Definition of ungallant in English:

ungallant

adjective

  • Not gallant.

    ‘he was an ungallant swine for not coming to her aid’
    • ‘Critics complained that it was not so much autobiographical as it was confessional - and not a few thought he was ungallant in the extreme for sharing.’
    • ‘It seems almost ungallant to say this now, since she is being so pleasant and open, but I recall meeting her 10 years ago on the set of Shadowlands, when she insisted on doing her interview standing up and in the open air.’
    • ‘One might think this ungallant of him, but the simple truth was, Jake didn't know how to drive - let alone change a tyre.’
    • ‘She establishes beyond doubt that he was a conceited careerist and ungallant husband, but doesn't necessarily prove that his work was ‘kitsch’ and ‘trash’.’
    • ‘At one point, when it was just me and her and I had nothing I thought about betting big and bluffing her out, but decided that that would be ungallant on a first date.’
    • ‘We refuse to rise to this slur on reputations of the likes of her and other undomestic goddesses; suffice to say that the ungallant man should be so lucky.’
    • ‘Neither gentleman is ungallant enough to so much as hint when discussing her performance that her voice has been dubbed.’
    • ‘We can't abide the suggestion ourselves, and we urge him to do the honourable thing and withdraw this ungallant insinuation forthwith, preferably before somebody's lawyers hear of it.’
    • ‘You would not be so ungallant as to refuse our hospitality.’
    • ‘I think it is probably polite just to ignore Mr Jowett's rather ungallant assertion that I am naïve and his suggestion that I am a hypocrite.’
    uncivilized, uncultured, uncultivated, unrefined, unpolished, unsophisticated, common, low, plebeian, philistine, rough, coarse, provincial, rustic, crude, gross, loutish, hooligan, boorish, oafish
    View synonyms

Pronunciation:

ungallant

/ʌnˈɡal(ə)nt//ʌnɡəˈlant/