Definition of underestimate in English:

underestimate

verb

[with object]
Pronunciation /ʌndərˈɛstɪmeɪt/
  • 1Estimate (something) to be smaller or less important than it really is.

    ‘the government has grossly underestimated the extent of the problem’
    • ‘The last five years, the government has been grossly underestimating its revenue, steadily.’
    • ‘Some of the author's analysis is rather basic but there are also some important insights, although the author on occasion underestimates their significance.’
    • ‘Stefan said the team was not underestimating the importance of preparation.’
    • ‘She said it was important not to underestimate the impact of binge drinking - particularly among young women.’
    • ‘I think there is a real risk that the Administration underestimates the difficulties.’
    • ‘I think I seriously underestimate the extent to which our society's addictions drive the actions of our citizens.’
    • ‘However, I would also add that one should not underestimate the importance of the influence of the editor in getting ideas signed off.’
    • ‘Most important of all; never underestimate the necessity to save up for your retirement.’
    • ‘He believes they are grossly underestimating the impact of growth on their infrastructure.’
    • ‘Therefore it is important not to underestimate the replacement value of everything inside your house that is not fixed to the walls.’
    • ‘For a start, many people grossly underestimate the time their project will take and, as a result, jobs either don't get completed or are rushed.’
    • ‘Comedy aside, don't underestimate the seriousness with which these people take their tasks.’
    • ‘Businesses grossly underestimate the spending power of disabled people, says the commission.’
    • ‘This grossly underestimates the fixed costs involved in running a CD manufacturing plant.’
    • ‘The majority of people grossly underestimate the effort required to earn a certification.’
    • ‘Ontario universities underestimated the extent of this growth in demand and thence enrolment.’
    • ‘Earlier estimates may simply have underestimated the true cost.’
    • ‘The findings suggest that official estimates based on surveys of the public significantly underestimate the extent of alcohol abuse in the country.’
    • ‘I think so, and I think we're underestimating the importance of this.’
    • ‘I fear that you're underestimating the size and importance of that segment.’
    set too low, underrate
    underrate, rate too low, undervalue, set little store by, set no store by, not do justice to, do an injustice to, be wrong about, sell short, play down, understate
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Regard (someone) as less capable than they really are.
      ‘he had underestimated the new President’
      • ‘The president made a mistake in underestimating me.’
      • ‘I wish people wouldn't underestimate me, or my strength, or my weakness.’
      • ‘My father had always underestimated him, always mistaken his kind nature for weakness.’
      • ‘Even after his landslide election victory last year, they continue to underestimate him.’
      • ‘Although perhaps I'm underestimating her - perhaps she has this effect on everyone.’
      • ‘I mean, the people who underestimate him are the same people who underestimated the former mayor.’
      • ‘In fact, he'd already decided this was one woman who did her best to make people underestimate her.’
      • ‘People who worked for Casey soon learned to underestimate him at their own peril.’
      • ‘If his victory over them was unexpected and astonishing to many, it was because they underestimated him.’
      • ‘Of course, letting people underestimate you has tactical advantages.’
      • ‘She has fought her fair share of demons and to underestimate her now would prove a serious error of judgement.’
      • ‘‘They can underestimate us as much as they like,’ adds Hines scornfully.’
      • ‘But it could be a mistake for political opponents to underestimate him.’
      • ‘If she does that same type of preparation, she could impress people who are underestimating her.’
      • ‘We are certainly not going to catch them cold or underestimating us.’
      • ‘Back on his home patch, people are less likely to underestimate him.’
      • ‘I personally have been underestimating him for two years.’
      • ‘I'm not underestimating him and I'm not overestimating him.’
      • ‘However, he knew he would not be satisfied until every person paid for underestimating him.’
      • ‘I'm not sure they've been underestimating him, even before last week.’

noun

Pronunciation /ʌndərˈɛstɪmət/
  • An estimate that is too low.

    ‘£7.5 million is a considerable underestimate’
    • ‘Economists estimate inflation will be more than 500% this year but that forecast could prove an underestimate.’
    • ‘Even this figure is considered an underestimate as the government has never provided definite numbers for Scotland.’
    • ‘As noted, this number is actually probably a gross underestimate.’
    • ‘Total wealth is put in the region of £50m but is probably an underestimate.’
    • ‘Even this could be an underestimate: independent engineers suggest that it shouldn't have cost more than £15m.’
    • ‘The government's statistics on the quantity of fish being exported should be considered gross underestimates.’
    • ‘Nevertheless, this is still an underestimate, because it doesn't consider all the factors.’
    • ‘Nobody knows for sure how many copies have been sold around the world, but 100 million is probably an underestimate.’
    • ‘This can be considered as minimum as there appears to be underestimates on costs due to some uncertainties.’
    • ‘The official figure of between 10,000 and 12,000 was thought by many to be an underestimate.’
    • ‘If the Chancellor's past record of predicting the budget deficit is anything to go by, this is almost certainly an underestimate.’
    • ‘The latest figures show Britons leave at least £50m a year in restaurants, though this may be a gross underestimate.’
    • ‘This argument has been surprisingly popular this year, given what seems to be a gross underestimate of the peril that lies ahead.’
    • ‘Officials admit that the figures are an underestimate, as they are based on incident reports from soldiers with incomplete information.’
    • ‘The research identified seven cases of malaria transmitted in this way, which was probably an underestimate.’

Pronunciation

underestimate

Verb/ʌndərˈɛstɪmeɪt/

underestimate

Noun/ʌndərˈɛstɪmət/