Definition of unmown in English:

unmown

adjective

  • Not mown.

    ‘unmown grass’
    • ‘I wonder why they couldn't just have pulled on to the unmown area - the grass isn't that long?’
    • ‘Hulking like a skeleton, the only house on the street that had an unmown lawn.’
    • ‘It had been calling from a field of unmown hay close to the house for much of the morning and we were sitting at the kitchen table drinking coffee, not really looking for it, but wondering whether, as it was so close, we might get a glimpse.’
    • ‘Too often… village greens are neglected and become rank with unmown grass and weeds, or trodden bare, used as dumps for rubbish and disfigured with litter.’
    • ‘Lawn mowings are left in situ and large areas of longer grass are left unmown to encourage wild flowers and grass seed.’
    • ‘Christian cemeteries tend to be located near churches, and it is common to see weeds and unmown grass there.’
    • ‘The unmown grass could spoil Colchester's reputation as a place to visit, another resident has warned.’
    • ‘We chose a typical northeastern hayfield - habitat that's wonderful for voles but also likely to get rapidly overgrown if left unmown.’
    • ‘When Leila was seven years old, her stepfather ran out of fuel when mowing, leaving a large rectangle of unmown orchard grass.’
    • ‘The unmown grass, the ragged-looking shrubs, that pile of dead limbs and brush behind the poplar: Some would say, as my misinformed neighbors have hinted from time to time, these are symptoms of a good-for-nothing homeowner.’
    • ‘In between blocks, Shinn and Page have established small ‘prairies,’ plots seeded to perennial grasses and forbs and left unmown to serve as habitat for beneficial insects and other wildlife.’
    • ‘Neighbors with patchy or unmown grass were frowned upon, or worse.’

Pronunciation

unmown

/ʌnˈməʊn/