Definition of twin in English:

twin

noun

  • 1One of two children or animals born at the same birth.

    ‘experiments were carried out using sets of identical twins’
    ‘the twins were approaching their third birthday’
    ‘I thought you must have a double or be a twin’
    • ‘Grace and her twin brother Billy are believed to be the smallest surviving set of twins ever born at Southend Hospital after coming into the world four months early.’
    • ‘Jesse and William, identical twins, were born two years later, and Tyrelle, two years after them.’
    • ‘A study of identical and fraternal twins separated at birth and adopted into different families showed the same heritability.’
    • ‘Now, tell me if you think I am wrong, but, if it wasn't for the fact that Cameron is nearly a decade older, they look like identical twins separated at birth!’
    • ‘The Comedy of Errors features two sets of identical twins, separated at birth, who end up in the same town on the same day.’
    • ‘Born as identical twins in Wales, they grew up in the UK with a mother with major mental illness and a shared history of abuse.’
    • ‘A mother had to be flown to a Norwich hospital to give birth to identical twins because there were not enough incubators at Southend's premature baby unit.’
    • ‘Siamese twins are identical twins who develop with a single placenta from a single zygote.’
    • ‘A woman was not given basic health checks for two-and-a-half hours giving birth to twins at a top private hospital, an inquest was told.’
    • ‘This is the first time that surgeons have tried to separate adult craniopagus twins - siblings born joined at the head.’
    • ‘Before routine electronic ultrasound scans and foetal monitors were introduced almost half of twins born to mothers in Ireland were unexpected.’
    • ‘The twins were born a year and a half after their brother.’
    • ‘The twins were born in April, yellow-haired like Quintus's brothers.’
    • ‘The birth of twins usually goes smoothly, with both born head down.’
    • ‘Ten years before I was born, following the birth of the twins, she was very very ill, and as the family mythology goes the doctors told her not to have any more children.’
    • ‘Her mother died after giving birth to twins, her brother and her.’
    • ‘Nearly 10,000 multiple births were recorded last year in the UK, and one in 35 children is now born as a twin, while triplet births have quadrupled in many countries.’
    • ‘On January 13, Rowland had given birth to twins, one of which had been stillborn, while the other, a girl, lived and has since been adopted.’
    • ‘When my own twins were born, several things happened.’
    • ‘Burt claimed to have studied fifty-three pairs of identical twins separated at birth and reared in different environments, and to have found that their IQs were very similar.’
    identical twins, non-identical twins, fraternal twins
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A person or thing that is exactly like another.
      ‘there was a bruise on his cheek, a twin to the one on mine’
      • ‘Indeed, the fugue's subject is almost a twin to the opening theme of Flos campi.’
      • ‘He could have just been a twin to the smaller man.’
      • ‘Her shrieking, wailing voice was the whisper of mortality piercing the ears like the banshee's own call, a twin to the driving terror that pierced the mind.’
      • ‘The recently launched Mercedes S-class could be a twin to BMW's 7-series.’
      • ‘León and Granada might be at opposing political extremes, but they are matching twins in their architecture.’
      • ‘While this new belt is the closest known match to our own, it is not a perfect twin.’
      • ‘You are seeing more and more of that in business, which is kind of a twin to a profit-sharing plan.’
      • ‘He looked around and saw his twin, who was the mirror image of him, and broke down.’
      • ‘Save for its bright red valve covers, the new engine is a twin to the LS1.’
      • ‘Soulmates are believed to be our ‘love match’, the other twin of our soul.’
      • ‘She wore a mouse-brown tunic belted with a matching braided rope (it matched her twin mouse-brown braids).’
      • ‘Like the article says, it's just a mirror-image twin of Prilosec, and therefore can't be expected to behave that much differently.’
      exact likeness, mirror image, double, duplicate, carbon copy, replica, image, living image, lookalike, clone
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2the Twins The zodiacal sign or constellation Gemini.
  • 2Something containing or consisting of two matching or corresponding parts.

    1. 2.1 A twin-bedded room.
      ‘the hotel has 54 rooms, of which 4 are twins’
      • ‘With the exception of suites, all two-bedded rooms are twins.’
      • ‘This price is based on two people sharing a twin / double bedded room on a bed and breakfast basis and dates offered start in May and go through to October.’
      • ‘You have to pay for this level of quality, and a standard twin or double room will set you back £260 per night, although smaller doubles are available for £220.’
      • ‘A standard twin or double room with breakfast will set you back around £150 per night, while executive suites are £220.’
      • ‘The rate is based on two people sharing a twin or double room.’
      • ‘A deposit of €220 is required for bookings and there is an option to upgrade to a superior twin or double room for the extra charge of €175.’
      • ‘The boys will be staying in the Emerald Tower wing of the MGM Grand Hotel (sharing a twin and triple room).’
      • ‘Staying at the 96-room hotel costs from 110 for a standard twin or double room.’
      • ‘A two-night break in April for two people sharing a standard twin or double room will set you back £420.’
      • ‘There are three large and fully furnished bedrooms - a twin, a double and a single room, so there is lots of space for a family in Ireland on holiday.’
      • ‘To stay there over the Christmas break, and potentially qualify for the free holiday, book a twin or double room for two nights.’
      • ‘Mostly there are four beds to a room, with some twins.’
      • ‘My room, a twin, is plainly furnished but very nice.’
    2. 2.2 A twin-engined aircraft.
      • ‘By this month, the company will take possession of its first big twin, a Bell 430.’
      • ‘Along the way, Aerostars offer their owners the lightest, most responsive handling of any medium twin.’
      • ‘Here are some critical situations that you should be familiar with and practice regularly to become competent flying twins.’
      • ‘Despite the fact that Senecas are twins, they try not to act like it.’
      • ‘The original widebody twin has sold well since its first delivery in 1995.’
      • ‘Why It's Undervalued: If you need a tough, durable, comfortable twin for high and hot, there's not much else you can buy for the same money.’
      • ‘After 17 years of flying twins, I was not too excited about the prospect of going back to a single.’
      • ‘Just like they had done during the airfield rescue, the twins were attacking the saucers.’
      • ‘When it comes to safely flying twins, currency is what keeps you safe.’
      • ‘It may come as a surprise, but not all twins are high-performance airplanes.’
      • ‘Introduced in 1964 as a fixed-gear twin, the original version left many folks scratching their heads.’
      • ‘For the pilot who can afford to own and operate the six-seater, it remains the paradigm of luxury, speed and handling for light twins.’
      • ‘I'm not sure how you force a cabin-class twin to that descent rate, at least with the wings still attached.’
      • ‘Not only does he fly IFR, but he also does it in an Aerostar - not exactly your entry-level twin.’
      • ‘He told us a Beech twin recently had reported VFR over Wendover, Utah, 120 miles to the west.’
      • ‘Their target buyer was someone who would be moving up from either a high-end piston single or twin.’
      • ‘Before this he had built up lots of time in piston and turbine twins as well as owning a Pitts S2A and S2B which he thoroughly enjoyed.’
      • ‘Some buyers will be moving up from piston singles and twins, raising the question of pilot qualification.’
      • ‘As the world's first dedicated multi trainer, the Apache helped teach America's future airline pilots to fly twins.’
      • ‘Adam Aircraft will be using a side stick on its new centerline thrust twin.’
    3. 2.3 A twinned crystal.
      • ‘Among the twinned crystals, Baveno twins are more common than Manebach.’
      • ‘It occurs as small, white single crystals or twins densely covering matrix.’
      • ‘Johnson Park crystals are rarely twinned, and those few twins that were observed are twinned according to the familiar Saint Andrews style.’
      • ‘The original cordierite crystals were sixling twins that give the pseudomorphs a flower-shaped cross section.’
      • ‘The Boltsburn mine is best known for its large, gemmy fluorite crystals, which are typically penetration twins.’
      • ‘Rhombohedral penetration twins of the ‘Rossie habit’ are occasionally encountered.’
      • ‘Apart from the lovely development of individual crystals, pentagonite also occurs as twins whereas cavansite does not.’
      • ‘Good brown macle twins up to several carats in weight have been available in recent years from the Udachnaya mine.’
      • ‘Calcite grains sometimes display regularly spaced twins, but dynamic recrystallization textures have not been found.’

adjective

  • 1attributive Forming, or being one of, a pair born at one birth.

    ‘she gave birth to twin boys’
    ‘her twin sister’
    • ‘Today the couple are proud parents of twin boys.’
    • ‘Lisa, my twin sister, Jane, and I had gone to see Helen Reddy.’
    • ‘Above Dominic's bed hangs the watercolour painting he made as a gift for his twin sister Rebecca and the letters sent to him by relatives and friends.’
    • ‘Ailsa looked down at her older twin sisters and the boy who was with them.’
    • ‘I think my sister got the newborn twin ponies in 1987, and I vaguely remember having the baby sea ponies; I don't remember the llama and dino at all.’
    • ‘Gavin caught up utterly out of breath and he gave a look of complete gratitude to the twin sisters.’
    • ‘The Bridesmaid was Martina Murphy, twin sister of the Bride.’
    • ‘Witnesses say they saw nothing-just a little boy and his twin sister playing at the sand part of the park while many other children ran around, screaming.’
    • ‘One of the twin boys was critically ill, suffering from hypothermia and hypoglycaemia - deficiency of glucose in the bloodstream - and was badly malnourished.’
    • ‘The Bill and Ben stories were invented by their older sister Hilda, as tales to keep the twin boys amused whilst they had their bath.’
    • ‘The dead girl's twin sister and a 13-year-old girl escaped with minor injuries and were taken to Wythenshawe Hospital.’
    • ‘At his funeral, Gary's twin sister, Hannah, said: ‘Gary was the best brother I could ever imagine having.’’
    • ‘When I was the promotions director for Azuli Records, my twin sister, Paula, came to stay with me for a week and I was so snowed under at work that I asked her to come in and sort out my database.’
    • ‘She was one of a family of seven, six girls and one boy, and was a twin sister of Delia.’
    • ‘Kor and her twin sister, Miriam Mozes Zeiger, along with thousands of other twins, were subjected to experiments under the direction of Nazi Dr. Josef Mengele.’
    • ‘Up next, the emotional story of twin sisters who made sure the mental illness that divided their lives did not break their bond.’
    • ‘London-born artists and twin sisters, Amrit and Rabindra, have widely exhibited in the United Kingdom and abroad.’
    • ‘Helena suffers from Type One Spinal Muscular Atrophy, a muscle wasting genetic disease from which her twin sister Saskia is mercifully free.’
    • ‘Christine McGlin's twin boys, Christopher and Ross, are 14, strapping lads, but she still picks them up from school.’
    • ‘The family is now worried about letting their two other cats, Rainbow, 14, and Tiggy's twin sister Smokey go outside their home.’
    1. 1.1 Forming a matching, complementary, or closely connected pair.
      ‘the twin problems of economic failure and social disintegration’
      • ‘Since independence, the twin forces of economic development and population growth have literally bulldozed their way through the city's greenery.’
      • ‘He hated waste and ostentatious consumption, and the car he developed at Ford, the Falcon, reflected his twin commitments to economy and safety.’
      • ‘I follow the Microsoft case with interest, of course, given my twin interests in economics and technology.’
      • ‘This coincides with the current division in the law as represented by the twin doctrines of undue influence and economic duress.’
      • ‘On the ground, heavily armed monster trucks, twin turreted tanks and other impressive enemies will test your mettle.’
      • ‘The twin engines of economic growth - the technological revolution and globalisation - will only widen the existing gap.’
      • ‘Who in the world would we rather have as allies and fellow travellers in pursuing the twin challenges of economic performance and social justice?’
      • ‘In many quarters, the combination of these two dominant features raises twin concerns about political stability and racial and economic justice.’
      • ‘It is hard, therefore, for the Executive to reconcile its twin goals of putting the social and economic agendas together at the top of their list of priorities.’
      • ‘Maximizing economic growth and minimizing subsistence labor should be the twin goals of any rich, modern society.’
      • ‘Silver (and, later, tin) mining and agriculture in the highlands have historically been the twin pillars of the economy.’
      • ‘It's easy, especially given the twin whammies of war and a tough economy, to surrender to despair about your prospects for improvement.’
      • ‘Economic and social development as twin goals of the developmental state cannot take place under the pathologies of greed, tribalism and incompetence.’
      • ‘As it was, its thick grey walls and twin turrets gave it a look of defensibility, as though it were here despite the quiescent malice of the forest.’
      • ‘Governed by the twin objectives of lower tax and deregulation, Ireland's economic soul is more like that of the US than the EU.’
      • ‘The second half of the 1920s was a time of remarkable economic achievement, as America reaped the twin dividends of post-war recovery and technological development.’
      • ‘Any mismatch between these two sectors would weaken the functioning of the economy, and would prevent the realisation of the twin objectives of growth and stability.’
      • ‘Elliott's mathematical life circulated round the twin foci of Oxford and London.’
      • ‘As I have mentioned, the Act had the twin objectives, in summary, of economic advancement and environmental protection.’
      • ‘The two men will campaign jointly for the next three days on the twin issues of education and the economy, launching the party manifesto chapters dealing with both tomorrow.’
      matching, identical, matched, paired
      closely related, closely linked, closely connected
      twofold, double, dual
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2Botany Growing in pairs.
      ‘twin seed leaves’
    3. 1.3 (of a bedroom) containing two single beds.
      ‘we have twin and three-bedded rooms’
      • ‘Its four floors comprise a kitchen/dining room, a lounge and two twin bedrooms with a ‘turret toilet’ and shower room on each level.’
      • ‘Deirdre and Margaret will arrive here on Friday at 3pm and be shown to their tastefully decorated twin bedroom with en suite bathroom.’
      • ‘A smaller staircase leads to two twin bedrooms, also with en suites.’
      • ‘The upper floor on both sides consists of a twin bedroom with fitted wardrobes and wooden ceiling beams.’
      • ‘The attic is converted to offer two more bedrooms, both twin rooms with solid timber floors.’
      • ‘Accommodation in these units includes two double bedrooms, one twin room and a box bedroom.’
      • ‘Another double bedroom overlooking the rear garden has dark green walls and an en suite, while there are two further twin bedrooms.’
      • ‘Each one is a comfortable, self-contained holiday flat with sitting room, dining/kitchen, double or twin rooms and en-suite bathrooms.’
      • ‘The other three carriages have been converted to provide two four-poster, three double and two twin bedrooms, allowing guests to combine food with an overnight stay.’
      • ‘She will have a twin room for single use as well as breakfast and her evening meal.’
      • ‘There is a choice of single or twin rooms, and every bedroom is en-suite.’
      • ‘Our attic suite was half the size of our Dublin terrace house, with a huge main bedroom and a comfortable twin room for the boys.’
      • ‘First there is a twin bedroom with a fitted wardrobe and another unusual feature - the old cottage wall is the inner wall of the room.’
      • ‘Five twin rooms at a Hilton hotel in the UK and Ireland will be awarded to each Driver of the Day at the following race meeting.’
      • ‘A family suite of two twin rooms (sharing a bathroom) is only £40 a head: an absolute bargain.’
      • ‘Each chalet has five twin bedrooms, all en suite, a Jacuzzi for tired muscles and log fires.’
      • ‘Sleeping arrangements consist of a twin bedroom with a pullout double bed and a single sofa-bed in the living room.’
      • ‘Weekend retreats and courses cost £80 including accommodation and meals for a single room, and £72 each for a twin room.’
      • ‘The twin bedroom is particularly charming and is now a children's room with nursery rhyme wallpaper and decorative features.’
      • ‘Again, their bedroom will be a twin room with an interconnecting room for the boys.’
    4. 1.4 (of a crystal) twinned.
      • ‘Continuing on your tour you see a 70-cm-high giant twin calcite crystal from Siberia that gives off an amber glow in sunlight.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]British
  • 1Link (a town or district) with another in a different country or cause (two towns or districts) to be linked, for the purposes of friendship and cultural exchange.

    ‘the Russian city of Kostroma is twinned with Durham’
    • ‘The town is also twinned with the city of Dole in France and Northwitch in England.’
    • ‘The town twinning exchange will take place from April 27th to May 2nd.’
    • ‘‘It is a fact that is often forgotten by the people of Portlaoise that the town is twinned with Coulounieix-Chamiers,’ said Cllr Jacob.’
    • ‘This year the walkers were joined by a group of 80 or so French visitors from Viarmes, France, a town which is twinned with Tubbercurry.’
    • ‘Mr Love told the Winchester Star: ‘We are twinned with the town of Giessen in Germany.’’
    • ‘The arrival of a group of visitors in the town twinning exchange from Viarmes, Paris is in the pipeline and is scheduled for April.’
    • ‘He said Pittsfield now felt very much linked with Athis Mons, given that the French town was also twinned with Ballina.’
    • ‘160 towns in Ireland will twinned with 160 visiting countries from around the world.’
    • ‘The town has been twinned with the Czech Republic for the celebrations and will host a grand pageant through the town on May 1 to celebrate the arrival of the Eastern European nation into the EU fold.’
    • ‘We saw signs for an Irish village, a Turkish village, a Danish project, and a village twinned with a German town.’
    • ‘Devizes is the only town in Great Britain to be twinned with a Finnish town.’
    • ‘The town has Canadian links as it is twinned with Rycroft, near Alberta.’
    • ‘Irish signs have recently been erected on the approaches to the town with the name Muinebheag and informing people, ás Gaeilge, that the town is twinned with Pont-Pean, France.’
    • ‘For now, some of Bulgaria's seaside resorts have already twinned with towns in Hungary.’
    • ‘Out of the blue, we were twinned with a town that most people had never heard of and had no idea where in the world it was.’
    • ‘Castlecomer has recently been twinned with this town.’
    • ‘The delegation was led by Castlebar Town Mayor, Blackie Gavin and the group attended a trade fair in the town, which is twinned with Castlebar.’
    • ‘When he was elected the former college principal said: ‘I would like to see Marlborough twinned with a continental town.’’
    • ‘My home town in New Zealand was twinned with Reno, Nevada.’
    • ‘Breton culture is Celtic rather than French, and it is interesting to note that many of the villages are twinned with small Irish towns.’
    1. 1.1 Link; combine.
      ‘the company twinned its core business of brewing with that of distilling’
      • ‘In habitually using the term ‘nation-state’ to describe our collective status, we assume these two entities to be indissolubly twinned.’
      • ‘I twin this with a memory, from the same period, of stalking out of one of my writing classes because the students hadn't done the reading.’
      • ‘Six- and four-bed wards are twinned, with one nursing station covering the pair.’
      • ‘A major project will be taking place to twin the road between Exits 3 and 5.’
      • ‘It seems impossible to believe any highway development project could move more slowly than that to twin the highway south of Winnipeg.’
      • ‘The two groups were twinned back in 1998 as part of a Co-Operation Ireland initiative.’
      • ‘His best-selling dish twins pepper shrimp with a rum and ginger sauce.’
      • ‘You can't twin democracy and occupation, you can't twin freedom and occupation.’
      combine, join, link, couple, pair, yoke, match
      View synonyms

Origin

Late Old English twinn ‘double’, from twi- ‘two’; related to Old Norse tvinnr. Current verb senses date from late Middle English.

Pronunciation

twin

/twɪn/