Definition of unsuspicious in English:

unsuspicious

adjective

  • Not having or showing suspicion.

    ‘she has a caring, unsuspicious nature’
    • ‘Harris was unsuspicious, and in many parts of Australia young poets, painters, and persons attached to the arts were puzzling over the imaginative, sophisticated, but curiously disjointed verses of the late Ern Malley.’
    • ‘Or lack of it: the essay will be dumbed down to unsuspicious levels if the customer so specifies.’
    • ‘A single missing series also might look like a printer's error to the unsuspicious.’
    • ‘He was relieved a minute later when the soldier left after only a cursory check of the room, seeming completely unsuspicious.’
    • ‘If, following Hancock, we say that Australians had a pragmatic, utilitarian, remarkably unsuspicious attitude to the state, this is only in part true.’
    • ‘But the constables, whose visit came on the night before the poll closed, remained remarkably unsuspicious.’
    • ‘They were all trying to look unsuspicious, but ended up standing out even more.’
    • ‘It will be seen that all SUDI are potential SIDS, but further investigation may show it is not a true SIDS, which are unexplained and unsuspicious natural deaths.’
    • ‘The men were now following at a distance, doing their best to look unsuspicious.’
    • ‘The ridiculous overacting left the bureaucrat completely unsuspicious.’
    • ‘The amazing thing about his run was the fact that he had a very unsuspicious start to the run and then, in true postman style, stopped to chat several groups of spectators on the way.’
    • ‘Most were highly unsuspicious and unhelpful in the least.’
    • ‘He is prosecuting attorney, and he suborns him, an unsuspicious and innocent fellow most of the time, into raiding Albert's garbage can for evidence.’
    • ‘Abdi research noted that this form of adaptation demonstrated the African concept of Ubuntu, which describes the African people as trusting and unsuspicious of strangers.’
    • ‘He, learning that she now employs his page, is astonished at her unsuspicious nature.’
    • ‘By aiming to recover a genealogy of such radical epistemology, Herbert's project in effect aims to undergird a hermeneutically suspicious project via unsuspicious historicism.’
    • ‘He wanted to make himself as unsuspicious as possible when his nephew was dead.’

Pronunciation

unsuspicious

/ʌnsəˈspɪʃəs/