Definition of uncouth in English:

uncouth

adjective

  • 1Lacking good manners, refinement, or grace.

    ‘he is unwashed, uncouth, and drunk most of the time’
    • ‘He's uncouth and socially immature, but all he really wants is to have a few friends.’
    • ‘Shouting matches in the street are so uncouth, but sometimes you've just gotta.’
    • ‘Max is unsophisticated, uncouth, rough and tough - but his heart is in the right place.’
    • ‘Asked whether the contract was worth £80m, he said: ‘My mum said it would be really uncouth of me to talk about money - but I'm rich beyond my wildest dreams.’’
    • ‘He was quite tall - taller than her and Blake, anyway - and had rather uncouth hair, as if it hadn't been cut for some time.’
    • ‘The left thinks him politically uncouth; the right thinks him socially uncouth.’
    • ‘‘You had a beard,’ she said, ‘dark in parts, still somewhat ragged and uncouth, not at all sophisticated.’’
    • ‘There was some name-calling and uncouth behaviour on the bus but nothing of the targeted and persistent nature required to constitute bullying.’
    • ‘This was disgraceful, uncouth behaviour on your part.’
    • ‘Elijah is smart, outspoken and strangely confident; David is uncouth, shy and subdued.’
    • ‘Feeling guilty about repossessing the Massie family home, Cooper and Leah hire Dale as a labourer on the property, but secretly object to his table manners and uncouth ways.’
    • ‘You are nothing but an uncouth, patronizing, unprincipled, rowdy group of misfits who aren't fit for any respectable job!’
    • ‘Problem was the tourists (an uncouth lot) kept pulling over the ice cream signs outside and the heat made the ice cream melt very quickly.’
    • ‘There is a lot of snobbery - it's looked upon as a bit uncouth.’
    • ‘Make no mistake, Harris is still sneering at the uncouth accents of his compatriots, except now he calls them consumers instead of hicks and they live in a subdivision instead of a holler.’
    • ‘You are the rudest, most foul, vulgar, offensive, and uncouth child I've ever seen!’
    • ‘If, while performing his duties, he was approached by petitioners who seemed uncouth or outlandish, he should not gawk or make them feel uncomfortable; rather, he should treat them politely and proceed with business as usual.’
    • ‘It turns out that she has a few skeletons in her closet, including parents who could optimistically be considered uncouth and a husband, Jake, who has refused to give her a divorce.’
    • ‘I haven't done anything to you, so I can't see the reason why I am treated in such an uncouth manner.’
    • ‘Unless he's uncouth and rude, give him a chance.’
    uncivilized, uncultured, uncultivated, unrefined, unpolished, unsophisticated, common, low, plebeian, philistine, rough, coarse, provincial, rustic, crude, gross, loutish, hooligan, boorish, oafish
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 (of art or language) lacking sophistication or delicacy.
      ‘uncouth sketches of peasants’
      • ‘The figure in blue pointed and gave a command in an uncouth language.’
      • ‘The uncouth language of the younger generation was particularly distressing.’
      • ‘‘Well, you're not going back to school until September, so we have a while,’ Elaine said sensibly, slightly annoyed by Gabriella's uncouth laughter.’
      • ‘Now they're being told they are uncouth as well…’
      • ‘The naiveté is ours if we pretend that Young is simply an uncouth, primitive painter, completely unaware of the history of the medium and some of its major practitioners.’
      • ‘Squalid public bickering was unknown to him, let alone the use of uncouth language.’
      • ‘Irregular and uncouth in form, rough in texture, and often repulsive in content, it summed up the distinctive traits of grotesque ugliness, standing as a debased counterpoint to exalted, flawless classical perfection.’
      • ‘‘His art was called original, free, honest and strong, as well as crude and uncouth,’ said Conrads.’
      • ‘Oh, Joshua I believe that's a little uncouth of you to ask, but I'll answer you regardless.’
      • ‘Though she could hold the rapt attention of an audience for hours on end with her brilliant wit, all thought it rather odd when she fell into brief lapses of unexplainable, uncouth laughter.’
      • ‘I hardly see how one person can cause all of that to happen and ruin a whole day, no matter how uncouth he is.’
      • ‘If my memory serves me correctly, we were talking about your uncouth mouth?’
      • ‘The drawings share some of the sculptures' rough and uncouth qualities: the line is generally neutral, even unmodulated, and acquires power through repetition rather than finesse.’
      • ‘Why did you just let him leave, I would think you would have attacked him on the spot like an uncouth laymen reviewing my work.’
  • 2archaic (of a place) wild, remote, or spartan.

    ‘his uncouth cell in Fleet prison’
    • ‘But, like many other prosperous geezers, they would prefer to hit the links and avoid uncouth places where nobody has heard of Metamucil.’

Origin

Old English uncūth ‘unknown’, from un- ‘not’ + cūth (past participle of cunnan ‘know, be able’).

Pronunciation

uncouth

/ʌnˈkuːθ/