Definition of uncosted in English:

uncosted

adjective

British
  • (of a policy or proposal) not having had its exact costs calculated.

    ‘uncosted spending commitments’
    ‘the proposals are ill-defined and uncosted’
    • ‘Uncosted promises have been made and researchers assured that funding will not fall.’
    • ‘It'll be a popular policy for both candidates but uncosted policies can backfire, and this one will be thoroughly tested through two elections.’
    • ‘A second aim, introduced in 2002, to improve the homes of "vulnerable" people in private accommodation had also been uncosted, it said.’
    • ‘There are no uncosted spending commitments.’
    • ‘The bigger and bolder the uncosted commitment, the louder the cheer from the hall.’
    • ‘The announcement was totally uncosted: I have been unable to find a press release anywhere that mentions a single dollar figure.’
    • ‘Some major promises are uncosted; the leaders won't even hint at the price tag.’
    • ‘In general, their policy is vague, lacking in specifics, and frequently uncosted.’
    • ‘He attacked his former party's plans as "uncosted, unworkable and likely to make immigration and asylum problems worse, not better".’
    • ‘Even before the Tories' announcement, Labour were already attacking the plans as "uncosted and untrustworthy".’

Pronunciation

uncosted

/ʌnˈkɒstɪd/