preposition

  • 1From a lower to a higher point of (something)

    ‘she climbed up a flight of steps’
    • ‘We picked our way up one side of the ridge, and I found a spot where we could spend the long night ahead.’
    • ‘I don't know where we were, but I wanted to climb up a really steep hill - which seemed to take ages.’
    • ‘She shrieked with laughter as they raced up the stairs.’
    • ‘He was assigned to work as an Inspecteur des Finances at the French Finance Ministry in 1971 and rose up the hierarchy.’
    • ‘She pushed her glasses further up the bridge of her nose.’
    • ‘Calleri is one of several Argentines moving steadily up the rankings.’
    1. 1.1 To a higher part of (a river or stream), away from the sea.
      ‘a cruise up the Rhine’
      • ‘We think it is a realistic proposition to bring a crossing between Kent and Southend, and eventually up the Thames to London.’
      • ‘In 1866 the U.S.S. General Sherman sailed up the Taedong River to Pyongyang.’
      • ‘Last summer I made a trip up the Amazon basin in Peru.’
  • 2Along or further along (a street or road)

    ‘he lived up the road’
    ‘walking up the street’
    • ‘He's done one job for Redwood City, and one for Emeryville that's just a few blocks up Park Avenue from his office.’
    • ‘He was returning from visiting his mother further up Silchester Road when the evacuation began and was unable to get back to his home.’
    • ‘I lived just up the street from them.’
  • 3informal At or to (a place)

    ‘we're going up the Palais’
    • ‘Fancy going up the shops?’
    • ‘Then we went up the pub and stayed there until midnight.’