Definition of unipolar in English:

unipolar

adjective

  • 1Having or relating to a single pole or kind of polarity.

    ‘a unipolar magnetic charge’
    • ‘Since the end of the Cold War removed the rationale for an anti-communist alliance, the Western powers have tried to legitimise an essentially unipolar, US-dominated world order in the language of humanitarian internationalism.’
    • ‘That is not to say, however, that the new world order is unipolar, in which one unique pole is universally accepted as the unchallenged arbiter of world affairs.’
    • ‘To achieve unipolar charge sensing over the largest possible portion of the detector volume, then, requires the smallest possible strip pitch compared to the thickness of the detector.’
    • ‘The surgeon uses unipolar or bipolar electrosurgery to place a midline anterosuperior mark on the inner perichondrium.’
    • ‘And we will reap a whirlwind if we push the Americans into a unilateralist position in which they are the centre of this unipolar world.’
    • ‘These forms arise when cells are limited for nutrients and bud in a unipolar pattern, spreading through the medium in filamentous arrays.’
    • ‘In the former, cleavage gives rise to a hollow blastula, which is filled in to a greater or lesser extent by the unipolar immigration of cells, much as occurs in hydrozoan cnidarians.’
    • ‘Invasive and pseudohyphal growth is characterized by directional unipolar budding and by cells that remain attached to each other after budding.’
    • ‘It is also likely to become, in geo-strategic terms, the second pole in what has become a unipolar world.’
    • ‘Waltz theorizes that the units in an anarchic system will be profoundly affected by the degree of polarity, and he distinguishes between unipolar, bipolar, and multipolar systems.’
    • ‘In a unipolar world dominated by one sovereign nation-state - since 199o, the United States - the UN could function effectively only when it followed the lead of the United States.’
    • ‘Second, he posited that the world today is ‘a unipolar world dominated by a single superpower unchecked by any rival and with decisive reach in every corner of the globe.’’
    • ‘Indeed, in this implicit foreshortening of it, we were told that ‘America's unipolar moment will not last long ’.’
    • ‘We probably owe this lull to the end of the cold war, and to a unipolar world order with a single superpower to impose its will.’
    • ‘It is merely the latest in a series of clashes as the bipolar (West v East) Cold War institutional framework is reshaped by the pressures of today's unipolar (USA rules) world.’
    • ‘The twin new realities of our age - catastrophic terrorism and American unipolar power - do necessitate a rethinking of the organizing principles of international order.’
    • ‘The Cold War was a bipolar world; the 21st century world is-for the moment, at least-decidedly unipolar, with America as the world's ‘sole superpower.’’
    • ‘The United States is aiming at world leadership and is using the objective globalization processes with which it correlates the trend towards a unipolar world and a corresponding military strategy.’
    • ‘After the collapse of the Soviet Union, some analysts described the resulting world as unipolar and saw few constraints on American power.’
    • ‘Would things be better in a unipolar world and in an era whose operating philosophy is defined by the ‘Clash of Civilizations‘?’
    1. 1.1Electronics (of a transistor or other device) using charge carriers of a single polarity.
      • ‘A unipolar sensor basically acts as an NPN transistor whose base current is on when the device is in the presence of a south magnetic pole.’
      • ‘The scrub person and circulating nurse attach the camera and light source to the thoracoscope and the unipolar and bipolar cords to the electrosurgical unit.’
      • ‘As the majority of commercially available bronchoscopes are not electrically grounded, the bronchoscopist risks becoming the grounding electrode should the unipolar probe tip touch the scope while the current is on.’
  • 2(of psychiatric illness) characterized by either depressive or manic episodes but not both.

    • ‘In sum, then, individual CBT was the most cost-effective option available for the treatment of depression, and was, therefore, recommended by the researchers as the treatment of first choice for dealing with unipolar depression.’
    • ‘Fish oils may be as effective as conventional drugs in alleviating unipolar and bipolar depression, he says.’
    • ‘Of all the mysteries of unipolar depression, a condition marked by sleep problems to begin with, the most clinically useful may be the paradoxical observation that keeping people awake may actually help them get better.’
    • ‘The antidepressant effect of lithium in unipolar depressive illness has been investigated in 14 controlled studies.’
    • ‘It was not expected that youths in the unipolar and bipolar depression groups would be well discriminated by the Depression scale, because both disorders include the symptoms of depression.’
    • ‘However, recent data suggest that a sizable portion of patients with unipolar depression do not experience full therapeutic recovery.’
    • ‘Sleep disturbances and unipolar depression are such intransigent bedfellows that troubled sleep is considered a hallmark of the mood disorder.’
    • ‘The distinction between bipolar versus unipolar depression also has been recognized as difficult in both adults and youth.’
    • ‘‘Some studies have started unipolar patients on 800 mg or 1600 mg per day,’ he said.’
    • ‘However, the combination of both scales was most useful in discriminating bipolar disorders from unipolar depressive disorders.’
    • ‘More than two-thirds of people with bipolar disorder have at least one close relative with the disorder or with unipolar major depression, indicating that the disease has a heritable component.’
    • ‘The book is also limited by restricting the accounts of personal experience of madness to extreme mental states, such as mania and psychosis, and not mental illnesses such as unipolar depression or anxiety disorders.’
    • ‘An additional 5% have severe depressions only sometimes called unipolar disease.’
    • ‘In North America, for example, women are estimated to be between two and four times more likely than men to experience unipolar depression at some point in their lives.’
    • ‘And unlike unipolar depression, the depression of bipolar illness tends to be treatment-resistant.’
    • ‘People will make that claim, and they'll just ignore the fairly large literature that says that it's a vulnerability factor for unipolar depression, anorexia and suicide.’
    • ‘Furthermore, Rush and colleagues, including Sackeim, are studying the use of vagus nerve stimulation, a promising and moderately invasive treatment for refractory unipolar and bipolar depressions.’
    • ‘The World Health Organisation has predicted that by the year 2020 unipolar depression will account for the second largest burden of disease.’
    • ‘Among psychiatric illnesses, bipolar disorder ranks second only to major unipolar depression as a cause of global disability.’
    • ‘They fared significantly worse on the math part of standard academic tests than teens with unipolar depression and those with no psychiatric history.’
  • 3(of a nerve cell) having only one axon or process.

    • ‘Those located in sensory ganglia are unipolar, whereas those in autonomic ganglia are multipolar.’
    • ‘The somas of the sensory fibers in the vagus nerves lie in the ganglion nodosum whose unipolar cells possess a branched process, one branch receiving signals from the gut and the other carrying them on to the brain.’

Pronunciation

unipolar

/juːnɪˈpəʊlə/