Definition of undoable in English:

undoable

adjective

informal
  • Unable to be done; impracticable:

    ‘some wild request that's almost undoable’
    ‘one man is daring to do the undoable’
    • ‘The postwar task here, while difficult, is neither undoable, nor is it something at which we can afford to fail.’
    • ‘There are all kind of analysts and experts calling this undoable.’
    • ‘The designer did the undoable by creating a dress that lived up to an impossible dream.’
    • ‘Basically, what I think would be a great series is undoable, unmarketable and lacks wide appeal.’
    • ‘It's a job that used to be considered undoable because the recycling technology just wasn't there.’
    • ‘He boasts of bringing the federal budget into balance - an achievement once seen as undoable.’
    • ‘Any new work that gets thrown my way doesn't cause me any more problems, but remains just as undoable as the last five or six tasks I've been given to juggle.’
    • ‘The clown is the character who engages our sympathies, who speaks for us, who says and does the unspeakable, the undoable - and, in doing so, becomes a lightning rod for our emotions.’
    • ‘Parliament's decision to do the undoable heralds an unprecedented crisis for the Government.’
    • ‘I don't think this is as undoable as people have suggested.’
    • ‘The negotiators found the task undoable.’
    • ‘My job was fundamentally undoable.’
    • ‘Enriching uranium is harder, but still not undoable.’
    • ‘After Florida 2000, voting reforms that seemed undoable suddenly seem doable.’
    • ‘It is not hopeless, it is not undoable, we have only to marshal the will to start paying attention.’
    • ‘We have to admit that you sound genuine, but what you tell us to do is just undoable.’
    not possible, beyond the bounds of possibility, out of the question, not worth considering
    View synonyms

Pronunciation:

undoable

/ʌnˈduːəb(ə)l/