Definition of uniform in English:

uniform

adjective

  • 1Remaining the same in all cases and at all times; unchanging in form or character.

    ‘blocks of stone of uniform size’
    • ‘Apples are easier in part because they are more uniform in shape and surface texture than chickens.’
    • ‘However, despite these similarities, the political significance of the extended family was not uniform throughout Wales, Scotland, and Ireland.’
    • ‘However, in terms of standards, they are uniform.’
    • ‘The other actors put in excellent work, but they are as uniform and one-sided as the script.’
    • ‘The lack of uniform methods of identification and the taxonomic diversity of B cepacia complex and related species contributes to this problem.’
    • ‘For our model to be valid, we have to assume that the degree of interconnections is uniform across the cell; otherwise, Den would be a function of position.’
    • ‘Coordinating the activities of the States and advising them on matters relating to uniform administration of the Act and Rules.’
    • ‘He found that the individual strata there change their characteristics laterally: they are not uniform throughout their extent and undergo facies change.’
    • ‘Across 14 channels, it was amazing how uniform the behaviour pattern was.’
    • ‘However, their conclusion hinges on the hidden assumption that the distribution of relatedness of potential mates is uniform or normal.’
    • ‘Parliament has approved changes to the Tourism Act that will compel hotels, restaurants and resorts to charge Bulgarians and foreigners uniform prices.’
    • ‘Their decisions are likely to lack the uniform character which could be achieved by this Court…’
    • ‘Is it healthy to create a uniform personality, a company personality?’
    • ‘But the measuring sticks were not uniform, and across Spain the vara therefore represented different lengths.’
    • ‘Though they are uniform in order, the age of onset, pace, and duration of these changes vary widely from one individual to another.’
    • ‘Since natural objects are not uniform, we can't compare one spot on an object to another spot, but we can find common features among objects in the same class.’
    • ‘Clumps of native bush have given way to uniform rows of trees and contrived water features.’
    • ‘They are uniform in their dismissal of critics as being ‘in denial’.’
    • ‘However, structures do tend to be depicted as if they are uniform.’
    • ‘During the Mid-Eocene the tilting became smoother and more uniform compared with the Early Eocene.’
    constant, consistent, steady, invariable, unvarying, unfluctuating, unvaried, unchanging, unwavering, undeviating, stable, static, sustained, regular, fixed, even, equal, equable, monotonous
    identical, matching, similar, equal
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Of a similar form or character to another or others.
      ‘a uniform package of amenities at a choice of hotels’
      • ‘We studied the referral rates for dermatology across the 16 practices in a primary care group with a comparatively uniform population mix.’
      • ‘It has its own cultural characteristics - not uniform, not homogenous, but they're distinct.’
      • ‘They are uniform and polygonal with a bland, oval or round nucleus.’
      • ‘These are just beautiful, and more importantly, they're highly uniform.’
      • ‘An agreement was reached to stick a uniform identifier on their products.’
      • ‘Nutritionists are surprisingly uniform in identifying the ingredients we should be wary of.’
      • ‘During that process, bottles are heated and cooled to strengthen and preshrink them, and to create uniform packages.’
      • ‘Without uniform definitions, comparison of the various studies is difficult at best.’
      • ‘In their missions, programs and courses, they are remarkably uniform.’
      • ‘Chevy vehicles already are sold in more than 40 countries but that includes other products sold under a Chevy badge and the brand identity is not uniform.’
      • ‘In all measurements, a completely uniform and homogeneous image was obtained.’
      • ‘They're so uniform, you can tell they almost all come from one maker.’
      • ‘It'll take about a year to get the packages totally uniform across the country, says SVP-marketing Doug Seserman.’
      • ‘It was of special importance that staff in each section be counted in a uniform manner to ensure comparability of results.’
      • ‘This said, the profile of the customers is not uniform as can be revealed with a homogeneity analysis.’
      • ‘This time was chosen so that the experiences of the sample could be compared at one uniform point for all variables in all subgroups.’
      • ‘There are plenty who prefer the safer option, purchasing uniform garments manufactured by the chain stores that line the streets of London and Britain as a whole.’
      • ‘Note that the observed distribution is quite uniform compared to the distribution expected under neutrality.’
      • ‘However, they are not uniform, either across food commodities or within a particular food commodity.’
      • ‘The measure requires states to start issuing more uniform driver's licenses and to verify the citizenship or legal status of people getting them.’
      identical, similar, alike, the same, exactly the same, indistinguishable, twin, undifferentiated, homogeneous, of a piece, cut from the same cloth
      View synonyms
  • 2Denoting a garment forming part of a person's uniform.

    ‘black uniform jackets’
    • ‘Coughlin then made Michael an honorary lifetime crewmember by giving him an autographed and signed team uniform shirt.’
    • ‘The chief looked at Eric's uniform shirt in disgust.’
    • ‘The pensioners wear a distinctive three-quarter length uniform coat, navy blue in winter and scarlet in the summer, which dates from the 18th century.’
    • ‘On the porch was a pizza delivery driver, the red-and-blue uniform shirt and cap unmistakable, his head bent as he peered at the ticket he held atop the warming bag.’
    • ‘She changed out of her pajamas and then pulled on her work clothes (a pair of old jeans and her uniform shirt).’
    • ‘Alita had slipped a few of her fingers over the hem of my uniform shirt.’
    • ‘I changed into the shirt I wore earlier that day, shoved my uniform shirt into my backpack, shut the locker and walked back out.’
    • ‘Now we have a batch of purloined clear plastic buttons, ready to sew on his shiny uniform shirt.’
    • ‘He is thought to be the only police officer who wears a dog collar on duty and has a specially-designed uniform shirt to prove the point.’
    • ‘These knives can be clipped to a waistband, an inside coat pocket, an equipment bag, a boot and in the case of a really small folder, even to the collar of a uniform shirt.’
    • ‘I quickly change into the uniform shirt front-end assistant manager Patrick loaned me; I didn't want to wear it out on the street.’
    • ‘Those uniform shirts looked as though they were from the Civil War, being Navy Blue and Gold striped arms.’
    • ‘Anji got out a clean uniform shirt, and took it off the hanger.’
    • ‘I was slightly paranoid about sheer shirts of any kind, so I wore a camisole under the uniform shirt.’
    • ‘One day I chose to place my card inside the folded left sleeve of my battle dress uniform shirt.’
    • ‘When it was over last night, though, he was a kid again, running in from left field, hair flying, tugging his uniform shirt out of his pants.’
    • ‘She opened his charred shirt to see that he had trumpets, a Fire Captain's insignia, on the lapel of his white uniform shirt.’
    • ‘He also wanted to wear his clerical collar on duty so had to have a specially-designed uniform shirt to accommodate it.’
    • ‘Once he had his jacket and uniform shirt taken off, he sat down on his bed.’
    • ‘He pulled off his uniform shirt and put the t-shirt on.’

noun

  • 1The distinctive clothing worn by members of the same organization or body or by children attending certain schools.

    ‘airline pilots in dark blue uniforms’
    mass noun ‘an officer in uniform’
    • ‘The review also acknowledged serious problems with the supply of equipment to troops in the front line, including uniforms, body armour and desert boots.’
    • ‘It managed a multitude of critical supply requirements, including desert camouflage uniforms and body armor for deploying soldiers.’
    • ‘Along with olive drab uniforms and combat boots, these could go to everyone upon enlistment.’
    • ‘Deductions are allowable for the cost of laundering and dry cleaning of uniforms and protective clothing.’
    • ‘All village court members are supposed to be issued with a uniform of blue shirt and trousers and fabric badges of office.’
    • ‘You are doomed to wear whatever uniform your school decides.’
    • ‘In addition to suits, the new coating could be applied to hospital garments, sportswear, military uniforms and rain coats.’
    • ‘Military clothing and military footwear are called uniforms.’
    • ‘When I'm wearing my UCLA uniform, I'm extremely proud to represent my university.’
    • ‘As the Forces were mostly civilians in uniform this should cause no surprise.’
    • ‘That meant that many fewer bodies available to put uniforms on.’
    • ‘Glancing behind me, I saw the ground littered with bodies, the blue uniforms darkened by blood.’
    • ‘She is wearing her school uniform of dark blue blazer, grey skirt, white shirt, school tie and blue jumper.’
    • ‘Until the 1950s Cossart Gordon workers wore a distinctive uniform of blue drill suits with a bright red cap.’
    • ‘It also manages the Navy's clothing program, providing both uniforms and specialized protective clothing to the Navy.’
    • ‘He too will be in the same uniform every night I see him.’
    • ‘A cricket board can sell the logo on a player's uniform because the player is representing it while playing a match, but when he is off the field, in his private domain, the board has no claim on him.’
    • ‘At the time the footage was taken she was wearing her uniform of dark blue blazer, grey skirt, white shirt, school tie and blue jumper.’
    • ‘Its members were given German uniforms and equipment though some continued to wear their blue shirts.’
    • ‘And I'm really curious about what kind of secret lives they have behind these really dark blue uniforms with all these chest protectors.’
    costume, livery, regalia, habit, suit, dress, garb, attire, ensemble, outfit
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1North American informal A police officer wearing a uniform.
      ‘uniforms were already on the scene’
  • 2A code word representing the letter U, used in radio communication.

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Make uniform.

Origin

Mid 16th century (as an adjective): from French uniforme or Latin uniformis (see uni-, form). Sense 1 of the noun dates from the mid 18th century.

Pronunciation

uniform

/ˈjuːnɪfɔːm/