Definition of truce in English:



  • An agreement between enemies or opponents to stop fighting or arguing for a certain time.

    ‘the guerrillas called a three-day truce’
    • ‘The government ordered its troops to crush the rebels after they walked out of a peace process and broke a truce last month.’
    • ‘There would be no truces or peace treaties, no draws.’
    • ‘Before she married on her 21st birthday, she negotiated over a hundred treaties, truces and allegiances.’
    • ‘Civil war continued, punctuated by innumerable truces and lulls.’
    • ‘Conflict was punctuated by several truces and by full peace between 1360 and 1369.’
    • ‘However, the nature of war is changing, and the types of wars that are now being fought could be influenced by international pressure to declare regular truces.’
    • ‘Peacekeeping operations are designed to monitor and facilitate implementation of existing truces or cease-fires and support diplomatic efforts to reach long-term political settlements.’
    • ‘This treaty was a temporary truce in the Anglo-French conflict in India and North America.’
    • ‘Gangs make alliances, keep delicate truces or live as sworn enemies with each other.’
    • ‘While this war has not ended, until quite recently a reasonable truce prevailed.’
    • ‘There were negotiations and truces and still more fighting.’
    • ‘Unilateral truces never work and we have ample history to prove that.’
    • ‘No Greek state was allowed to fight during the truces proclaimed for the celebration of the Olympic and other Panhellenic Games.’
    • ‘Even when some of his friends recognised the peace as only a truce he remained cheerfully confident that it would be lasting.’
    • ‘He may be hardening to win over militants who have balked at formalising a de facto truce.’
    • ‘Both sides accuse each other of violating the truce agreement signed last year.’
    • ‘There have been truces, temporary remissions, and zones of peace - but so long as anarchy prevails, there can be no end to the possibility of war.’
    • ‘But then the truce is broken and one of the villagers may have to venture out of the community and into the outside world.’
    • ‘They are relatively united behind the current policy - but essentially it's a fragile truce.’
    • ‘The narrative sources in particular are full of accounts of embassies and special meetings to arrange truces or conclude peace between warring bands.’
    ceasefire, armistice, suspension of hostilities, cessation of hostilities, peace
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Middle English trewes, trues (plural), from Old English trēowa, plural of trēow ‘belief, trust’, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch trouw and German Treue, also to true.