Definition of unowned in English:

unowned

adjective

  • 1Not having an owner.

    ‘unowned land’
    • ‘Arguably, a clear and straightforward theory of how an unowned resource comes legitimately to be owned had to wait till Hume's Treatise of Human Nature.’
    • ‘Of the unowned animals, an estimated 40 million are socialized, or comfortable around people; more than 20 million have had no human contact and are wild, or feral.’
    • ‘Disregarded in this analysis, however, is the point made earlier in connection with the right of publicity - the potential congestion cost if valuable property is unowned.’
    • ‘This is acceptable to Nozick since untalented people would have starved anyway had the land remained unowned.’
    • ‘The whole continent is unowned and has no permanent population, and as such it offers a more complete form of escape than anywhere else on the planet.’
    • ‘Lord Romilly's preliminary ruling sent a clear message to all landowners eyeing parcels of seemingly unowned land - commons, wastes, heaths and greens - with intent to develop, exploit or add them to their existing holdings.’
    • ‘This body of unowned material is, like Crown land, water, and air, an essential part of Canada's riches - spiritual and material.’
    • ‘As is the case with any incident within the arena of public or unowned property, be it public goods or public services, the involved parties in the paparazzi-celebrity case face a conflict of interests.’
    • ‘They cross the country as though it were unowned, and the thrill of jumping is not - as so many people imagine - merely an equestrian experience.’
    • ‘The ultimate expression of owned space: the city - where public space has to be labelled as public - reaches such a fine grain because of transaction fluidity that it essentially becomes unowned again.’
    • ‘This scheme is Otsuka's response to Locke's proviso governing the appropriation of unowned resources.’
    • ‘Remember, though, that if you come up with a new agreement, for it to generate value as quickly as the Internet itself did, it needs to be open, unowned, and for everyone.’
    • ‘No fences at all to be seen… no cattle… huge groups of rocks… hundreds of miles of seemingly unowned and uncultivated land.’
    • ‘Second, there are vast unowned areas of the United States; if immigrants enter these, there can be no question of trespass.’
    • ‘Just why, because an individual owns himself and thus that anything he produces means that he also owns ‘previously unowned natural resources,’ that is, owns land, is not clear.’
    • ‘Can I fence off an arbitrarily large area of unowned land and claim it as new property?’
    • ‘Even if their great-grandfathers could still find such unowned pieces of property, it is clear that they have failed to leave ‘enough and as good’ for their descendants.’
    • ‘At this point, our rules for unowned property come into play: namely, that unowned resources become the property of the first people possessing them.’
  • 2Not admitted to; unacknowledged.

Pronunciation

unowned

/ʌnˈəʊnd/