Definition of trousseau in English:

trousseau

noun

  • The clothes, linen, and other belongings collected by a bride for her marriage.

    • ‘This was also the period in which young women were apprenticed to seamstresses, to prepare their trousseau and be initiated into the skills of seduction.’
    • ‘She picked herself a fine trousseau and had it delivered to the ship which she had booked her passage on.’
    • ‘The trousseau had accompanied my mother on her sea journey from Scotland, a hopeless chest filled with the sort of frippery that quickly disintegrates in Africa.’
    • ‘Few disputed that a bride's personal items, her trousseau, went with her.’
    • ‘Besides, she's getting married soon, and I thought it would be nice if I could give her a wedding trousseau as a gift.’
    • ‘Ola was busy sewing and getting her trousseau together.’
    • ‘Also, since the target is the wedding season, designing for women makes better business sense ‘since women worry more about what they are going to wear’ and the traditional trousseau brings in plenty of revenue.’
    • ‘Gifts to the groom and the bride's trousseau and wedding clothes are displayed.’
    • ‘It's very lucky that Mother had started putting together my trousseau when William proposed to me last October, otherwise we would have an impossible amount of work to do.’
    • ‘We have a trousseau collection that will truly delight you.’
    • ‘The period between the betrothal and the wedding also allowed the bride to prepare her trousseau, while the groom could use the time to make preparations for the wedding.’
    • ‘In mid-fifteenth-century Florence, the husband typically spent about a third to two-thirds of the dowry on clothes for the new wife and furnishings - often well above the cost of the trousseau.’
    • ‘The decoration perhaps refers to the fact that such elegant pairs of knives are often referred to as wedding knives, and they were popular gifts for the bridal trousseau.’
    • ‘The trousseau of a young bride would contain twenty or thirty of these dresses, seven of which are worn, one on top of the other, on the ‘night of henna’ immediately prior to the marriage ceremony.’
    • ‘The best of every bit that goes into making a wedding trousseau will be here at the exhibition, she assures.’
    • ‘This is not a trousseau collection or even bridal wear.’
    • ‘In traditional families, a new bride's parents visit her in her new home on the fortieth day after the marriage and give her a trousseau.’
    • ‘It is the bridegroom who has to present a wedding trousseau to the bride.’
    • ‘People from neighboring countries fly down on weekends to finalize their trousseaux.’
    • ‘Her book is full of fascinating detail on trousseaux and privies, fireplaces and forks, underwear and bathing, mealtimes and much else.’
    collection of clothes
    View synonyms

Origin

Mid 19th century: from French, diminutive of trousse ‘bundle’ (a sense also found in Middle English).

Pronunciation

trousseau

/ˈtruːsəʊ/