Definition of turn in English:

turn

verb

  • 1Move in a circular direction wholly or partly round an axis or point.

    no object ‘the big wheel was turning’
    with object ‘I turned the key in the door and crept in’
    • ‘He lay in bed, feeling better and just waiting for the gears in his body to start turning and working once again.’
    • ‘To tighten the chain, first loosen the two nuts that hold the bar, then turn the screw clockwise.’
    • ‘Inside, a large circular stone is rapidly turning and grinding dried corn kernels into flour, using only the power of the running water.’
    • ‘The most striking design element of the atrium is the circular stair that turns 180 degrees between floors.’
    • ‘He waits several minutes before at last strolling toward the door, turning the knob clockwise and stepping through quietly.’
    • ‘When you open up previously inaccessible areas by turning a lever or depressing a block, the camera unlocks its view from the character.’
    • ‘Before Copernicus, medieval scholars solemnly concluded that the Earth couldn't possibly be moving and turning.’
    • ‘I was saddened to find sloppiness in the steering, so that at low speeds one has to nudge the wheel rather than turn it.’
    go round, revolve, rotate, spin, go round and round, go round in circles, roll, circle, wheel, whirl, twirl, gyrate, swivel, spiral, pivot
    go round, pass round, sweep round, round
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1with object Perform (a somersault or cartwheel)
      ‘the boy shot up off the ground and turned a somersault in the air’
      • ‘More than that, she adds, being able to balance on her hands, to turn cartwheels, to tumble and flip is part of who she is.’
      • ‘Suppose that he happened to glance around and notice a monkey turning a somersault.’
      • ‘Her wingman obeyed, turning a somersault and ending up flying straight at the Flankers.’
      • ‘By the time the guests arrived she wasn't turning cartwheels, but she was pretty perky.’
      • ‘It's easy, but frightening, to imagine Eagles coach Andy Reid turning cartwheels if he actually were to get Williams.’
      • ‘When a boy can turn cartwheels, his colour and country of origin are of no importance at all.’
      • ‘Chelsea laughed, turning a cartwheel across the green.’
      • ‘Moray eels shout at you in silent warning from their crevices and rays have been known to turn somersault.’
      • ‘The fourth, and possibly most pertinent, question is whether young girls today ever turn cartwheels.’
      • ‘Germans were always solemn; a pig turning somersaults could not make them smile.’
      • ‘At his feet is a dog turning a cartwheel, seemingly to the snap of Wolfe's fingers.’
      • ‘Feeling the urge to vomit, his stomach was currently turning cartwheels.’
      • ‘He bit his lip, trying to avoid looking at either the ship or the sea itself; both were already making him nauseous and he could feel his stomach turning somersaults.’
      • ‘He popped into the air and flew over several disorderly piles of stuff, turning somersaults as he went.’
      • ‘Rhea jumped up, kicking off from the demon's shoulders, turning a high somersault across the room.’
      • ‘But the lawyers need to turn some somersaults before they can get there.’
      • ‘Who cares whether he's turning somersaults or running off to the sideline to get water (actually he played pretty well).’
      • ‘When I stand up the room tips a little as if I'm wasted, and my stomach is currently turning somersaults.’
      • ‘Even Carolyn could turn a cartwheel, so Ellie doubted that she could make the squad.’
      • ‘Hurrying from the room, his mind turned dizzying somersaults with thoughts of his missing wife and what her reappearance might mean.’
      perform, execute, do, carry out
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    2. 1.2with object Twist or sprain (an ankle)
      ‘Wright turned his ankle in the first minute of the game’
      • ‘The beachside is a mess, and Hillary for one would not like to risk a stroll along the seafront in case of turning my finely turned ankle.’
      • ‘Sprained ankles commonly result from tripping or turning the ankle the wrong way.’
      • ‘One person twisted or turned his or her ankle.’
      sprain, twist, rick, wrench
      View synonyms
  • 2with object and adverbial Move (something) so that it is in a different position in relation to its surroundings or its previous position.

    ‘we waited in suspense for him to turn the cards over’
    • ‘He displays the paired canvases side by side or one above the other, though he may add a twist by turning one of them 180 degrees.’
    • ‘The world, as the traditionalists see it, has been turned almost completely upside down.’
    • ‘My whole life has been turned upside down and I just don't know what to do or think anymore.’
    • ‘Life in America was turned upside down by the Wall Street Crash of October 1929.’
    • ‘Now turn the pocket right side out through the opening you left in the seam at the top.’
    • ‘The player turns the other two cards face down, and places the chosen card face up.’
    • ‘My world had been turned upside down and I feared that it would never be right again.’
    • ‘With a sweeping motion, he turns me to my side and pushes the top of my body backwards, draping it over his arm.’
    • ‘That same poll also depicted a city whose demographics had been turned upside down.’
    • ‘Bobby joined him not long after, having failed to market circular beach towels that did not need to be turned as the sun moved.’
    • ‘Do up all buttons, snaps, zippers, etc. before washing and turn the garment inside out.’
    • ‘Andy snorted again, turning the rag a different direction.’
    • ‘Our perceptions too of Gilbert and Sullivan are turned upside down, or perhaps right side up.’
    • ‘Will changes in tournament format and a move to the sport condition turn your regular game upside down?’
    • ‘Alex turned the paper several different ways, trying to figure out which way was up.’
    • ‘I found myself turning a box of cards around so the Virgin Mary wouldn't have to witness me buying skeleton candy.’
    1. 2.1no object Change the position of one's body so that one is facing in a different direction.
      ‘Charlie turned and looked at his friend’
      • ‘Chris brought himself to a sitting position and gasped, turning around to see her facing him.’
      • ‘He turned so his body was toward me and put an elbow on the tabletop, his head in his hand, propping it up.’
      • ‘I opened my eyes and forced my body to turn just in time to stop myself from landing on my stomach.’
      • ‘He's very effective as a receiver if he has time to get his body turned downfield after the catch.’
      • ‘She bent down, picked up her cloak, and wrapped it back around her body before turning around.’
      • ‘He turned and used his body as a barrier between her and the ball, moving from side to side to try and get around her.’
      • ‘Finn hadn't noticed that I was awake by now, so I just enjoyed my present position before turning around to face him.’
      • ‘Watch people turn round to see what's on.’
      • ‘Slowly his body turned and he took a step forward, followed by another and then another.’
      • ‘She easily rotates her body, turning so she isn't vertical anymore, but horizontal, facing me and on all fours, her claws dug into the wood and drawing sap.’
      • ‘He turned from his position at the window to see which one of the three it was this time.’
      • ‘The man turns around from his position and looks down upon the face of the woman below him.’
      • ‘My hips and body are turning faster, which knocks my timing out.’
      • ‘She led him to the edge of the pool then turned around so her body was against his.’
      • ‘With a twist of his body, Vince turned so that his left leg was now resting on top of the broken wall of stone.’
      • ‘I shook my head, turning away from the body that she held limply.’
      • ‘She quickly turned again to see nothing… again.’
      • ‘The way the shape of her body changed as she turned and walked away.’
      • ‘As if out of body, he turned and picked her up, idly stroking her head before setting her on the ground.’
      • ‘Gia turned from her crouched position and took in the features of the man lying on the table.’
      change direction, turn round, change course, make a u-turn, reverse direction
      View synonyms
    2. 2.2 Move (something) so as to be aimed or pointed in a particular direction.
      ‘she turned her head towards me’
      ‘the government has now turned its attention to primary schools’
      • ‘We have to turn our minds and attention to the serious challenge about what to do about social conditions.’
      • ‘During the mating season, birds' attention turns toward nesting.’
      • ‘The scene between Kimberly and Gaines, where she tries to attract attention by beating on the windows and he lazily turns the gun towards her, was a nice moment.’
      • ‘If you're like me and your attention is starting to turn toward home, this issue offers plenty of ideas.’
      • ‘After a week like no other, people turned a sad, wary eye skyward on their way to work.’
      • ‘I turned my gaze upward, trying to concentrate on something else.’
      • ‘The appearance of a comet attracted Harriot's attention and turned his scientific mind towards astronomy.’
      • ‘The old man turns his gaze directly across the street.’
      • ‘Several curious onlookers turn their heads towards the direction of the laughter.’
      • ‘She scoffed his direction as she turned her head toward her sandwich once more.’
      • ‘Afraid to look in her direction now, he sat up slowly and turned his back toward her.’
      • ‘The horse gave the man one last fleeting glance before turning his head towards the direction of the forest and breaking into a gallop.’
      • ‘Once May Day is over, direct activists are to turn their attentions to a huge arms exhibition at the end of the summer.’
      • ‘Eventually, Zem turned his gaze upward, to the stars, thinking.’
      • ‘She suddenly felt like she was going in a wrong direction and she turned her head and ran smack into a corner.’
      • ‘On close inspection, you will see that butterflies have very large eyes, allowing them to see in every direction without turning their heads.’
      • ‘At this, Colby turned his gaze upward in thought.’
      • ‘After William's death, Mrs. Morel turns her love and attention to Paul.’
      • ‘I hopped up quickly, cautiously moving around, rolling my eyes in every direction, turning my head every which way.’
      • ‘Now he is turning his hand to directing a feature film for the first time.’
      aim at, point at, level at, direct at, train at, focus on
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    3. 2.3 Change or cause to change direction.
      no object, with adverbial of direction ‘we turned round and headed back to the house’
      • ‘I went down to the end of the road and turned left in the direction of the newsagent.’
      • ‘The beast turned a different way and tore up the hallway, many screams following.’
      • ‘They turned round once more towards Holme and drove slowly back to the spot.’
      • ‘Tim frowned, then shook his head and gritted his teeth, turning down a different street, changing direction.’
      • ‘Give us your take on St. Petersburg as a whole and the first time ever that the IndyCar Series cars turned both right and left.’
      • ‘The prey very soon learns that just running away from the predator as fast as it can is doomed to failure, whereas turning randomly to move in a zig-zag fashion is much more successful.’
      • ‘Then he said the car turned towards the pavement but the driver appeared to change her mind at the last minute.’
      • ‘With in-flight turns, first move your eyes in the direction the aircraft is turning - then follow with your head.’
      • ‘Giles froze and listened to Wes as he gave directions to Gunn to turn the boat and head back to shore.’
      • ‘Giving a fleeting look at his mother in the car, he turned and walked towards the dorms.’
      • ‘Popo turned, and saw his black car turning left, headed towards one of the main exit highways.’
      • ‘The figure reacted as if she had transformed into a ghost, turning away and moving back in the direction they had come with considerably more speed than they had used in their approach.’
      • ‘The robber stole cash before making off on foot and turning left in the direction of Braintree.’
      • ‘The taller, thinner Lewis moves haphazardly, turning here and there, unsure where to go.’
      change direction, turn round, change course, make a u-turn, reverse direction
      bend, curve, wind, twist, loop, meander, snake, zigzag
      View synonyms
    4. 2.4no object (of the tide) change from flood to ebb or vice versa.
      ‘as the tide turned he finally managed to bring the barge into its berth’
      • ‘The tide started turning during the '70s, mostly due to economic factors.’
      • ‘And then, like the tide turning, I felt a great rushing and churning inside.’
      • ‘When the tide turns and the water becomes slack, the dives are dull, with little wildlife.’
      • ‘Dracula called in a fog to keep the boat docked until after the tide turned, so that he could board it.’
      • ‘The sky is closing in, darker clouds sweeping in almost as fast as the tide has turned.’
      • ‘Perhaps they haven't realized that the tide is turning.’
      • ‘They were going north-east, but when the tide turned, they would sweep back towards the south-west.’
      • ‘But signs from the US may show the tide is turning.’
      • ‘The ocean's tide is turning as Covel heads back to Cordova.’
      • ‘To get a bait out to the fish as soon as the tide turns I use a party balloon to trot the bait to the fish.’
      • ‘How long before the tide turns and takes half of it back out again?’
      • ‘The flood of people running for the gates rolled back, like a tide turning, and the people scattered, no longer a single united mass.’
      • ‘By 3pm the tide had turned and the boats were approaching the Crossness sewage outfall at Belvedere.’
      • ‘However, with today's Law Lords decision and the government's defeat on detention without charge the tide may finally be turning.’
      • ‘A little after 2pm the tide turned and it ran like the proverbial clappers.’
      • ‘As an industry, we still have a long way to go - but the tide is turning.’
      • ‘However, it took so long that the tide turned and started to pull her out of place.’
      • ‘Being local lads, Paul and myself are more than aware that Cougar fans have had more than their fair share of ups and downs over the last few seasons, but now I feel that the tide is turning for us again.’
      • ‘And there are some pointers that the tide is turning, even if slowly.’
      • ‘Following the destruction of the American fleet at Pearl Harbour, the tide had slowly turned.’
    5. 2.5with object Move (a page) over so that it is flat against the previous or next page.
      ‘she turned a page noisily’
      no object ‘turn to page five for the answer’
      • ‘For more information on how you can help these charities, turn to page 2, or you can fill out the form in the Concern advert on this page.’
      • ‘She turned a few more pages until she came across some recipes for low fat treats.’
      • ‘He turned a few more pages and saw a pic of him and Emily which was taken at the Bacchanalia.’
      • ‘If he had turned one more page, he would have seen all of the drawings I had done of him.’
      • ‘As soon as the first page has been turned the author's shock tactics come out in full force.’
      • ‘It turns a very sad page in the history of this government.’
      • ‘The page had to be turned, he argued, in the interests of the nation.’
      • ‘The romantic comedy takes flight, and it is hard to put the book down until the last page has been turned.’
      • ‘I turned a few more pages, seeing the cast of characters and a few more illustrations.’
      • ‘Conscientious readers will find it slow going unless they overcome the constant temptation to turn to the references section.’
      • ‘You can not help but turn each and every page in succession, until you reach the end.’
      flip over, flick over, flick through, leaf through
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    6. 2.6 Fold or unfold (fabric or a piece of a garment) in the specified way.
      ‘he turned up the collar of his coat’
      double, double over, double up, crease, turn under, turn up, turn over, bend, overlap
      View synonyms
    7. 2.7usually as adjective turnedPrinting with object Set or print (a type or letter) upside down.
    8. 2.8with object Pass round (the flank or defensive lines of an army) so as to attack it from the side or rear.
      ‘there was still the sea, by way of which the Persians hoped to turn all mountain or isthmus defence lines’
      • ‘With almost 80,000 men Wellington outnumbered the French, and tried to pin Joseph to his position by a frontal attack while turning his flank.’
    9. 2.9archaic with object Bend back (the edge of a blade) so as to make it blunt.
      ‘thou hast also turned the edge of his sword’
    10. 2.10with object Remake (a garment or a sheet), putting the worn outer side on the inside.
      ‘a sheet that Mrs Dibb wanted turned sides to middle’
  • 3Change or cause to change in nature, state, form, or colour; become or make.

    no object, with complement or adverbial ‘she turned pale’
    with object and complement or adverbial ‘cover potatoes with sacking to keep the light from turning them green’
    ‘most of the sugars are turned into alcohol’
    • ‘It is good for a bit of a chuckle if the weather turns nasty this weekend.’
    • ‘If the weather turns dry raise the height of cut to prevent browning and scorching of the grass.’
    • ‘We walked slowly towards my campus, when the conversation turned in the last direction I wanted it to.’
    • ‘Lately he has taken up the war on cockroaches as the weather turns warmer.’
    • ‘He walked down the street just as the slight drizzle turned into a moderate downpour.’
    • ‘The rewards are so great these days, and guys are under pressure to turn pro earlier rather than later.’
    • ‘With the weather turning colder, homes will have bought heating oil in large quantities.’
    • ‘Once the weather turned ugly for the final 15 minutes, Fremantle had no hope.’
    • ‘On Saturday and Sunday I managed to sit in the glorious sunshine and turn a delightful pink colour, but that has now gone to a dark olive brown.’
    • ‘I was gripping the steering wheel so hard that my knuckles had turned white.’
    • ‘Just when my bikini arrives in the mail, the weather turns cold.’
    • ‘Dr Harding advised elderly people not to go out if the weather turns as cold as predicted.’
    • ‘Artemis simply smiled at her and she could see his face turn a slight pink colour, this made her giggle.’
    • ‘The crowd had turned ugly, and the police tried to stop him.’
    • ‘He knew his face had more than likely turned a deep red colour, but he tried not to seem put off by this.’
    • ‘With the weather turning wet and decidedly cold, children and adults alike need indoor pastimes to keep the blues away.’
    • ‘His green eyes once again turned to ice, so penetrating but empty of emotion.’
    • ‘Beef prices in this country are down a third, and the weather has turned sour.’
    • ‘While nationwide blackouts should be avoided, however, localised blackouts are likely if the weather turns severe.’
    • ‘This engaging picture book tells the story of a monster who is so ugly that when he looks at a blue sky the weather turns foul.’
    become, develop into, prove to be, turn out to be
    become, go, grow, get, come to be
    convert, change, transform, make
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    1. 3.1with object and complement or adverbial Send or put into a specified place or condition.
      ‘the dogs were turned loose on the crowd’
      • ‘He must have been a powerful presence in a variety of ways when you cranked him up and turned him loose in church.’
      • ‘He will be turned loose to rush the quarterback more often against the Raiders.’
      • ‘She stopped at that hand, turning Tara loose to run with the other horses.’
      • ‘After our many chores are done, Miss Windygale often turns us loose for a merry romp through the fields.’
      • ‘Still it wasn't a disaster yet, but it would mean turning Theophilus loose on acquiring the oil.’
      • ‘If the team takes Suggs, it will have to turn him loose to chase the quarterback to take full advantage of his skills.’
      • ‘So I start by turning him loose in a pen he's never seen before.’
      • ‘Well, if you make a tea out of the leaves, root, flowers, or seed of that plant, it will turn you every which way but loose.’
      • ‘Richie said he was pulling so hard to the pole that he was afraid he'd run off if he turned him loose.’
      • ‘He's the sort that writes your piece for you, whether you ask him questions and write down the answers or turn him loose on a laptop.’
      • ‘Coach Jon Gruden says Woodson will be turned loose more often as a blitzer and used as a slot receiver.’
      • ‘They also knew that there was no way that they would get their army if they were to just turn us loose and tell us to have children.’
      • ‘They gave me a lovely nametag and lanyard and then turned me loose in the gaming room.’
      • ‘By the time you are level, it seems that a model yacht has been turned loose on Sydney Harbour.’
      • ‘Coach Lefty Driesell turns 'em loose and lets'em go, and they know what to do.’
      • ‘When it got to this point in the game, this was the only time John could go out and turn everything loose.’
      • ‘Without a family or home or stable identity, she is turned loose in her community.’
      • ‘Rogers still isn't at full strength, and the team wants to make sure the problem is cleared up before turning him loose in practice.’
      • ‘When you give an order, you're actually turning someone loose.’
      • ‘He's great at delegating, giving you an assignment, and then turning you loose on it and not trying to micromanage you or second-guess you.’
    2. 3.2with object Pass the age or time of.
      ‘I've just turned forty’
      reach, reach the age of, get to, get to the age of, become, pass
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    3. 3.3no object (of leaves) change colour in the autumn.
      ‘the chestnut leaves were turning’
      • ‘I find joy, not in the material things, or not in achievements, but just the fact that I got to see the sun shine or the leaves are turning.’
      • ‘Give the tree a good top prune in early autumn, just as the leaves are starting to turn and before it gets cold.’
      • ‘Soon the leaves will turn and the ground will be ablaze with autumn's botanical fire.’
      • ‘No frost yet, so the leaves are not turning en masse; instead there has been a long succession of lovely sunny days and blue skies.’
      • ‘Autumn was only just around the corner but the leaves weren't turning yet and the weather still felt like summer.’
      • ‘As fall comes, and the leaves turn and swirl in colorful whirlwinds, we eagerly look forward to it.’
      • ‘Leaves are turning and are providing us with a beautiful last blast of colour before they fall and disintegrate into a sodden mush of brown.’
      • ‘At Brangayne Vineyard, the leaves on the poplars are turning and there's a sharp edge of autumn in the air.’
      • ‘If I see plants with yellowing foliage I have to stop and ask myself why the leaves are turning.’
      • ‘There is a precious week here in the north, when the leaves have turned and have not yet been shredded by the wind, and this is it.’
      • ‘The weather cools down, the leaves turn, there are new shows on Broadway, sweaters and coats in the shops.’
      • ‘Most pruning should be done after the leaves turn, indicating that the plant is dormant.’
      • ‘We will even see leaves start to turn - they will have to, with nights as cool as those we've had.’
      • ‘It sounds utterly inappropriate as the leaves turn, night draws in and Wales floods.’
      • ‘With summer now a memory, and the leaves beginning to turn, its time to prepare to put your boat away for the winter.’
      • ‘I thought about flying then decided that it would be a good thing to go on a road trip in the Mini in the early Autumn, when the leaves are starting to turn.’
      • ‘The leaves are turning, it is a beautiful scene.’
      • ‘Go away from the city, sail the seas, and not a leaf would have turned by the time you are back.’
      • ‘The leaves are beautiful and turning, but if you are stupid and young you can still go out without a jacket.’
      • ‘But when the air cools and the leaves turn, you yearn for something a bit more grown-up.’
    4. 3.4 (with reference to the stomach) make or become nauseated.
      with object ‘the smell was bad enough to turn the strongest stomach’
      • ‘My stomach turns a little at the greasy aroma; caffeine and wholegrain is the only menu I'm interested in.’
      • ‘Their stomachs turn, but he just carries on looking at the river running between his dirty feet.’
      • ‘My body shakes at every joint, my empty stomach turns and nausea rushes over me in waves.’
      • ‘His mouth salivates while his stomach turns for him to fill it with the warm food.’
      • ‘It could be anyone, but still her stomach turns, and she's glad when the man comes and Jimmy folds the paper, tucks it away and out of sight.’
      • ‘I feel sick, my stomach lurching and turning and doing a dance I didn't request.’
      • ‘I'm up at seven o'clock on the day of the game and my stomach's turning.’
      • ‘This month's Home Office revelations must turn even the stoutest stomach.’
      • ‘It's not a pretty sight, and my stomach turns when I look at him.’
      • ‘My stomach turns at the notion, but the real gravity of the situation doesn't sink in until a few minutes later.’
      • ‘On the one hand, appeasing awful governments turns many a stomach, including mine.’
      • ‘Your stomach will turn with anticipation on the drive over to SkyDive Toronto, located north of Barrie.’
      • ‘But my stomach turns when I think about my sister marrying that guy.’
      • ‘Just the thought had his stomach turning, and that had his anger boiling.’
      • ‘My stomach has been turning at some of the coverage.’
      • ‘The movie is very bloody, featuring close-up shots of cannibalism which are likely to turn the strongest stomach.’
      • ‘The sight of those five smug and arrogant oil corporation CEOs was enough to turn one's stomach.’
      • ‘I was more nervous than I'd expected and my stomach turned as we paused outside of King's Cross.’
      • ‘The story which unfolded over the past few months at Nottingham Crown Court was enough to make the most sturdy of stomachs turn.’
      • ‘The latest round of political maneuvering in Indonesia is enough to turn one's stomach.’
      nauseate, cause to feel sick, cause to feel nauseous, sicken, make sick, make someone's gorge rise, make someone's stomach rise
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    5. 3.5 (with reference to milk) make or become sour.
      become sour, go sour, go off, sour, curdle, become rancid, go bad, spoil, taint
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  • 4turn tono object Start doing or becoming involved with.

    ‘in 1939 he turned to films in earnest’
    • ‘All these success stories have got many Indian Americans turning to film production, with finances in place or not.’
    • ‘Philips, also a Fox contract player, appeared in a few more films before turning to directing television.’
    • ‘In the last few years of his life his interests turned to developing Shannon's ideas on information theory.’
    • ‘He studied psychology at the University of Leuven, before turning to theatre and film.’
    • ‘More and more cricket players are turning to commentary and journalism.’
    • ‘When film journalists turn to book writing, the result can be hilarious.’
    take up, become involved with, get involved with, involve oneself in, begin to participate in, go in for, enter, become interested in, start doing, undertake
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    1. 4.1 Go on to consider next.
      ‘we can now turn to another aspect of the problem’
      • ‘With the above background information in place, let us now turn to logophoric pronouns in African languages.’
      • ‘Later, of course, his Honour turns to consider this evidence which was right at the heart, far from being extraneous.’
      • ‘We turn to consider how those principles should be applied in the present context.’
      • ‘When the Special Adjudicator sat at 10 a.m. he referred to the Applicant's appeal before turning to another case listed that day.’
      • ‘Before turning to the Grounds of Appeal, it is necessary to give some account of the arrest, detention and interviewing of the three appellants.’
      • ‘Before turning to the application, we summarise briefly the evidence as taken from the transcripts of the summing up and the witness statements.’
      • ‘For further information we must therefore turn to an examination of the object itself.’
      • ‘With the jurisprudence in mind, I turn to the application of the factors to the case at hand.’
      • ‘In a flash, the minds of around thirty people turn to where their future drinks money will be coming from.’
      • ‘I therefore turn to consider whether the law imposes any limitation upon the exercise of power under the section.’
      • ‘Attention will then turn to the application of the general rights of liberty and security of person.’
      • ‘Considering that it seems to be the standard form of attire here, the conversation quickly turns to the appeal of men in suits.’
      • ‘I will now turn to the application of section 129, and the role of the Speaker.’
      • ‘But as soon as the discussion turns to application, the student would be lost.’
      • ‘When the conversation turns to this problem, reference is often made to the state secrets act.’
      • ‘With this information in hand, we now turn to several of the assertions in Isom's article.’
      • ‘Let us now turn to other ways to gain information about the ancient Greek mathematicians.’
      • ‘Finally, I turn to consider the practical consequences of giving the magistrates' court jurisdiction.’
      • ‘In the next chapter, we turn to a philosophy that insists that mathematics is inherently informal.’
      • ‘The 11 th chapter turns to research applications of flow cytometry.’
      move on to, go on to, begin to consider, turn one's attention to, attend to, address oneself to, apply oneself to
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    2. 4.2 Go to for help or information.
      ‘who can she turn to?’
      • ‘With the high rate at which formal employment is eluding many young people many are turning to the informal sector for a living.’
      • ‘No disaster can hit the world, without audiences increasingly turning to those new producers of information.’
      • ‘The women have no recourse if something goes wrong, no one to turn to for further advice.’
      • ‘We found it the most informative source we could turn to for a quick update.’
      • ‘Who do you turn to for news and information about science and health issues?’
      • ‘Lacking the funds necessary to purchase this relief through formal markets, one turns to the informal sector.’
      • ‘It is clear senior aides also encouraged him to turn to a referendum in his search for legitimacy.’
      • ‘However, I ask him whether the cancer and his great age have made him consider turning to religion as a comfort.’
      • ‘The fact that Sprint is turning to IBM for its application development appears to be a key element of the pact.’
      • ‘Flash training is always an uphill battle but there are many sources of information that one can turn to.’
      • ‘Though most victims remain silent, even those who turn to police find no recourse.’
      • ‘A small but growing group of Americans are turning to the Internet for objective information they can believe.’
      • ‘Chang also noted that a number of top information technology players are turning to Linux as an operating system for mobile devices.’
      • ‘Biologists are turning to information technology to produce critically needed efficiencies in their work.’
      • ‘It's not so much the BBC or foreign sources of information that people are turning to.’
      • ‘Some sites provide information which discourages patients from turning to conventional treatments for cancer.’
      • ‘In a desperate bid to save time and money, one consultant turned to voice recognition software.’
      • ‘The community turns to Florida Today as its source of information.’
      • ‘Anyone in dire straits because of the floods should turn to the official appeal for help.’
      • ‘Many are now turning to betting markets for better information.’
      seek help from, have recourse to, approach, apply to, look to, appeal to
      View synonyms
    3. 4.3 Have recourse to (something, especially something harmful)
      ‘he turned to drink and drugs for solace’
      • ‘In mitigation, the court heard he had turned to drink following a split with his wife.’
      • ‘Having said that, if I was denied a drink at the age of 20 I'd probably have turned to drink.’
      • ‘As a result, the villagers turn to the bottle, drinking to forget how dreary their lives are.’
      • ‘In despair he turned to heroin, later kicking the habit through a method of his own devising.’
      • ‘Boredom is also another reason for youngsters turning to drink.’
      • ‘Since then, he had been fired from two jobs, and in the face of rising pot prices, had turned to other, more harmful drugs.’
      • ‘Left on the streets all day and scorned would you not become depressed, paranoid, turn to drink or drugs or thieve for a living?’
      • ‘He subsequently turned to drink and drugs and speaks about his road to recovery.’
      • ‘It may also reduce the numbers who turn to a variety of unproved, and even harmful, alternative approaches.’
      • ‘To relieve her anxieties, Wong, 26, turns to a collagen fortified drink and forces herself to eat more fruits.’
      • ‘People turn to drink, people lose their families, people lose their wife.’
      • ‘And, it becomes a service of sorts as in the absence of the drink people turn to the illicit killer ones.’
      • ‘Tea or coffee are the two drinks most of us turn to first thing in the morning.’
      • ‘When stressed, she doesn't turn to cigarettes or drink, or even beating the hell out of the soft furnishings.’
      • ‘I turn to the other recourse for rancid times: the cultivation of my garden.’
      • ‘The court heard he had been a promising rugby player but had turned to drink and drugs when he was injured.’
      • ‘The thought was that people with low self-esteem turn to drinking or drugs for solace.’
      • ‘This is the reason so many journalists become cynical and grumpy, and more than a few turn to drink.’
      • ‘The trauma leads some to turn to drink or drugs, as well as having difficulty forming lasting relationships themselves.’
      • ‘As a comedian, I spend the days in sheer panic with my notebook, then at night I turn to drinking.’
      take to, resort to, have recourse to
      View synonyms
  • 5with object Shape (something) on a lathe.

    ‘the faceplate is turned rather than cast’
    • ‘In 1993, at the age of 81, Gunnar made himself a wood lathe specifically to turn spheres.’
    • ‘When Jonathan was 12, he started turning wood on a lathe.’
    • ‘He will turn wood on a lathe and tend the museum's medieval garden, which has plants for household, culinary and medicinal use.’
    fashion, make, shape, mould, cast, form
    View synonyms
    1. 5.1 Give a graceful or elegant form to.
      ‘a production full of so many finely turned words’
  • 6with object Make (a profit).

    • ‘The show cost its investors a socking outlay of $14m, but within 14 months they started turning a sinfully large profit.’
    • ‘To fill in spare time, he was devising new odds calculation programmes for football matches, which were turning him a neat profit.’

noun

  • 1An act of moving something in a circular direction round an axis or point.

    ‘a safety lock requiring four turns of the key’
    • ‘A quick turn of the steering wheel ran the car into two barrels filled with sawdust.’
    • ‘I need to make at least a 90-degree shoulder turn on the backswing.’
    • ‘Well, look at this term as a new turn of the wheel from which you could gain.’
    • ‘I turned it in my hand, gave the flint wheel a turn and the flame came to life.’
    • ‘The turn of a key in the lock makes me jerk away from my heavenly memory and into my brutal reality.’
    • ‘Each of these turns of the wheel was accompanied by fear, persecution, suspicion, and anxiety.’
    • ‘As I put the key in the lock for the final turn, my mother asked me if I was sad.’
    • ‘The answer is likely to depend on the political turn of the screw.’
    • ‘The engine stirred after the third turn of the key, emitting the guttural gurgle of a badly tuned rally car.’
    • ‘And that meant an extra turn of the screw in the Battle of the Church Chimes.’
    • ‘Now it just the turn of key or the flick of a switch that gets us on our daily journey.’
    • ‘Lower the ram a bit and screw the seating stem down three or four turns.’
    rotation, revolution, spin, circle, whirl, twirl, gyration, swivel
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A bend or curve in a road, path, river, etc.
      ‘the twists and turns in the passageways’
      • ‘This path has taken many curves and turns and at every point when there is a crossroad, something propels me in the right direction.’
      • ‘Then, as they approached the left-hand turn, he tried to get ahead, clipping the Ferrari.’
      • ‘Although it boasts the twists and turns of a single track road, it could have reached the same destination by motorway.’
      • ‘Kenny kept leading them around twists and turns and crazy bends in the road before they finally pulled up to a beautiful three-story house.’
      • ‘She had memorized the twists and turns of the path she took now.’
      • ‘This new circuit will allow for the testing of braking system performance in snow and ice conditions on sharp corners and twisty turns.’
      • ‘With 73 turns and a rise and fall of 975 feet, almost every conceivable dynamic suspension condition is encountered each lap.’
      • ‘The distance is less than seven miles as the crow flies, but is 13 miles by water, because of the twists and turns of the river.’
      • ‘The road is filled with plenty of twists, turns and curves.’
      • ‘She imagined how charming it would be to meet a handsome young man around the turn of the path.’
      • ‘What's more certain is that when it comes to understanding knots, the road ahead almost certainly has more twists and turns.’
      • ‘I know the road well so I know exactly where night-time leaves its sharp twists, turns and blind bends.’
      • ‘Sabrina went through twists and turns of the secret passage way.’
      • ‘Parenting, in all of its stages, is a path with mythic twists and turns - a spiritual adventure of the highest order.’
      • ‘The image shows a straight road ahead with no turns flanged by cryptic road signs jutting out at strange angles.’
      • ‘On a tight slalom course, we found it stable under power but a trifle squirrelly under hard braking into a turn.’
      • ‘That daunting task was made worse by plentiful leanings, curves, twists and turns.’
      • ‘At 56 feet long the vehicle should have had a struggle to negotiate twists and turns - but the sharpest of bends was taken with ease.’
      • ‘When we entered the city, it was all lit up with bright lights and the roads had many twists and turns.’
      • ‘Rogul led them through a maze of twists, turns, and secret passages.’
      bend, corner, dog-leg, twist, zigzag
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2Cricket mass noun Deviation in the direction of the ball when bouncing off the pitch.
      ‘the spinners have already begun to extract a lot of turn’
      • ‘The ball was turning today but it was mainly slow turn.’
      • ‘The wicket in Centurion didn't take much turn, and that helped us a lot.’
      • ‘It looks like Ozio doesn't have a lot of hand in the ball or as much turn as other people.’
      • ‘He ambles in gently, tosses the ball generously in the air, and extracts fair turn.’
      • ‘He played for turn, which is a dangerous assumption when Gilo is bowling.’
    3. 1.3 One round in a coil of rope or other material.
      • ‘The filament is helical, and has ~ 11 monomers for every two turns of the one-start helix.’
      • ‘Once you have completed about ten turns of the whipping take a sharp razor knife and cut the remainder of the trapped line flush with the whipping.’
      loop, twist, curl, hoop, roll, ring, twirl, gyre, whorl, scroll, curlicue, convolution
      View synonyms
  • 2A change of direction when moving.

    ‘they made a left turn and picked up speed’
    • ‘German Stefan Zoll livened up proceedings for the last half-hour with a few fancy turns and swivels but his remarkable failure to pass did little to aid Pickering's quest for a goal.’
    • ‘I found I could make quick turns without that uneasy feeling that the vehicle could roll over.’
    • ‘Adrian made a sharp turn with his wheel and got around Aziza, leaving her.’
    • ‘Then he made a right-angled turn, taking his four-wheel-drive vehicle out over bumpy grass.’
    • ‘He hears the squeaky wheel of a grocery cart behind him and turns.’
    • ‘We did hand brake turns and skids in an unbelievable ten minutes of driving, by a man who has been behind the wheel of rally cars for the past 13 years.’
    • ‘Take two sharp left turns, forgetting wife's advice that sharp turns may indeed cause car sickness.’
    • ‘Jurors continued along the track, with Mr Latham pausing to point out a site where a car would have been able to make a three-point turn.’
    • ‘We're going to make a left turn or a right turn, a complete turn right now.’
    • ‘There are the car races and hand-brake turns, not forgetting the obligatory ghetto blaster.’
    • ‘Again, the owner will probably get dizzy doing all these pivots and turns, but it's important to keep at it.’
    • ‘You wouldn't know where to start with a three-point turn if you had not been taught how to and had a go by yourself.’
    • ‘He claimed that he was making a three-point turn when Mr Darlington went in front of his car.’
    • ‘As you can see from the picture, there is not even any room to do a three-point turn, never mind a high speed stunt!’
    • ‘It was called Snap because whenever a marcher turns, pivots, or stops he or she literally must be so quick about that it seems like they literally snap into place.’
    • ‘If it's a driving test you'd probably be better off concentrating on your three-point turn.’
    • ‘It can even increase brake pressure on the outside wheels when braking in turns.’
    • ‘She gave an exasperated sigh as she turned the steering wheel to the right to make a turn.’
    • ‘I had aced my emergency stop and my hill start, and we were on our way to do a three-point turn.’
    • ‘Manouvere-wise I can do a three-point turn but the car growls at me when I'm reversing and I don't like it.’
    change of direction, change of course, turning, veer, divergence
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1 A development or change in a situation.
      ‘the latest turn of events’
      ‘life has taken a turn for the better’
      • ‘Ms Wilkins says until the unexpected turn of events she faced a grim Mother's Day.’
      • ‘Enemies become friends and friends become enemies during a surprising turn of events.’
      • ‘This has to be one of the most bizarre turns of events I've seen in a very long time.’
      • ‘In a surprising turn of events, it appears that he may do something right regarding immigration.’
      • ‘In a surprising turn of events, today was warm and sunny.’
      • ‘This turn of events scares the hell out of me.’
      • ‘But embracing their own intricate turns of temperament and giving up on feeling safe all the time is what gave Scott and Evan their music, and what gave us Lazersnake.’
      • ‘He admitted things seemed to have taken a turn for the better in recent years.’
      • ‘The case represents an unprecedented turn of events for Internet journalism.’
      • ‘In a sudden turn of events, Malik's family refused to pay his defence lawyers.’
      • ‘Events in the office continue to take a turn for the surreal.’
      • ‘As the group's fantasies become more ambitious, events take a sinister turn.’
      • ‘It is a turn of events even the most inventive Hollywood screenwriter would be hard-pressed to make up.’
      • ‘Alarmed by the turn of events the governments behave like spurned lovers.’
      • ‘However, events took an unexpected turn when Jordan kept her family waiting, arriving two hours late for the party.’
      • ‘In a terrible turn of events, someone has spilled beer on the server.’
      • ‘Phrases lead to complex, surprising turns and developments.’
      • ‘Soon, though, its songs take a turn towards William Blake and the Old Testament.’
      • ‘Industry observers say that the sudden turn of events in the industry has to be assimilated with a note of caution.’
      • ‘The firm is apologetic, and clearly ashamed at the turn of events.’
      improve, get better, pick up, look up, perk up, rally, turn a corner, turn the corner
      deteriorate, get worse, grow worse, worsen, decline, retrogress
      development, incident, occurrence, happening, circumstance, phenomenon
      View synonyms
    2. 2.2 A time when one period of time ends and another begins.
      ‘the turn of the century’
      • ‘Schreker's opera not as a work from a turn of the century long ago, but as a paradigm with very contemporary relevance.’
      • ‘Having dropped just three points since the turn of the year, the Sandhill Lane club are now chasing down a top-five finish.’
      • ‘However, around the turn of the 15th century, the practice began of having a small chorus sing polyphonically.’
      • ‘The first element of the vision was radical at the turn of the millennium.’
      • ‘I often feel I am an anachronism, that I would be more at home at the turn of the century than today.’
      • ‘There was no way we would be able to feed all the billions of extra hungry mouths come the turn of the century…’
      • ‘By the turn of the century, Al-Jazeera broadcasts could be watched around the clock on all five continents.’
      • ‘They also stepped up on their weapons cache since the turn of the millennium.’
      • ‘It's the turn of a new century and Dummies Theatre is in the mood for reflection, literally and figuratively.’
      • ‘By the turn of the century, smallpox had nearly eliminated the Haida people.’
      • ‘The guild was established at the turn of the last century.’
      • ‘I have a theory that this maybe a turn of the century thing.’
      • ‘The sandstone buildings date back to the turn of the century when terraced houses first became popular in Glasgow.’
      • ‘It collapsed during a storm at the turn of the century.’
      • ‘They were still active in Central Otago after the turn of the century.’
      • ‘After the turn of the 20th Century, the fast decline in the number of tigers was mainly due to poaching and hunting.’
      • ‘He will look to kick-start his season after just four victories since the turn of the year.’
      • ‘London's FTSE 100 index peaked at 6,900 at the turn of the millennium.’
      • ‘Barbershop singing originated in the US at the turn of the last century, when quartets would sing in real barbers' shops.’
      • ‘By the turn of the century, Buenos Aires was the largest city in Latin America, with a population of over one million.’
    3. 2.3 A place where a road meets or branches off another; a turning.
      ‘they were approaching the turn’
      • ‘Just as he approached the turn near the Talbooth restaurant, a black beast bigger than a dog but with the tail of a cat strayed across his path.’
      • ‘Alex had been driving during the night while Max slept, but somehow he'd taken a wrong turn in the dark, a wrong turn that turned into several wrong turns.’
      • ‘Garry said they drove from Darwen town centre towards Ewood and for some reason Sean missed his turn into Branch Road.’
      • ‘The new works have allowed an improved view of the approach to the turn and has widened the roadway at a crucial spot.’
      • ‘Running down the long corridors he took a wrong turn, crashing into a group of girls before he realised his mistake.’
      • ‘Whilst trying to get home yesterday we managed to miss the turn for the North Circular due to lack of clear signage.’
      • ‘After a short rest he started descending but quickly realised he'd taken the wrong turn.’
      • ‘Her next turn was four miles up the street, a right into a business complex.’
      • ‘In the other parts of the city, all through the dead ends and turns of the back alleys, Rocky knew his way like he had a map stored away in some garbage can.’
      • ‘I stuck to the Navigation Map which is easier to use than the north-facing map and also highlights your next turn at the top of the screen.’
      turning, junction, crossroads
      View synonyms
    4. 2.4 A change of the tide from ebb to flow or vice versa.
      ‘the turn of the tide’
      • ‘This week marks the return of an old friend, who comes to us now at the turn of the tide.’
      • ‘But when they see the accuracy of the position, we will see the turn of the tide.’
      • ‘The opening has signalled a turn of the tide for unionism in Australia.’
      • ‘On the second day the action again tailed off much beyond the turn of the tide.’
      • ‘But the last two games have been pretty dire, and we are all fervently hoping that tomorrow we will see the turn of the tide!’
      • ‘Nature speaks at the tide's turn, when all that drifts is gathered, going round again.’
      • ‘However, the tide of the war takes a precipitous turn, forcing Riley and his commanders to take drastic measures.’
      • ‘They have to be hauled during the turn of the tide, when the water flow is at a minimum.’
      • ‘We had to wait until next day and the turn of the tide to conduct the first dive on our newest wreck.’
    5. 2.5the turn The beginning of the second nine holes of a round of golf.
      ‘he made the turn in one under par’
      • ‘I love the guy who orders two hamburgers, French fries and a soda at the turn.’
      • ‘Woods reached the turn having dropped six shots in nine holes.’
      • ‘By the time he approached the turn, he had dispensed with his trademark cap along with the aura of controlled authority he usually brings to a golf course.’
      • ‘I had a match to play that afternoon as well and ran into Kassie at the clubhouse when she was making the turn.’
      • ‘She had four birdies on a bogey-free front side and led by four strokes at the turn.’
      • ‘The match was pretty tight on the front nine but I had a couple of really good holes around the turn and I pulled away.’
      • ‘The veteran Watson moves to two under as he approaches the turn.’
      • ‘Instead of a hot dog at the turn, eat an energy bar with a blend of protein, fats and carbohydrates.’
      • ‘The gap was still one hole at the turn, after a brace of deuces at the short ninth from Westwood and Haas.’
      • ‘It's a second bogey in three holes since the turn.’
      • ‘Not wanting to be embarrassed, I shot a 47 on the front nine and really bore down after the turn.’
      • ‘Not too shabby, but at the turn is usually the point where I would run into trouble.’
  • 3An opportunity or obligation to do something that comes successively to each of a number of people.

    ‘it was his turn to speak’
    • ‘Mr Wilson and Mr Nicholas stood to the side waiting their turn.’
    • ‘Last week, it was the turn of the Limerick Leader and the Buckley clan.’
    • ‘They sat to one side, waiting and watching as other children took their turns.’
    • ‘Commerce players eschew the polite taking of turns; instead they shout down adversaries to win commodities cards.’
    • ‘Is it the turn of successful businessmen to do something similar now to catalyse and hasten progress?’
    • ‘The Army decided it was their turn have a shot at Navy.’
    • ‘The guys all came up to get thirds and Christopher offered to take a turn at the cooking.’
    • ‘When his turn came to speak, Jacob pushed his feet as far as he could under his desk before he started.’
    • ‘Recently, it was the turn of one of my Foolish colleagues.’
    • ‘If a company wants money from the city, then one of its top executives can handle a turn at the podium.’
    • ‘I said we're all gonna take a turn, and you're gonna do it outta the kindness of your heart.’
    • ‘This is not surprising given the way each company also seems to take a turn being the industry darling.’
    • ‘CJ, who was sitting on the side waiting for his turn, waves, and she returns it as a half wave.’
    • ‘If you are lucky enough to roll 3 sets of doubles during your turn, you get to make up a rule.’
    • ‘Meanwhile it's the turn of some neglected sectors to dust down their accounts, ready for inspection.’
    • ‘The idea is to allow them to have more time doing other things - they will be beeped for the rides when their turn comes.’
    • ‘Finally, at around 1920, it was my turn, and I walked out into the field to be met by the pilot.’
    • ‘They spoke in turns and never interrupted the one with the spear.’
    • ‘Samantha stood quietly to the side, waiting her turn, wondering where Jeana and Jais were.’
    • ‘They sometimes pass them around during the service so another person can take a turn leaning on the staff.’
    opportunity, chance, say
    View synonyms
    1. 3.1 A short performance, especially one of a number given by different performers in succession.
      ‘Lewis gave her best ever comic turn’
      ‘he was asked to do a turn at a children's party’
      • ‘It was a very good cast, all in all, with great contributions from the male chorus, in hilarious turns as the rowdy serenading musicians and the police force.’
      • ‘It was engaging and unusual and loaded with actors taking new turns.’
      • ‘Stewart's like a young Jodie Foster, before that actress took a turn with Taxi Driver.’
      • ‘Their caustic relationship alternates between comic turns and hair-raising go-for-blood verbal combat.’
      • ‘His comic turn failed to save him from nine months' hard labour.’
      • ‘But this being a variety show, a concept as outdated as the acts themselves, at least the turns were mercifully short.’
      • ‘The finale featured solo turns by some of Glover's student devotees, young and old, and a joyous shim-sham dance by the entire cast.’
      • ‘But 2004 conjured up several memorable turns, including the likes of Billy Bob Thornton in Bad Santa and Tom Cruise in Collateral.’
      • ‘Michael J Fox does a good turn as the voice of Milo, and James Garner's Rourke is evil enough to be engaging.’
      • ‘The bank employees do comic turns, so they don't appear threatening.’
      • ‘Polak is a powerful presence in the lead, displaying remarkable physical and emotional range, while Treasa Levasseur is a standout in both comic and tragic turns.’
      • ‘In the past few years, those of us who've made this argument have largely been proven true, due to a couple of very strong turns by the actor in Chicago and Unfaithful.’
      • ‘This will be followed by what used to be called a ‘medley’ of musical turns, a bit of pop, extracts from West End musicals and a bit of classical music.’
      • ‘But he is bogged down by a terrible script - crammed with all that is clunky, cutesy and phoney - and surrounded by actors giving turns of pure ordure.’
      • ‘There are some quietly assured turns from Paschal Scott as Mick Flanagan and Noel O'Donovan as Dandy.’
      • ‘Benicio Del Toro does a marvellous turn as a mentally debilitated Indian.’
      • ‘As a child I used to love New Year's Eve because the holiday community to which we belonged built a bonfire, sang songs and did comic turns.’
      • ‘I stare through the comic turns, the cardboard walls and doors, the creaky plots, the clunking dialogue.’
      • ‘Rather, we thrill to the juxtaposition of four amazing actors trading turns as the literary lovers in their prime and autumnal years.’
      act, routine, performance, number, piece
      View synonyms
    2. 3.2 A performer giving a short performance.
      ‘Malton's comedy turn, Mark Poole, takes to the stage tonight in Cinderella’
      • ‘The news that the Queen Mother was in fact a comic turn grabbed the next day's headlines.’
      • ‘There's a fat guy in it who doesn't seem to be a comic turn nor a villain.’
      • ‘Then best known as one of the stars of The Comedians, Granada's popular showcase of northern comic turns, Reid was as surprised as anyone when he was asked to front the new series in 1975.’
      • ‘Rush is always an entertaining turn and the role promises to license a hyperactive nastiness.’
      • ‘To many in Scotland, Smith is just a comic turn and it's often taken outsiders to recognise her ability to do more than just drop one-liners.’
      • ‘A cheeky Scouse chappie, Kenny Everett, was making a bit of a name for himself too, but he seemed more of a comic turn than a jock.’
      • ‘She simply agonises over how to describe what she does when a camera is pointed at her, saying that she feels more like a performer or a circus turn than an actress.’
  • 4A short walk or ride.

    ‘why don't you take a turn around the garden?’
    stroll, walk, saunter, amble, wander, airing, promenade
    View synonyms
  • 5informal A shock.

    ‘you gave us quite a turn!’
    shock, start, surprise, jolt
    View synonyms
    1. 5.1 A brief feeling or experience of illness.
      ‘he has these funny turns’
      • ‘Harry thought I was having another one of my funny turns.’
      • ‘But she then started to experience funny turns and we cancelled the holiday.’
      • ‘But Auntie has been having a lot of funny turns lately.’
      • ‘I can have a drink with those sort of reactionaries whereas fascists bring on one of my funny turns.’
      • ‘In our study 25% of patients with funny turns had features on EEG that could be misinterpreted.’
      • ‘If one of them could take a funny turn just before the race, that would be perfect.’
      • ‘Suddenly decided to recheck my maths and realised I must have had a funny turn.’
      • ‘At one point, Currie found himself up by the patient's head, which gave him a bit of a funny turn.’
  • 6The difference between the buying and selling price of stocks or other financial products.

    • ‘Nearly all market turns show divergences between price and technical indicators such as momentum.’
    • ‘The turn most likely reflects rising import prices, a result of the dollar's drop.’
    1. 6.1 A profit made from the difference between the buying and selling price of stocks or other financial products.
  • 7Music
    A melodic ornament consisting of the principal note with those above and below it.

    • ‘There are no interesting harmonic turns, no unusual chords or harmony.’
    • ‘In the Romantic era, signs were still used for simple ornaments such as trills, turns, or mordents.’
    • ‘Here the many details, such as decorative turns, came across with meaning and heartfelt expression.’

Phrases

  • at every turn

    • On every occasion; continually.

      ‘her name seemed to come up at every turn’
      • ‘During the swim I came up against a challenge at every turn.’
      • ‘Kimberly and I remain at Junior Consultant level, banging our heads against the glass ceiling at every turn.’
      • ‘We're going to talk about positive issues, we're not going to be bashing the President at every turn.’
      • ‘Leading a university is no mean job, especially when numerous hurdles await you at every turn.’
      • ‘It was a mantra repeated at every turn.’
      • ‘There were pockets of shade at every turn.’
      • ‘As usual the world's best golfer has been second-guessed at every turn.’
      • ‘You start in the catacombs but beware ghostly ghouls at every turn!’
      • ‘He frustrated and defied them at every turn and encouraged other captors to do the same.’
      • ‘Taylor is surrounded at every turn.’
      repeatedly, recurrently, all the time, always, continually, constantly, on every occasion, again and again, over and over again
      View synonyms
  • by turns

    • One after the other; alternately.

      ‘he was by turns amused and mildly annoyed by her’
      • ‘Such dubious assertions are by turns annoying and unintentionally amusing.’
      • ‘It's charming and embarrassing, silly and touching by turns; mildly, reassuringly affecting.’
      • ‘His expression and demeanor are by turns grumpy and fierce.’
      • ‘Unfortunately, it was by turns thrilling and boring, with little else in between to savor emotionally.’
      • ‘It's by turns damning, hilarious, devastating and galvanising.’
      • ‘Miller is by turns noble and excessively solicitous.’
      • ‘The material, by turns dark and comic, is simply too extraordinary to embellish, and the book too extraordinary to put down.’
      • ‘This story in particular is by turns mean, funny, and raunchy and clever.’
      • ‘The man is, by turns, amused and annoyed by the presence of cameras in his midst.’
      • ‘Some students lined up outside by turns day and night.’
  • do someone a good (or bad) turn

    • Do something that is helpful (or unhelpful) for someone.

      ‘he was a friend of mine, and had done me some good turns over the previous few months’
      • ‘Maybe they could do me a good turn one day.’
      • ‘People are looking for the Cardinal to do them a good turn.’
      • ‘I hope that thinking about this sort of stuff does you a good turn.’
      • ‘We were trying to do Steve a good turn.’
      • ‘A journalist who, because she was from his own native county of Longford, decided to do her a good turn, found himself in court because Ms Johnson did not like the way her comments were treated in the Star.’
      • ‘Thought I'd do him a good turn and keep his business going for him.’
      • ‘He was a man who did us a good turn, and who's facing death because of it.’
      • ‘He does her a good turn and thinks he can then be done with it.’
      • ‘It's not just the money because they also did us a good turn as players.’
      • ‘They did her a good turn.’
      service, deed, act, action
      View synonyms
  • in turn

    • 1In succession; one after the other.

      ‘everyone took it in turn to attack my work’
      • ‘A dealer is chosen and deals in turn to the players and themselves four cards each.’
      • ‘These lures can be divided into three divisions, and I will deal with each of these in turn.’
      • ‘The team of four anglers took it in turn to fish the same swim and over a period of months took over a hundred fish.’
      • ‘The three of us went out to the landing, in turn peering through the tiny window into the lift.’
      • ‘The band are in turn calling themselves very important and very brilliant at the same time.’
      • ‘They had to shout bogies in turn louder and louder - the loudest to shout was the winner.’
      • ‘We each had a big bag of polystyrene balls and were taking it in turn to pour them out and ski down them.’
      • ‘Place the pears in the bowl of water and lemon juice while you are preparing each one in turn.’
      • ‘Each of us in turn would go down on our hands and knees and get a drink of the lovely spring water.’
      • ‘Cue much huddling and giggling and we all get to take it home for the night in turn.’
      one after the other, one by one, one at a time, in succession, successively, sequentially, in order
      View synonyms
      1. 1.1Used to convey that an action, process, or situation is the result of a previous one.
        ‘he would shout until she, in her turn, lost her temper’
        • ‘Fish, in their turn, get to carnivores and in this way poison gets into a man's meal.’
        • ‘They in turn returned it to the parish and it has been kept in safe keeping ever since.’
        • ‘The school system is a microcosmic image of a tyrannical society - the rich older boys rule the roost while the juniors bide their time, accepting the bullying, waiting to become bullies in their turn.’
        • ‘Shareholders issue these vouchers to tenants who in turn issue them to employees.’
        • ‘The depression of the pan would in turn lift up a valve and allowed water to flow out.’
        • ‘This in turn span the phone up into an arc whereupon I went to grab it with all the grace of an England fielder.’
        • ‘The Government in turn are guilty of neglect for failing to do anything about it.’
        • ‘For half the year this is a salt lake full of krill, which in turn attracts millions of flamingos.’
        • ‘They in turn would identify the relevant vehicle and stop it at a safe place in order to speak to the driver.’
        • ‘Front gardens have turned into driveways, which in turn have become mini car parks.’
  • not know which way (or where) to turn

    • Not know what to do.

      • ‘Julie is still trying to cope with her truanting, drug-taking son and she doesn't know where to turn to find help.’
      • ‘People are very annoyed and they don't know where to turn.’
      • ‘I am in a no-win situation and I don't know which way to turn any more.’
      • ‘The illiterate farmer doesn't know where to turn.’
      • ‘We are at our wits end and don't know which way to turn.’
      • ‘He finds his job as a currency trader empty, and he doesn't know where to turn.’
      • ‘In the fishing industry they don't know which way to turn at the moment.’
      • ‘How can I go forward when I don't know which way to turn?’
      • ‘We have teenagers that are really hurting today and they don't know which way to turn.’
      • ‘Our health care system so bewildering and impersonal that one often doesn't know where to turn or whom to trust.’
  • one good turn deserves another

    • proverb If someone does you a favour, you should take the chance to repay it.

      • ‘His eyes hardened, ‘Well, I guess one good turn deserves another.’’
      • ‘She stabbed him a season or two back and one good turn deserves another.’
      • ‘‘As I see it,’ the woman said, ‘one good turn deserves another.’’
  • on the turn

    • 1At a turning point; in a state of change.

      ‘my luck is on the turn’
      • ‘Today you can feel the tide of fashion on the turn.’
      • ‘The tide was on the turn.’
      • ‘It may be one of the great ironies of the modern economy that as the Finance Minister prepares to deliver a tough budget the global economy may be on the turn.’
      • ‘Mods continued to dominate both possession and territory for the next half hour but the Otliensians' defence stood firm, frustrating the visitors to such an extent that it was apparent the tide could be on the turn.’
      • ‘Maybe it's dumb to hope for better from Labor, but the way Crean won the leadership creates a glimmer that things are on the turn.’
      • ‘The fact that there are so many of them around suggests to some that the tide must be on the turn and that the only way now is up.’
      • ‘The long ebb tide in markets may already be on the turn after a fall of more than 30 months' duration.’
      1. 1.1(of certain foods or liquids) going off.
        ‘the smell of meat on the turn’
        • ‘Does Englishness elide into Scottishness in a sidling sort of way, like a pint of milk on the turn?’
        • ‘He returned the bottle to the fridge, which smelled strongly of Sue's garlic and vegetables on the turn.’
        • ‘Some of the effusions of the last ten days have started to smell slightly off, like milk on the turn.’
  • out of turn

    • At a time when it is not one's turn.

      ‘he played out of turn’
      • ‘They should have been disqualified for playing out of turn at the semi-final.’
      • ‘They would then complain to the referee that she had played out of turn.’
      • ‘The audience waits a little anxiously - no one wants to applaud out of turn.’
      • ‘One of the guards saluted out of turn, slower than the others, and he winked, deliberately mocking.’
      • ‘The player was red-carded for shooting out of turn.’
      • ‘Examples of discourteous actions are: shouting, freestyling, slapping course equipment, throwing out of turn and throwing or kicking golf bags.’
      • ‘There was an incident of batting out of turn.’
      • ‘If you play out of turn, your opponent may require you to cancel and replay the stroke, without penalty.’
      • ‘In stroke play there is no penalty for playing out of turn.’
      • ‘Anyone who plays out of turn should be disqualified.’
  • speak (or talk) out of turn

    • Speak in a tactless way.

      ‘she was the first to take umbrage if they spoke out of turn’
      • ‘There is the fear of speaking out of turn.’
      • ‘If the person had been speaking out of turn and was prosecuted for that, the matter would be very different.’
      • ‘Was it because she couldn't stomach being criticised for speaking out of turn on a delicate subject?’
      • ‘He spoke out of turn to the ref and was sin-binned.’
      • ‘They may talk out of turn.’
      • ‘However, we are not talking out of turn when, with respect, we congratulate Margaret Lawson on the 25 letters she had printed.’
      • ‘I was angry and probably spoke out of turn.’
      • ‘I don't think I am speaking out of turn by saying that I had words with the manager.’
      • ‘They don't want anyone talking out of turn.’
      • ‘He might have been just talking out of turn, but tonight might be interesting.’
  • take turns

    • (of two or more people) do something alternately or in succession.

      ‘we took turns riding the go-cart down the road and back’
      • ‘My girl and I took turns putting our fingers in our ears, or hands over our eyes during the scary bits.’
      • ‘They were taking it in turns to call each other big girls on their CDs.’
      • ‘The duo took turns writing scenes then acting each one out.’
      • ‘All four girls would take turns with the churn.’
      • ‘You and your partner should take it in turns, on alternate days, to be the asker.’
      • ‘The girls took turns feeding her by hand as she hung there.’
      • ‘We had two footballs and took turns lining up penalties.’
      • ‘Speakers then took turns to denounce the government, complaining of unemployment, poverty and corruption.’
      • ‘There were two other girls who were taking turns trying to get his attention.’
      • ‘Then they took turns to cook and watch spectacular sunsets.’
      alternate, take turns, take it in turns, act in sequence, work in sequence, trade places, change, switch, interchange, exchange, swap
      View synonyms
  • to a turn

    • To exactly the right degree (used especially in relation to cooking)

      ‘beefburgers done to a turn’
      • ‘All the steaks were absolutely huge and for the most, done to a turn.’
      • ‘Okay, how about young, tender vegetables grown right on the shore, picked fresh, and sautéed to a turn in hand-churned butter.’
      • ‘They were cradled in that fine, light French bread that had been buttered and crisped to a turn.’
      • ‘The pork roast was done to a turn.’
      • ‘Gideon Gaye's follow-up, Hawaii, confounded all those expectations but still managed to serve up a generous dose of thoughtful, evocative tunes, done to a turn.’
      • ‘It is studded with rustic croutons that have been crisped to a turn in butter.’
      • ‘And make sure the underpart is baked to a turn, so that it's all soaked in juice, so well done that the whole of it, you see, is - I mean, I don't want it to crumble, but melt in the mouth like snow, so that one shouldn't even feel it - feel it melting.’
      perfectly, just right, exactly right, to perfection
      View synonyms
  • turn and turn about

    • One after another; in succession.

      ‘the two men were working in rotation, turn and turn about’
      • ‘One form of liberty is to rule and be ruled turn and turn about.’
      • ‘The pianists, one German, the other Lithuanian, take turn and turn about, and the first five works alternate between violin and piano and piano trio.’
      • ‘A typically sage introduction from Cook follows in which, turn and turn about, he questions the significance of each of the key words in the book's title and in so doing introduces the topics that subsequent chapters will cover.’
      • ‘The Hatfields and the McCoys go at it, turn and turn about, until no one's left standing.’
      • ‘I distributed them equally between my four pockets, and sucked them turn and turn about.’
      • ‘Simultaneously, taking turn and turn about, the Maltese winch operator and SAR diver conducted the same evolution from the Lynx, all under the watchful eye of the Flight Commander Lt Gary Criddle.’
      • ‘When we got back home we started out on the task of scanning and correcting the prints, taking turn and turn about but, really, there's only so much you can do.’
  • turn the (or a) corner

    • Pass the critical point and start to improve.

      ‘the industry has turned the corner and things are looking up’
      • ‘When it comes to improving public schools, we are turning the corner.’
      • ‘We're only just turning the corner but Tuesday was a massive bonus for us.’
      • ‘We are now turning the corner and are looking for a turnover of 3.5m next year.’
      • ‘We hope that we are turning the corner with the president's tax cuts.’
      • ‘Consumption of red meat was now higher than it had been in the last decade, and the industry had turned a corner.’
      • ‘Are we turning the corner?’
      • ‘The games industry looks as if it is finally turning the corner.’
      • ‘Improved communication with the islanders has helped turn the corner.’
      • ‘Former pit communities in South Yorkshire hit by the collapse of the mining industry are finally turning the corner after years of decline.’
      • ‘All that is historic mumbo-jumbo as Indonesia now turns the corner and heads for a future that could well be the envy of many.’
      improve, get better, pick up, look up, perk up, rally, turn a corner, turn the corner
      View synonyms
  • turn of mind

    • A particular way of thinking.

      ‘people with a practical turn of mind’
      • ‘I do not think it takes a radical postmodern turn of mind to conclude we cannot reliably write much about the the mind.’
      • ‘Excerpts from the memos clearly show a conservative turn of mind.’
      • ‘He too is of a somewhat literal turn of mind.’
      • ‘Those of the atheistic turn of mind will look at things differently.’
      • ‘Being of an inventive turn of mind, Dr. Abrams set upon the task of developing the apparatus.’
      • ‘If no one in the village shares your interests or turn of mind, you'll never have intimate friends.’
      • ‘Her dancers share Streb's rigorous turn of mind and her taste for visceral thrills.’
      • ‘Jefferson, not surprisingly, was not of a prescriptive turn of mind on this question.’
      • ‘They had a little turn of mind that made things like that happen.’
      • ‘Sadly, she seems to have lost that adventurous turn of mind and decided to become an angry hypocrite instead.’
      bent, disposition, inclination, tendency, propensity, bias, way of thinking
      View synonyms
  • turn of speed

    • The ability to go fast when necessary.

      ‘the boats showed a very fast turn of speed’
      • ‘We know Shaun is quick on the deck with a great turn of speed but I'm quick as well and we have quick players in the team.’
      • ‘Add to that outstanding build quality and a turn of speed indecently fast for a diesel and you have a great package.’
      • ‘This ten oar open vessel also has an impressive turn of speed under sail.’
      • ‘Full-back Scott Paterson had shown a dangerous turn of speed.’
      • ‘He has a rare turn of speed and the ability to beat men in the tightest of one-on-one situations.’
      • ‘Their powerful engines pushed these race cars along at a frightening turn of speed.’
      • ‘Smart took the lead on the fifth lap and found an extra turn of speed to lap nearly a second faster than the rest of the field.’
      • ‘He is a good runner with a fast turn of speed at the finish.’
      • ‘It was Davis with the more rapid turn of speed who drove hard down the left hand side of the road, winning by a bike length.’
      • ‘Capable of a good turn of speed and equipped with very purposeful front bumpers the Stock Cars always provide plenty of incident full racing.’
  • turn over a new leaf

    • Start to act or behave in a better or more responsible way.

      • ‘The stores are never empty and the oligarchs have turned over a new leaf.’
      • ‘He appears to have turned over a new leaf - though how long it lasts remains to be seen.’
      • ‘Apparently the boy has turned over a new leaf.’
      • ‘A reprieved Dr Rob turns over a new leaf, and places an illustrated lonely hearts ad.’
      • ‘He seems to have genuinely turned over a new leaf.’
      • ‘It's the time of year for turning over a new leaf and resolving to be a New You.’
      • ‘I had these, but now I'm going to turn over a new leaf and that's all there is.’
      • ‘He is pleased to have finally turned over a new leaf and is looking forward to a bright future.’
      • ‘Is he turning over a new leaf?’
      • ‘Avery's response is to turn over a new leaf.’
      reform, improve, amend
      View synonyms
  • turn something over in one's mind

    • Think about something thoroughly.

      ‘he turned over in his mind what to say next’
      • ‘But Catholicism is not a matter of taking a random set of moral abstractions, turning them over in one's mind, and deciding that they're pretty good guidelines to live by.’
      • ‘Zareni turned the thoughts over in his mind, knowing he had to tell his companions and not knowing how.’
      • ‘Catherine pondered for a moment pretending to turn the thought over in her mind.’
      • ‘Geneva thoroughly turned this subject over in her mind and pondered upon it.’
      • ‘He selects each person here with care, patiently turning them over in his mind, studying them with his kind eyes.’
      • ‘As she walks away, he turns ideas over in his mind.’
      • ‘The man turns it over in his mind, chewing on his bottom lip.’
      • ‘He turned it over in his mind trying to sift it to see what it was.’
      • ‘He gave it due consideration, turning the idea over in his mind.’
      • ‘There was a long pause while he studied her, turning something over in his mind.’
      consider, contemplate, think about, give thought to, entertain the idea of, deliberate about, turn over in one's mind, mull over, chew over, reflect on, ruminate about, muse on
      View synonyms
  • turn round and do (or say) something

    • informal Used to convey that someone's actions or words are perceived as unexpected or unwelcome.

      ‘then she just turned round and said she wasn't coming after all’
      • ‘Mainstream society doesn't want us to turn round and actually contest why there's so much hatred and why there's this established conquering and dominating others.’
      • ‘I think that to turn round and say a member cannot do that is absolutely unfair.’
      • ‘This man, who I've known since we were 19, who saw me through my very worst years, casually turns round and tells me that the one brilliant thing I've ever done was his idea.’
      • ‘I just cannot believe that a guy who preached fiscal restraint for all the 1990s would turn round and, in order to get himself a name, would then bribe the economy with $3.9 billion.’
      • ‘When the school turns round and says we'd love to do that, but there's no money available to do it, there's not a lot we can do.’
      • ‘Of course, I could turn round and say it's almost a natural reaction, if someone goes in over the top on you, that you wave him off.’
      • ‘I am afraid it is no good any of us, and I include the police service in this, the PCA in other words, turning round and saying, ‘These decisions take an awful long time to come to fruition’.’
      • ‘And of course many carers make extensive changes to their life and to their finances; can they be left in a difficult situation if those people turn round and wrongly accuse them?’
      • ‘You write them off as beyond hope and then they turn round and say something that makes you wonder if they weren't right all along.’
      • ‘And that's one thing that we look at, when someone turns round and tells you that something is the case, turning around and saying - ‘well, is it?’’
  • turn tail

    • informal Turn round and run away.

      • ‘She turned tail and fled.’
      • ‘Many of the guests turned tail and fled.’
      • ‘Well-established companies have turned tail and fled the industry because it's just too tough.’
      • ‘David is forced to either find some courage quickly, or turn tail and flee.’
      • ‘Upon reaching the end section of low beddings we turned tail and beat a hasty retreat!’
      • ‘We'll call it a draw, and turn tail and flee.’
      • ‘I would have turned tail and fled from such a place had I not needed the money.’
      • ‘Both robbers turned tail and fled.’
      • ‘She turned tail to flee.’
      • ‘The diesel engine that shunts the little guard's van turns tail and pulls them home to Waitara.’
      run away, flee, bolt, make off, take to one's heels, show someone a clean pair of heels, cut and run, beat a retreat, beat a hasty retreat
      View synonyms
  • turn the tide

    • Reverse the trend of events.

      ‘the air power that helped to turn the tide of battle’
      • ‘The manager looked capable of turning the tide as he pulled all the strings.’
      • ‘They were widely credited with turning the tide of that war.’
      • ‘Howard's commitment to the community may be what turns the tide.’
      • ‘We will join with you in turning the tide against AIDS in Africa.’
      • ‘The National Commissioner said the police were turning the tide against crime and that this trend would continue.’
      • ‘A battle was waged which turned the tide of the Second World War.’
      • ‘The Code Talkers were honored for creating a code which was credited with saving thousands of lives and turning the tide of decisive battles in the Pacific theater.’
      • ‘They are slowly, modestly, turning the tide.’
      • ‘I am writing to you to ask for your help in turning the tide.’
      • ‘Villagers have succeeded in turning the tide of village shop closures by opening a community shop and post office.’

Phrasal Verbs

  • turn about

    • Move so as to face in the opposite direction.

      ‘Alice turned about and walked down the corridor’
      • ‘He turned about and gallantly he chickened out.’
      • ‘Kourin watched in dismay as Kellan turned about and began walking towards the mountains.’
      • ‘He turned about and walked over to Ambrose's body.’
      • ‘He cleaved the head off of an imaginary foe before turning about, parrying a blow by another imaginary enemy.’
      • ‘Phoenix turned about and walked.’
      • ‘She turned about, and draped her arms over my shoulders.’
      • ‘Atticus shook his head before turning about to face the remaining contributors to the conversation.’
      • ‘It is exactly the kind of scene that van Hoogstraten proposes as ideal for viewing in a camera, full of countless people walking and turning about.’
      • ‘She was turning about to face us and at last closing his mouth.’
      • ‘It simply couldn't turn about and reverse direction and position that fast.’
      change direction, turn round, change course, make a u-turn, reverse direction
      View synonyms
  • turn against (or turn someone against)

    • Become (or cause someone to become) hostile towards.

      ‘public opinion turned against him’
      • ‘He breeds death and destruction, and is turning Man against Man in his love of battle and war.’
      • ‘Their idealism turns them against, not towards, the party.’
      • ‘Olympias even managed to turn Alexander against his father.’
      • ‘Didn't she realize that by turning Kelley against me she was effectively stuffing up any chance of this family being able to function in a way that would be comfortable for all of us?’
      • ‘He turns Edward against his other elder brother George, Duke of Clarence, by libelling him with the suspicion of plotting to kill Edward, who imprisons him in the Tower.’
      • ‘She turned Queen Rosalind against her husband.’
      • ‘He had robbed Carol and now he was turning Francis against her.’
      • ‘She didn't want to turn them against her.’
      • ‘Sutton's probably back at the Post right now turning Justin against me.’
      • ‘Serena rejects the offer and Lil accuses David of turning Serena against her.’
      become hostile to, take a dislike to, become unsympathetic to, become disenchanted with, become disillusioned with
      make hostile to, set against, cause to dislike, cause to be unfriendly towards, prejudice against, influence against
      View synonyms
  • turn something around

  • turn someone away

    • Refuse to allow someone to enter or pass through a place.

      ‘tourists were turned away at the crossing points’
      • ‘She was turned away as caps are not allowed to be worn in the bar.’
      • ‘For some reason, we were turned away from several gates.’
      • ‘My passport says I have been refused entry so they may turn me away again.’
      • ‘We could not turn her away and allowed her in our walls.’
      • ‘Cleopatra enters, and he turns her away, saying that he wishes that Caesar will capture her and make a public spectacle of her.’
      • ‘We all know what Jody can do so we thought we'd test the water but we were turned away.’
      • ‘What if they are turned away?’
      • ‘Hospitals aren't legally allowed to turn you away.’
      • ‘Until recently it was almost standard practice that you would be turned away from hospital.’
      • ‘Reception staff turned her away.’
      refuse admittance to, send away
      View synonyms
  • turn back (or turn someone/something back)

    • Go (or cause someone or something to go) back in the direction in which they have come.

      ‘they turned back before reaching the church’
      ‘police turned back hundreds of cars’
      • ‘A group of 150 football hooligans were turned back.’
      • ‘Nez smiled, and grabbed Libratra by her sleeves, running with her towards the Police Department, where they were turned back by a CLOSED sign in pure black and white.’
      • ‘But they were turned back at Charles de Gaulle airport on Tuesday, because police claimed the groom's Kenyan passport did not have the right visa.’
      • ‘The tourists instead tried to cross a huge bridge blocks away, dragging their rolling luggage through broken glass, smashed bricks and trash, but they were turned back by police firing warning shots over their heads.’
      • ‘Three were arrested as the mob was turned back by police.’
      • ‘Fifteen hundred trucks transporting soya to Paraná's port of Paranágua have been turned back at the border.’
      • ‘‘Hundreds of refugees have been turned back at its borders in recent months,’ the statement quoted him as saying.’
      • ‘Its car was turned back from a police checkpoint near her house.’
      • ‘Military police were turning reporters back.’
      • ‘I slung my bag on my back and reached Will, turning him back in the direction we had come.’
      retrace one's steps, go back, return
      repulse, drive back, fight back, force back, beat back, beat off, put to flight, repel
      View synonyms
  • turn someone down

    • Reject an offer or application made by someone.

      ‘the RAF turned him down on medical grounds’
      • ‘You would not complain if you were turned down in a job application for health reasons.’
      • ‘We did advertise earlier this year and only had three applicants, two weren't suitable and the one we offered it to turned us down.’
      • ‘I offered to baby-sit and she flatly turned me down.’
      • ‘We met, he offered to buy me an ice-cream and I turned him down.’
      • ‘He made a casual offer and I turned him down.’
      • ‘We haven't done anything lately and you're constantly turning me down whenever I offer to do something with you.’
      • ‘One time he even offered to give her a massage, but Muriel turned him down.’
      • ‘But most of all, Anna hated the way she scowled at her every time she passed by, simply because she'd always turned her down on her offers to play doll.’
      • ‘Imagine my chagrin when, after a full-price offer, I was turned down.’
      • ‘He never asks for help and he turns you down when you offer it.’
      reject, spurn, rebuff, refuse, decline, say no to
      View synonyms
  • turn something down

    • 1Reject something offered or proposed.

      ‘his novel was turned down by publisher after publisher’
      • ‘We recommend that the proposals are turned down.’
      • ‘The offer was turned down by the United boss and has been taken off the table.’
      • ‘She was asked by her Physical Education instructor to try out for netball but she had to turn the offer down.’
      • ‘Chris and Phil turned his kind offer down.’
      • ‘Sheffield Council says the Government has not turned its plans down.’
      • ‘Again in 1862 he was offered a post at the Polytechnic in Brunswick but turned it down despite the offer coming from his wife's home town, as he did the offer from Vienna four years later.’
      • ‘Moyes turned the job down, just as he has rejected other offers from the Premiership.’
      • ‘He knew it would be offered again when he turned it down.’
      • ‘‘I think this was a fair compromise in the situation, but the department turned this proposal down as well,’ she said.’
      • ‘Both players were offered modest proposals and turned them down.’
    • 2Adjust a control on an electrical device to reduce the volume, heat, etc.

      ‘she turned the sound down’
      • ‘You can control what you hear, just simply find the spot in you where you can control the volume and turn it down.’
      • ‘When it is boiling furiously, turn the heat right down, add the slices of fish and cook them very, very gently for five to eight minutes, depending on the thickness of the turbot.’
      • ‘They told her how much they look forward to having a decadent TV meal on a tray in front of the screen, turning the volume down and just admiring the Scottish scenery for an hour!’
      • ‘I thought I could hear an echo, so I turned the volume down.’
      • ‘An understandably muted crowd turned the volume knob down another notch or two.’
      • ‘Even television commentators turned the volume down on jingoism after years of grinding the pride and the patience of other national fans within the British Isles.’
      • ‘At eight o'clock, I woke her and turned the heat down and the lights off and locked the trailer.’
      • ‘I sighed, turned the volume down, and returned to my drawing board where I was working on the umpteenth attempt to get my feelings for snowdrops down on paper.’
      • ‘Cover the skillet, turn the heat right down, set the timer for 10 minutes and leave to sizzle.’
      • ‘I turned the heat down in my apartment a few days ago, and since then I've made efforts to bring it back up, but it's still not quite kicking in.’
      reduce, lower, decrease, lessen
      View synonyms
  • turn in

    • Go to bed in the evening.

      • ‘Before you turn in, take a moment to pamper your skin with a night cream.’
      • ‘Lee was the last to turn in, but when he lay down on the bunk he felt poorly.’
      • ‘Still feeling the impact of my long flight from London, I am keen to turn in.’
      • ‘Alternately, before turning in you may like to embark on a quest to find the island's buried treasure.’
      • ‘Bangalore turns in early on winter nights, except for the few who frequent late night movie shows or night spots.’
      go to bed, retire, call it a day, go to sleep
      View synonyms
  • turn someone in

    • Hand someone over to the authorities.

      ‘police have appealed to his family and friends to turn him in’
      • ‘Her attacker was wearing an electronic tag at the time, and was eventually arrested and convicted - not because of the tag, but because a friend turned him in.’
      • ‘Then again, Marshall was one of my best friends, and turning him in would break our pact.’
      • ‘He knows that it is his duty to hand Maria over to the authorities, but he is unable to turn her in.’
      • ‘U.S. authorities are distributing flyers hoping someone there will turn him in, if only for the reward.’
      • ‘With his accounts frozen, he reportedly could no longer pay the expenses of his hideout in Venezuela and, unsentimental to a fault, his ‘friends’ and protectors turned him in.’
      • ‘He did rob a couple dozen banks when he was a cop before his best friend turned him in.’
      • ‘When he is caught, the boys decide not to turn him in to the school authorities.’
      • ‘We could turn him in to the local authorities.’
      • ‘The girl's family turned him in to immigration authorities and he was deported.’
      • ‘My heart split in two as my only friend turned me in for a crime I did not do.’
      hand over, turn over
      View synonyms
  • turn something in

    • 1Give something to someone in authority.

      ‘I've turned in my resignation’
      • ‘I had a strange thought at that moment that was entirely out of context: I wondered about mine and Calista's recycling project and how she would manage to turn it in if I did not return.’
      • ‘At the end of each day, completed evaluations were turned in to the facility coordinator, who was responsible for delivering completed evaluations to the materials management department at the end of the trial.’
      • ‘At KMB, mobiles unclaimed after three months are offered back to the person who turned them in and if they don't want the phones, the mobiles are donated to charity, a spokeswoman said.’
      • ‘The blank obverse side of the maps bear a list of the Obligaciones del Comprador-the duties of the purchaser-including, at the first signs of outbreak of civil disturbance, turning the map in to national authorities.’
      • ‘The study also points out that many students suffer by turning in their forms late.’
      • ‘I should be turning in the manuscript next fall for a spring 2006 release.’
      • ‘I had just told him that I was turning in and mentioned to him what I had found.’
      • ‘To this end an amnesty period of three to six months should be declared to allow those in possession of illegal unlicensed guns to turn them in to the authorities.’
      hand in, hand over, give in, submit, tender, proffer, offer
      View synonyms
      1. 1.1Produce or achieve a particular score or a performance of a specified quality.
        ‘he has turned in some useful performances for the under-21 and England B sides’
        • ‘The only other record was turned in by Cal, in the meet's final event, the 400 free relay.’
        • ‘In the boys division outstanding performances were turned in by Ian Alcee and newcomer Jervon Antoine.’
        • ‘Great performances were turned in by many members of the team.’
        • ‘In the first rotation, strong performances were turned in by three athletes.’
        • ‘Phenomenal performances are turned in from all of the aforementioned artists.’
        • ‘Some really good bowling scores were turned in on this bowling day.’
        • ‘Two of the most captivating performances are turned in by the young men.’
        • ‘Strong performances were turned in by Danys Baez of the Indians and Bret Prinz of the Diamondbacks.’
        • ‘Just such performances were turned in last Saturday by Lions Kurt McGinnis.’
        • ‘Other memorable performances were turned in by Tipperary's Declan Browne.’
        achieve, attain, reach, make
        View synonyms
  • turn into

    • Become (a particular kind of thing or person); be transformed into.

      ‘the slight drizzle turned into a downpour’
      ‘that dream turned into a nightmare’
      ‘in the next instant he turned into a tiny mouse’
      • ‘Taormina, once a lonely place, full of beauty, had turned into a friendly place, full of beauty.’
      • ‘The building which housed Britain's first ten-pin bowling alley was set to be turned into a family home.’
      • ‘The pack journalism of Super Bowl week always has the potential to turn into a giant game of telephone.’
      • ‘Then she stares at the stranger, her puzzled expression swiftly turning into shock.’
      • ‘The same situation in Angola, the two Congos, also in Cameroon, cinemas are turning into casinos.’
      • ‘In Vietnamese hands, the clear-eyed skepticism turned into willing credulousness.’
      • ‘In some respects, the trend toward greater tolerance has turned into a floodtide.’
      • ‘The city is closed down so their little jaunt to New York has turned into a nightmare.’
      • ‘Persons with an alcoholic relative are more at risk of turning into addicts.’
      • ‘Problems are glossed over, or turned into jokes.’
  • turn someone/something into

    • Cause to become (a particular kind of thing or person); transform into.

      ‘the town was turned into a thriving seaside destination’
      ‘every single good children 's book has been turned into a feature-length cartoon’
      • ‘The wine of conservatism continues to slowly turn into the vinegar of tribal ideology.’
      • ‘The very mention of India turns half your friends into travel Moonies.’
      • ‘For what we are going to do now is consider how to turn a theme into a plot.’
      • ‘The decision infuriated residents, who saw their once well-kept verges rapidly turn into wilderness.’
      • ‘Working throughout the year can turn revision into an absolute breeze.’
      • ‘More experienced or properly trained journalists could have turned the situation into an educational opportunity for their audience.’
      • ‘RE Anthony Hargrove needs plenty of playing time to help turn his potential into production.’
      • ‘In each case, we've restructured the game, turned it into a new game.’
      • ‘Well, eventually techniques will be discovered to turn adult cells into pluripotent cells.’
      • ‘Next, using ArcView desktop software, the operators turned the incremental data into 2 D maps for each table.’
  • turn off

    • Leave one road in order to join another.

      ‘they turned off the main road’
      ‘we turned off to the right’
      • ‘He said he watched as the boy racer turned off down another road then suddenly he saw Miss Concannon.’
      • ‘The cowboy stabs sideways with his finger, indicating he's turning off just up the road.’
      • ‘Josh turns off onto a quiet road, pulling over on the shoulder.’
      • ‘I turned off the main road, and took the short cut through the woods.’
      • ‘He was turning off of the road that leads to our house and a drunk driver collided into the side of his car.’
      • ‘At the point we had to turn off the main road north.’
      • ‘I'm heading into Weybridge and just turning off the river road to swing round in front of The Minnow.’
      • ‘When Simon turned off Bradford Road into a housing estate, PC Jones lost sight of him.’
      • ‘I got back in the car, turned around and went back to the road I'd just turned off.’
      • ‘He was later told to turn off the main road and ended up on a dirt track.’
      leave, branch off
      View synonyms
  • turn someone off

    • Cause someone to feel bored, disgusted, or sexually repelled.

      ‘the idea just turns me off’
      • ‘The reality turns you off.’
      • ‘If that kind of music turns you off then this is not likely for you.’
      • ‘I don't know what it is particularly that turns me off so much.’
      • ‘The terminology for this turns me off.’
      • ‘Like many other people, I was turned off.’
      • ‘If the idea of wearing big shapes turns you off, indulge in big accessories instead.’
      • ‘I was thinking the other day about what turns me off.’
      • ‘Some of you will be turned off by this whole discussion.’
      • ‘If you are turned off by exercise or are adamant that there is no time in your schedule to seek professional help or join a class, there are adjustments you can make to improve your back.’
      • ‘She was turned off by the overtly sexual messages of most of the men who wrote to her.’
      put off, leave someone cold, repel, disgust, revolt, nauseate, sicken, offend
      View synonyms
  • turn something off

    • 1Stop the operation or flow of something by means of a tap, switch, or button.

      ‘remember to turn off the gas’
      • ‘You'd need to press the ‘start’ button to turn the engine off.’
      • ‘I just stopped long enough to turn the gas off at the mains and then got out.’
      • ‘He pressed the stop button and turned the music off, apologizing.’
      • ‘The radio alarm clock goes off at five sharp, and of course I can't find the button to turn it off.’
      • ‘Its neatest feature is a little button that turns the wireless card off and on, so that it doesn't suck power when you're not using it.’
      • ‘She hit the send button, then turned her computer off and went for a walk.’
      • ‘She jabbed at the button to turn the alarm off, and it stopped its absurd shrieking.’
      • ‘The second button turns it off.’
      • ‘He found the remote with one hand and pressed a button, turning it off.’
      • ‘Hastily, he hit a button to turn the pager off.’
      turn off, shut off, flick off, stop working, cut, power down, stop, halt, deactivate
      View synonyms
      1. 1.1Adjust a tap or switch in order to stop the operation or flow of something.
        • ‘Visualize a stop sign - imagine closing a spigot - or imagine turning a light switch off.’
        • ‘Sure enough, someone - probably me - had turned the wireless switch off and I failed to notice it.’
        • ‘I looked at the switch and saw that it was turned off.’
        • ‘You turn the switch off chemically and it stops the production.’
        • ‘The purple haze shut off at once, as if a light switch had been turned off.’
        • ‘Timers, professors at the university have found, waste money since they condition students to never turn a light switch off.’
        • ‘He turned the switch off not even waiting for an answer.’
        • ‘But as soon as Chelsea threw open the great double doors of the stadium, it was like turning the volume switch off completely.’
        • ‘Princess Gwen growled in her throat, and turned the switch off.’
        • ‘How long can you stand to hold your child while he turns the light switch off and on?’
        switch off, turn out, put off, shut off, power down, flick off, extinguish, deactivate, trip
        switch off, turn off, put off, shut off, flick off
        View synonyms
  • turn on

    • 1Suddenly attack physically or verbally.

      ‘he turned on her with cold savagery’
      • ‘Suddenly Lily turns on her.’
      • ‘When his master suddenly turns on him, Little John barely makes it out with his life.’
      • ‘She tried to tear her away from the troopers, but they turned on her and beat her so badly most of her teeth were broken.’
      • ‘She physically turns on Helena.’
      • ‘Richardson then turned on a man who had witnessed the attack from his property nearby on April 4.’
      • ‘Suddenly he turns on the photographer, obviously annoyed that he hasn't been taking more pictures.’
      • ‘To her it looked as if the dragon had suddenly turned on Arvan without reason.’
      • ‘He said he feared for his life after the three men suddenly turned on him and started punching him.’
      • ‘Should he lose, it will be like a pack of wolves that suddenly turns on itself.’
      • ‘You have been parking there for two years you say and suddenly they have turned on you.’
      attack, set on, fall on, launch an attack on, let fly at, lash out at, hit out at
      View synonyms
    • 2Have as the main topic or point of interest.

      ‘for most businessmen, the central questions will turn on taxation’
      • ‘The case turns on a question of principle.’
      • ‘The battle between them is one of childish machismo and turns on the question of one of them being a rat.’
      • ‘The case turns on a short statutory question, all other aspects of the claims having been agreed.’
      • ‘We only decide important questions of law and your case turned on questions of fact.’
      • ‘That the question turns on the meaning of a passage from Scripture is not insignificant.’
      • ‘The outcome of today's application really turns on two questions.’
      • ‘The rest of the play turns on whether they will decide to live together, in Yorkshire or London.’
      • ‘In such a world there is no space for a communication without a topic that turns on money.’
      • ‘I think the case turns on a pure question of fact to be determined by common-sense principles.’
      • ‘The question turns on that vexed subject, the moral status of the human embryo.’
      depend on, rest on, hang on, hinge on, be contingent on, be decided by
      View synonyms
  • turn someone on

    • Excite or stimulate the interest of someone, especially sexually.

      ‘if that's what turns you on that's fine by me’
      • ‘This turns Alison on sexually.’
      • ‘It turns me on that a man can have the talent and power to make me laugh, loosen up and feel at ease.’
      • ‘That turns me on immensely.’
      • ‘Let me add what really turns me on about Vancouver.’
      • ‘I love football, it excites me, it turns me on.’
      • ‘I know she's sexual, I know I turn her on, I know she fantasises about me, and I know when I haven't seen her in a few weeks she gets very horny.’
      • ‘She wants everyone to know that Pete turns her on.’
      • ‘While it doesn't turn me on sexually, it does totally fascinate me.’
      • ‘What really turns you on or off in a prospective sexual partner?’
      • ‘You feel ashamed of what turns you on, or how you like to be touched.’
      arouse, sexually arouse, excite, stimulate, make someone feel sexually excited, make someone feel sexy, titillate
      View synonyms
  • turn something on

    • 1Start the flow or operation of something by means of a tap, switch, or button.

      ‘she turned on the TV’
      • ‘He turned it on, inserted the paper and pressed the start button.’
      • ‘If I turn it on now we will only trip the breakers and shut everything down.’
      • ‘It takes me forever to find the button to turn the television on.’
      • ‘I'm going to hit the power button to turn the television on.’
      • ‘Pushing the button to turn the radio on, I wondered what was in the CD player.’
      • ‘The right button turns the sight on, while the left controls reticle intensity.’
      • ‘Marie looks over at me then pushes the power button to turn the radio on.’
      • ‘You just press a button four times to turn it on and off.’
      • ‘The top button turns the power on and selects menu choices.’
      • ‘Cameras start recording without operators turning them on.’
      switch on, put on, power up, flick on
      View synonyms
      1. 1.1Adjust a tap or switch in order to start the operation or flow of something.
        ‘I turned the switch on’
        • ‘Alice's hand finds the light switch and she turns it on.’
        • ‘It's entertaining, but it also flip-flops your brain and turns some switches on and off.’
        • ‘This white wire will be made hot when the switch is turned on and will take the electrical power to the controlled outlet.’
        • ‘Vincent found the main power switch and turned it on.’
        • ‘It is a part of me and I cannot turn a switch on and off.’
        • ‘Rick felt along the back wall, and found the switch, turning it on.’
        • ‘I put the carrier bag down and reached to turn the light switch on.’
        • ‘Adele turned the faucet on and adjusted the water to a non-scalding temperature.’
        • ‘He said it's almost as if a light switch has been turned on.’
        • ‘Even when I turn the switch on, the shade is so heavy and the bulb so dim that the lamp only makes shadows of everything.’
        switch on, put on, power up, flick on
        View synonyms
  • turn someone on to

    • Cause someone to become interested or involved in (something, especially drugs)

      ‘he turned her on to heroin’
      • ‘A small town girl meets up with a leather jacket clad stranger who turns her on to the magic of rock n ‘roll.’
      • ‘If he turns you on to something that genuinely interests you, great.’
      • ‘This past summer in LA, he turned me on to what became my favorite places.’
      • ‘He has turned me on to so many new interests, as well.’
      • ‘I'm interested in making a difference in their life and turning them on to something.’
      • ‘The doctor should really be the one turning you on to this stuff.’
      • ‘Weatherall has turned Holmes on to much more modern electronica.’
      • ‘Recent trips to Europe have turned them on to how avant-garde what they're doing is.’
      • ‘She turned me on to so many things.’
      • ‘It still seems rather obscure that you were turned on to this particular video.’
  • turn out

    • 1Prove to be the case.

      ‘the job turned out to be beyond his rather limited abilities’
      • ‘The new year is hardly turning out to be happy.’
      • ‘Holding down two jobs and doing a part time course hasn't turned out to be very good planning on my part.’
      • ‘As it turns out, she is looking for a new job.’
      • ‘This turns out to be a hard job, as the island seems to be inhabited only by shepherds and smugglers.’
      • ‘It turns out there is a job available.’
      • ‘it turns out the pub is closed at the weekend.’
      • ‘There is, as it turns out, absolutely nothing to prove that the burglars were ever in the house.’
      • ‘Much that was Greek, especially much that was Platonic, was imported into Christianity in its first centuries; but even more impressive is what was turned out.’
      • ‘That may turn out not prove to be quite so beneficial as it first appears.’
      • ‘This turns out to be one of those jobs that you don't think better of until it's way too late.’
      transpire, prove to be the case, emerge, come to light, become known, become apparent, be revealed, be disclosed
      happen, occur, come about
      View synonyms
    • 2Go somewhere in order to attend a meeting, vote, play in a game, etc.

      ‘over 75 per cent of the electorate turned out to vote’
      • ‘The supporters have been turning out in force.’
      • ‘Squires is a popular meeting point for bikers with thousands turning out on weekends during the busy summer riding season.’
      • ‘They may even encourage more than half of the electorate to turn out and vote four years from now.’
      • ‘Cotswold people are urged to support their cottage hospitals by turning out to a public meeting next week.’
      • ‘In this sense, turning out to vote is always partly a question of attachment to a general sense of civic duty.’
      • ‘Since 1988, Canadians have been turning out to vote in steadily decreasing numbers.’
      • ‘They aren't the only old stars turning out for the meeting.’
      • ‘He suggested that they should be paid for turning out to vote.’
      • ‘The entire population of Radcliffe appeared to turn out for the town's annual carnival.’
      • ‘It is hoped that people will support this very worthy cause by turning out to watch what will be a unique game of football.’
      come, go, be present, attend, put in an appearance, appear, turn up, arrive
      View synonyms
  • turn someone out

    • 1Eject or expel someone from a place.

      ‘his landlord could turn him out at any time’
      • ‘This time I've got a clear preference that the incumbent be turned out, and a clear threshold difference with the Libertarian.’
      • ‘Her brother turns her out of the house.’
      • ‘He's dangerous and immoral and deserves to be turned out at the next election.’
      • ‘The voters would turn him out of office the minute the war was over.’
      • ‘In their arrogance they assumed that no landlord would ever try to turn them out.’
      • ‘He wouldn't be surprised if his uncle turned him out tomorrow.’
      • ‘One could imagine him twirling his moustache and turning his confrères out of the house into the snow for non-payment of rent, but this did not seem quite appropriate for a corporate lawyer who is aiming to steal the hero's company.’
      • ‘You would regret turning me out’
      • ‘I will turn you out of my house and send you back to your father.’
      • ‘He takes everything and turns me out on the streets.’
      throw out, put out, eject, evict
      View synonyms
    • 2Military
      Call a guard from the guardroom.

      • ‘The local magistrate read the riot act and 2nd Battalion the Royal Warwickshire Regiment was turned out to clear the area.’
      • ‘All of the Royal Guard was turned out for the Jovian envoys and he was in charge of it all.’
    • 3Be dressed in the manner specified.

      ‘she was smartly turned out and as well groomed as always’
      • ‘Ballinkillen's under-10 team were turned out in style at the county blitz finals against Carlow town recently in their brand new jerseys that were sponsored by a local Borris business.’
  • turn something out

    • 1Extinguish a light.

      ‘he turned out the light and groped his way through the doorway to the bed’
      • ‘It was here that we decided to turn our lights out to discover exactly what total blackness ‘looks’ like.’
      • ‘Sixty years ago the lights were turned out in this top secret bunker.’
      • ‘Before turning the lights out, he would get every one quiet.’
      • ‘They drove off down the High Street and I gave chase but lost them when they turned their lights out.’
      • ‘When the lights were turned out and the respective bedroom doors shut, I could be alone.’
      • ‘It was the first time ever in the history they turned the lights out on the Strip for a minute-and-a - half.’
      • ‘My senior year, they were telling me I had to turn my lights out?’
      • ‘The staff locked all the doors turned the lights out and went home at around 4pm last Friday.’
      • ‘She starts calling out to people to turn their lights out.’
      • ‘At eleven, Marie and Estelle turned our lights out.’
      switch off, turn out, put off, shut off, power down, flick off, extinguish, deactivate, trip
      switch off, turn off, put off, shut off, flick off
      View synonyms
    • 2Produce something.

      ‘the plant takes 53 hours to turn out each car’
      • ‘They have to churn, and I'm confident that when they turn that sausage out, it will be the right kind of sausage for America.’
      • ‘In all, 21,000 were turned out at a General Motors plant in Michigan, at a price of $10,000 each, where because of the war the majority of the workforce was women.’
      • ‘Most factory shotguns are turned out with stocks in the 14-to 14 1/4 inch range - adequate but often a compromise.’
      • ‘A rifle was turned out in 22 hours and 36.5 minutes.’
      • ‘It is the protagonists of craft who need to protect hereditary skills and ensure the same quality of work that was turned out three centuries ago.’
      • ‘The first big-screens with a quality picture were turned out by Mitsubishi in the late 1970s and peddled by retailers like Southern California's Paul Goldenberg, the self-proclaimed ‘King of Big Screen.’’
      • ‘As a workman he was most painstaking, and always insisted on the work from his department being turned out in the best possible manner.’
      produce, make, manufacture, fabricate, assemble, put together, process, bring out, put out, churn out
      View synonyms
    • 3Empty something, especially one's pockets.

      ‘Oliver turned out his pockets and spread out his loot on the ground’
      • ‘‘Would you turn your pockets out, sir? ‘said one of the detectives.’
      • ‘He pulled his jacket open and turned his pockets out.’
      • ‘His pockets had been turned out and money and a gold bracelet given to him for 25 years' service at work were missing.’
      • ‘His pockets had been turned out.’
      clear out, clean out, empty, empty out
      View synonyms
      1. 3.1British Clean out a drawer, room, etc. by taking out and reorganizing its contents.
        • ‘He'll be turning rooms out, one at a time.’
    • 4Tip prepared food from a mould or other container.

      • ‘Run cold water over the spinach to cool it quickly, then turn it out onto a chopping board and use a sharp knife to make a couple of cuts across it.’
      • ‘About 10 minutes before serving, turn the mixture out onto a plate, remove the cling-film and cut the ice-cream into wedges.’
      • ‘She used clear ‘Blomange’ to fill two fish moulds, turned them out and gilded them with gold leaf.’
      • ‘When the loaves are done, cool for 10 minutes on baking racks, then turn them out of their pans and set back on the racks.’
      • ‘If it is not cooked enough, it will collapse when you turn it out; if it is overcooked, it won't wobble and will be too grainy.’
      • ‘I made mine in a silicon mold, and stupidly invited friends for dessert before realizing that it would take several hours for it to firm up enough to be turned out of the mold and sliced.’
      • ‘When risen, turn the dough out onto a floured surface, divide into two and knead each piece lightly.’
      • ‘The pudding is turned out on a plate, the sauce pours down over the sides and a treat is ready to be experienced.’
      • ‘Remove the loaves from the oven, turn them out onto a rack, and let cool (at least a little bit) before eating.’
  • turn over

    • (of an engine) start or continue to run properly.

      ‘the engine turned over when we tried it with the starter handle’
      • ‘It shakes and rattles as the engine turns over.’
      • ‘The engines may kick back if the ignition is turned on before the engines start turning over.’
      • ‘As soon as he heard the Jeep engine turn over, he bent over the sink and spat the medicine out.’
      • ‘The engine whined but didn't turn over, and she felt blood trickle from her lip as she bit back a screaming tantrum.’
      • ‘With a spin of the crank handle the engine turns over easily and off she rattles on her iron tyres.’
      • ‘The engine ground a couple of times, then turned over with a growl I hadn't heard for a long time.’
      • ‘Once the engine turns over, it's off to the races.’
  • turn someone over to

    • Deliver someone to the care or custody of (an authority)

      ‘they turned him over to the police’
      • ‘They turned him over to police, where he's now in custody.’
      • ‘Does the defense minister really have the authority to turn him over to Interpol anyway?’
      • ‘If we were turned over to the public, I think they'd string us up.’
      • ‘He turned Jeremy over to the local authorities.’
      • ‘Well, after the ambulance came and everything was taken care of, I was turned over to the court system.’
      • ‘They should just turn him over to me, and I'll take care of the details.’
      • ‘We need someone we can trust, who wants to find Kate as much we do, but won't turn us over to the authorities.’
      • ‘I wish they would turn her over to someone who cares for snapped minds, and not expect me, who has no training, to mind her.’
      • ‘I shall not turn you over to any authority.’
      • ‘She's such an adept survivalist that you start wondering why her parents would turn her over to the care of so callow a clod as Charlie, who runs out of ideas shortly after tearing his downed plane apart in a futile rage.’
  • turn something over

    • 1Cause an engine to run.

      ‘remember to turn the engine over occasionally in the cold weather’
      • ‘I turned the engine over.’
      • ‘He turned the engine over and as they pulled away from the curb, he glanced at her before he concentrated on the road.’
      • ‘Turn the engine over in five-second bursts three or four times to allow the oil to circulate.’
      • ‘By the time I'm turning the engine over, it'll be too late for Dad to stop me.’
      • ‘‘The main task is to raise the engine temperature before we turn it over,’ explains Paul.’
      • ‘Inside, pausing to wipe and polish my spectacles before I turned the engine over and drove home, I listened to the faint sounds of water running off the car and dripping down to the pavement.’
      • ‘You have to turn the engine over.’
      • ‘It's the musical equivalent of a car that won't start, no matter how many times you pump the gas pedal or turn the engine over and hear that brief, sputtering roar.’
      • ‘He tried to turn the engine over again and to his relief it burst into life.’
      • ‘We have turned the engine over with the help of a battery.’
    • 2Transfer control or management of something to someone else.

      ‘a plan to turn the pub over to a new manager’
      • ‘I don't see the merit of turning any control over to him in the near future.’
      • ‘The county can't do the job itself, and plans to turn the hospital over to a private management team.’
      • ‘He turned it over to the Yukon Arts Council, which formed a committee to develop a program for the house.’
      • ‘Last night we had 39 assists and very few turnovers and tonight we turned the ball over a bunch without being pressed, and didn't shoot well from the free throw line and still won by 29.’
      • ‘They chose a ranch and decided to turn it over to a property management company to rent out for them.’
      • ‘I had thought that it was simply saying that such documents shouldn't be turned over, since turning them over would deter some future government employees from giving the most candid possible advice.’
      • ‘The organization promised to provide three years of support, then turn the center over for local management.’
      • ‘The taxpayer funded the building of the Auckland Central Remand Prison, and the previous National Government turned the state-of-the-art facility over to the private sector to manage.’
      • ‘They have decided to dodge responsibility for the company by turning its management over to states and private entities.’
      • ‘You need to extricate yourself from management and turn it over to people who are good at it.’
      transfer, hand over, pass on, give, consign, assign, commit
      View synonyms
    • 3Change the function or use of something.

      ‘the works was turned over to the production of aircraft parts’
      • ‘They were being cleared from their homes so that the land could be turned over to sheep, a process the estate owners characterised as ‘improvement’.’
      • ‘The three cardboard boxes exploded components all over the kitchen work surfaces and into the dining room, where the table was turned over to an assembly bench.’
      • ‘A strip of countryside either side of a country road has been turned over to housing.’
      • ‘Part of the current site will be turned over to all-weather sports pitches.’
      • ‘It seems every largish building without any modern purpose has been turned over to exhibition space.’
      • ‘The base was turned over to be a civilian operation.’
      • ‘The defunct land would be turned over to housing.’
      • ‘He sees a day when the countryside has been turned over to vast farming factories.’
    • 4Rob a place.

      ‘what about that girl's bedroom that got turned over?’
      burgle, steal from, hold up, break into
      View synonyms
    • 5(of a business) have a turnover of a specified amount.

      ‘last year the company turned over £12 million’
      • ‘James is the executive chairman of a diverse media and gaming empire which turns over almost $3 billion a year.’
      • ‘Not bad for a profitable 20-person business that turns over £2.2 million.’
      • ‘AWG Developments, which turns over in excess of £150m per year, employs around 200 people, mainly in Scotland.’
      • ‘He said Concorde, founded 25 years ago which turns over around £3.5 million a year, was enjoying great success in the spooling market.’
      • ‘This already turns over £45m and employs 80 people.’
      • ‘Now the bazaars are packed, traffic jams are common, mobile phones are everywhere and the money market turns over $10 million each week.’
      • ‘Do we want to pay up to 300,000 for a shop that only turns over 20,000 a week?’
      • ‘Today, Freshgrowers turns over about £10m and accounts for about ten per cent of the UK's carrot production.’
      • ‘Australia's textile, clothing and footwear industry turns over $9 billion a year.’
      • ‘Further education is now big business, and the College turns over 34m a year.’
  • turn something round (or around)

    • 1Prepare a ship or aircraft for its return journey.

      ‘cleanliness also shortens the time it takes to turn a ship round’
      • ‘Instead of 140 men taking two days to unload and load 16 years ago, a ship nowadays can be turned around in less than a day by fewer than 50 people.’
      • ‘Fewer inspections did not necessarily mean a ship could be turned around at a US port faster than before.’
    • 2Reverse the previously poor performance of an organization and make it successful.

      ‘the combination of skills and commitment in a workforce can turn a company round’
      • ‘Li said the company is now concentrating on consolidating firms the group has already acquired and turning them around, as many have not been performing well.’
      • ‘The performance reflects the progress in turning the company around.’
      • ‘Certainly, it's not everybody who can turn her life around successfully, but Wang possesses a flair for succeeding in whatever she does.’
      • ‘His appointment is likely based on his previous performance, where he turned the company around in a period of less than 24 months.’
      • ‘This is a company which has turned its performance round.’
      • ‘We have turned it around, performance-wise, but it is just about getting some points on the board.’
      • ‘Whether fine-tuning a business, or turning it around completely, this book provides the answers for successfully meeting your goals.’
      • ‘The 18-year-old, from Westlea, who has turned her life around with the organisation's help, says she is proof that the project works.’
      • ‘This new appointment is expected to help the firm turn its poor performance around.’
      • ‘Jim stepped back into the organization as president and turned it around.’
  • turn up

    • 1Be found, especially by chance, after being lost.

      ‘all the missing documents had turned up’
      • ‘And so how does it respond when a shell of sarin actually turns up?’
      • ‘As soon as it appeared on some bonus CD, it started turning up in ‘file sharing’ sites.’
      • ‘A large number of dodgy documents have turned up over the last month.’
      • ‘For sheer amusement, I plug names into Google and then see what turns up.’
      • ‘This piece of local history has never been available on video / DVD but occasionally turns up on TV.’
      • ‘Maybe something turns up in tests, or they don't want to go through with it, or they get a new job while the investigations are being carried out.’
      • ‘And Plato does not appear to be a nickname; it turns up frequently in the period.’
      • ‘Just occasionally something from the past turns up unexpectedly.’
      • ‘One stray shell turns up, a year after destruction of the regime. Where did it come from?’
      be found, be discovered, be located, come to light
      View synonyms
    • 2Put in an appearance; arrive.

      ‘half the guests failed to turn up’
      • ‘That's as bad as turning up at someone's birthday party without a present.’
      • ‘It's a clever comedic drama involving a birthday party, a video camera and an expected guest who never turns up.’
      • ‘There would also be no pretence from him if a guest either failed to turn up or behaved inappropriately.’
      • ‘You know how it is, wait for ages for something to arrive and several turn up at once.’
      • ‘Four taxi cabs turned up and another four would have arrived if Mr Banks had not phoned the cab company.’
      • ‘She even stunned guests at the Scottish Film Awards in Glasgow by turning up on his arm as his guest.’
      • ‘She failed to turn up and the judge issued the present warrant.’
      • ‘He is a ubiquitous presence, turning up when you least expect it.’
      • ‘The best present was son Markus turning up from London for the event as a surprise guest.’
      • ‘It took a while for the food to arrive but we had turned up early and didn't mind sitting in the sunshine.’
      come, go, be present, attend, put in an appearance, appear, turn up, arrive
      arrive, put in an appearance, make an appearance, appear, be present, present oneself, turn out
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  • turn something up

    • 1Increase the volume or strength of sound, heat, etc. by turning a knob or switch on a device.

      ‘she turned the sound up’
      • ‘While I could turn the volume up to 100% and still tolerate the sound, it was not something that I did often.’
      • ‘One of the best things about helping out at a theatre is getting to turn the sound up to eleven.’
      • ‘‘One problem most variable handgun scopes have is as you turn the magnification up, your eye relief shortens,’ Lalik said.’
      • ‘At the sight of a familiar photograph of the Interdimensional Gateway in Moscow, he hurriedly turned the sound up.’
      • ‘Stokes turns the lights up, and looks Daphne over.’
      • ‘They'd turned the sound system up, to compensate for the decorating noise I imagine.’
      • ‘Every now and then he turns the amp up all the way and tries to imitate moves by his favorite artists.’
      • ‘Reaching the water spigot, he unscrews the sprinkler head then turns the water pressure up full blast.’
      • ‘Nick motions for Anna to back away and he turns the television up.’
      • ‘I reached over quickly and turned on my stereo, turning the volume knob up, trying to cover up the sound of the clock.’
      increase, raise, amplify, make louder, intensify
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    • 2Reveal or discover something.

      ‘New Yorkers confidently expect the inquiry to turn up nothing’
      discover, uncover, unearth, bring to light, find, hit on, dig up, ferret out, root out, expose
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    • 3Shorten a garment by raising the hem.

      • ‘Turn it up and stitch it.’
      • ‘On a sectioned shade, clip the corners at the shade lower edge so they form a miter when the hem is turned up.’
      • ‘Sew all vertical seams, then turn the lining up into the skirt and catch it in the waistband.’
      take up, raise
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Origin

Old English tyrnan, turnian (verb), from Latin tornare, from tornus ‘lathe’, from Greek tornos ‘lathe, circular movement’; probably reinforced in Middle English by Old French turner. The noun ( Middle English) is partly from Anglo-Norman French tourn, partly from the verb.

Pronunciation

turn

/təːn/