongest tornadoes form at the edge of the updraft.’
    • ‘In some cases, intense updrafts prevent the rain-cooled air from forming the downdraft.’
    • ‘The large hawks, called Buteos, often drift overhead without flapping their wings while they ride an updraft of warm air, known as a thermal.’
    • ‘‘Fire makes its own weather, with severe updrafts and downdrafts,’ said Wahlberg, noting that the pilots must be particularly familiar with the operation of that aircraft to work fires.’
    • ‘After noting a distinct updraft and some rather severe hail, I was almost certain we were about to be hit by a tornado.’
    • ‘A blonde was scurrying across the parking lot, her hair caught in the updraft of the wind.’
    • ‘The storm surge within a hurricane is typically caused by strong winds pushing the ocean surface ahead of the storm, and not by the massive updraft from within a hurricane.’
    • ‘This probably allows them to take advantage of weather patterns, like thermal updrafts and winds that speed their flight.’
    • ‘‘When there's a windy day, there are lots of updrafts that raptors like to use,’ the biologist said.’
    • ‘It is caused by the tremendous updraft and downdraft winds within the thunderstorm.’
    • ‘It felt like a little turbulence from thermal updrafts, a common occurrence when flying at 1,000 Feet in this area, so I wasn't worried.’
    • ‘In fact, some of the energy that helps create strong updrafts in land thunderstorms goes into creating a hurricane's 74 mph or stronger winds blowing along the ocean and ground.’
    • ‘Hailstones are formed by winds known as updrafts that blow upward in thunderstorms.’
    • ‘Normally, the air that's moving down, called a downdraft, shares the thunderstorm with the updraft.’
    • ‘A strong updraft allows hailstones to grow large enough to reach the ground.’
    • ‘Condors hunt prey mostly by sight, soaring on thermal updrafts and wind currents until they spot a potential meal.’
    • ‘There was a cold draught on the side of my face and I was too occupied to do anything about it.’
    • ‘‘Hailstorms usually happen in spring and summer afternoons when updrafts and downdrafts interact strongly,’ You said.’

Pronunciation:

updraught

/ˈʌpdrɑːft/