Definition of two-up two-down in English:

two-up two-down

noun

British
informal
  • A house with two reception rooms downstairs and two bedrooms upstairs:

    ‘he has returned to his two-up two-down in Billericay’
    • ‘I was brought up in a two-up two-down in Ordsall and taught to respect people.’
    • ‘A year ago, two-up two-down terraced houses there sold for about £135,000; now they're worth about £25,000 - £30,000 more.’
    • ‘She lived in a two-up two-down flat in Sydney Road, Sutton, which was earmarked for demolition as part of the best value review.’
    • ‘‘Take the kids and go back up to Yorkshire,’ he said, so my grandmother - with an eight-year-old boy, three girls aged six, four and two, and a new baby (my dad) - went back to Barnsley to live with her parents in a two-up two-down in Old Mill Lane.’
    • ‘I remember the houses, all two-up two-down, and barely having enough money to eat.’
    • ‘These were solid, industrial two-up two-down types, contrasting both in form and location with the earlier houses built higher up the hillside.’
    • ‘I was raised and lived till I was married in a traditional two-up two-down terraced house with no bathroom and an outside toilet.’
    • ‘There is a small internal entrance porch typical of a two-up two-down cottage to the front.’
    • ‘A two-up two-down terrace in Didsbury will set you back £250,000 and the bigger detached period houses are nearing £1m.’
    • ‘In 2001 two-up two-downs could easily be bought for £15,000.’
    • ‘Life wouldn't be as glam as in the original show, they wouldn't be as rich, and they'd be more likely to be living in a rented two-up two-down in Leeman Road than an art deco-style loft apartment.’
    • ‘In Drumcondra, there's a good selection of two-up two-down terraced houses off Botanic Avenue and on St Clement's Road but these are on the expensive side, selling for between €350,000 and €400,000.’

Pronunciation:

two-up two-down

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