Definition of twice in English:



  • 1Two times; on two occasions.

    ‘the earl married twice’
    ‘the tablets should be taken twice a day’
    • ‘Barrett had long been suspected of the murder and had been questioned about it at least twice.’
    • ‘I was unlucky enough to have my car broken into twice and badly damaged over the same weekend.’
    • ‘He married twice, the second time to a Brazilian girl he met while filming in the country.’
    • ‘He had twice had injections of local anaesthetic because it had become so painful.’
    • ‘The bathroom towels would probably get changed twice a year, along with the clocks.’
    • ‘Mr Fear, a tree surgeon, takes the children to work on the allotment at least twice a week.’
    • ‘One good thing about owning a boutique is that twice a year we get to go on buying sprees in London and Paris.’
    • ‘Arthur had also been telephoning Violet at least twice a week for over twelve months.’
    • ‘To come back against Celtic twice speaks volumes about my team and their commitment.’
    • ‘I wouldn't look twice at a young man who still lived at home in his early twenties.’
    • ‘Only twice in the space of the past two months have they emerged victorious by more than a single goal.’
    • ‘Two students who went to her aid were shot - one in the leg, the other twice in the stomach.’
    • ‘One of the students was punched and kicked to the ground and the other was stabbed twice in the chest.’
    • ‘He said he had confided that he was hearing voices, and had woken twice at night screaming.’
    • ‘It took over six weeks and twice daily nursing care to heal the wound, but it did eventually heal.’
    • ‘Lili worked as a translator, married twice and has a daughter who lives in America.’
    • ‘He sits down only twice, and takes very occasional sips from a single glass of water.’
    • ‘He won twice at Darley Moor and on several occasions he has picked up the first novice award.’
    • ‘The captain, who had twice refused to take off, eventually said he was going to fly.’
    • ‘Be sure to clean out and fill the bird bath with fresh water twice a week in hot weather.’
    1. 1.1Double in degree or quantity.
      ‘I'm twice your age’
      ‘an engine twice as big as the original’
      • ‘How could a company help twice as many people as it was paid for and still turn a profit?’
      • ‘The figures also show that men are more than twice as likely to be registered as out of work as women.’
      • ‘Poorer women were twice as likely to be obese as those in the richest fifth of the population.’
      • ‘Are five boring idiots in a house twice as boring, or only half as boring, as ten boring idiots?’
      • ‘To do so would make the government's unemployment record look more than twice as bad.’
      • ‘It will always take twice as long as you think in terms of effort, time and cost.’
      • ‘Britain as a whole is consuming well over twice as much alcohol as it did 50 years ago.’
      • ‘We are now testing degrees of engagement at a time when we have twice as many people on the books.’
      • ‘She used to be an athlete and speaks twice as fast as I can write; she has a racing demon of a voice.’
      • ‘The ceiling is covered in mirrors which reflects the light and makes the room seem twice as high.’
      • ‘If the cars around York had twice as many people in them, at a stroke we could halve the traffic!’
      • ‘Mahler sang his praises, and Puccini said he had twice as much talent as he needed.’
      • ‘People in the province are twice as likely to be victims of violent assault than in America.’
      • ‘Those who fail are almost twice as anxious and have faster heart rates than those who pass.’
      • ‘He can launch a tennis ball into orbit, throwing at least twice as far as any of the rest of us can manage.’
      • ‘We had twice as many fans there as them, so I think the support for the club will always be there.’
      • ‘If last year's harvest was a disaster, this year's crop is going to be at least twice as bad.’
      • ‘Any time spent weeding this month will save twice as much time later in the season.’
      • ‘Does this means that it's twice as safe to drive in areas with higher speed limits?’
      • ‘If the average wage doubles, then we'll all have twice as much to spend on where we live.’


Late Old English twiges, from the base of two + -s (later respelled -ce to denote the unvoiced sound); compare with once.