Definition of twilit in English:

twilit

(also twilighted)

adjective

  • 1Dimly illuminated by or as if by twilight:

    ‘the deserted twilit street’
    • ‘I glanced back out of the window, watching lush green scenery roll by under a rosy twilit sky.’
    • ‘A flash of pain traced a thin course across his chest and he reeled backward to sprawl in the twilit clearing.’
    • ‘Binoculars help reveal background stars in the twilit sky as Venus glides past the top of the ‘teapot’ of the constellation Sagittarius during the first third of the month.’
    • ‘Through the twilit streets of Arlington, past used car lots and restaurants, she tracked the tail lights of his car.’
    • ‘Yesterday I walked down to the pool, via the exquisite twilit waterfront where the sea lay like cool mercury, barely rippling, and small boats mirrored themselves.’
    • ‘As lighting is predominantly from the twilit sky, you'll still get a sufficient amount of foreground detail.’
    • ‘With the neon sign winking against a twilit sky and bench seats arranged in booths with retro chrome fittings all over the shop, the ambience is undoubtedly that of the mid-West where the all roads are blacktops and the eggs over easy.’
    • ‘Comforted by the fact that Humphrey was looking well, but worried by Craig's refusal to answer her, Jane started walking back across the twilit hills to her home and dinner.’
    • ‘Late on the twilit Alaskan summer night, she confronted him on the Juneau Company wharf.’
    • ‘I was cycling through the twilit back fields of Canterbury past milk opal bonfires on my way to visit Toni in her caravan.’
    • ‘The brilliant planet climbs higher in the twilit sky throughout the month; it also brightens slightly, as it catches up to Earth in its orbital race around the Sun.’
    • ‘A little girl turned her face up to see the limitless Manhattan sky bursting with reds and blues, and her favourite, the whistling ‘fish’ that smeared their shimmering residue across the twilit sky.’
    • ‘Mary sails stoically aloft, umbrella out, against a twilit London skyline towards a horizontal beyond, pregnant with venturesome possibility.’
    • ‘Outside on the deck, she went immediately to the railing and looked out over the twilit Square.’
    1. 1.1 Relating to or denoting the period of twilight:
      ‘twilit hours’
      • ‘For the next forty-five twilit years of eclipse, he was to carry on, a true Man of Letters, indomitably writing - in Nassau, Paris, and Menton.’
      • ‘His ideas inform the stark images of rural wastelands, twilit amusement parks and whiskey bottles that augment the musician's songs in the film.’
      • ‘But that twilit vision of humanity the shadows of film noir were first intended to conceal from its audience, that was never left behind.’
      • ‘The beginning of the winter brought a new season of parties and gatherings with which the aristocrats sought to dispel the gloominess of this permanently twilit world.’
      • ‘It was a dim, twilit gloom filled the enormous tunnels, muffling all hints of life within them.’
      • ‘He looked forward to a gentle decline into an eccentric and amiable dotage, his twilit years untroubled by chore or challenge.’
      • ‘Here, there was a darkness that went beyond the darkness of the twilit autumn night, and here there was a silence that was a close relative of the silence of Illi-Tay-Ynnaudraurios.’
      • ‘In contrast to the suggestion of its title, ‘Chiaro’ changes the atmosphere to something twilit, as though the listener had strayed from sunlit beaches into a shadowy jungle full of hidden creatures.’
      • ‘Here bright colors jump out from twilit gloom; synthetic pinks and greens jar the eye.’

Origin

Mid 19th century: past participle of the literary verb twilight.

Pronunciation:

twilit

/ˈtwʌɪlɪt/