Definition of universalism in English:

universalism

noun

mass noun
  • 1Christian Theology
    The belief that all humankind will eventually be saved.

    ‘Christian universalism would insist that Christ's atonement did atone for everyone's sins’
    • ‘The racism of the conquest narratives is replaced with a Christian universalism, where social divisions are set aside in favour of a common humanity in Christ.’
    • ‘Universalism, a product of the 18th-century Enlightenment, holds that all living beings attain complete salvation.’
    • ‘Universalism in the books of Luke and Acts underscores the certainty that the mission of Jesus and his church are united in the plan of God for the salvation of all nations.’
    • ‘Such avowed Protestants embrace universalism on the grounds that all are condemned in Christ's death but accepted in His resurrection.’
    • ‘Such a vision would support Christians in their military service—especially if the military they serve increasingly approximates the ideal of Christian universalism.’
  • 2Loyalty to and concern for others without regard to national or other allegiances.

    ‘a tendency towards universalism and inclusion’
    • ‘German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche was convinced that universalism had undermined respect for the strong.’
    • ‘With roots going back to 19th-century national objectives, universalism became central to 20th-century Canadian public policy.’
    • ‘Universal access to communications technologies is part of the tradition of universalism.’
    • ‘World music has long been mustered by both camps to provide evidence for new theories, whether they stress cultural relativism or universalism.’
    • ‘As the attention to human rights has increased, so has the criticism, directed particularly at their purported universalism.’

Pronunciation

universalism

/juːnɪˈvəːsəlɪz(ə)m/