Main definitions of trog in English

: trog1trog2

trog1

noun

British
informal
  • A person regarded as contemptible or socially inferior.

    • ‘For each of these guys are scores of others who ride, from the dirtiest swamp trog to the freshest flip technician.’
    • ‘He's your typical footy trog who inflates the language of football by injecting gratuitous fat-speak.’
    • ‘At the risk of sounding like one of those trogs who dwells in a cave, shouts UGH when a strange clan shows up and waves monkey femurs, and must wait 75,000 years before Nuance is discovered, I'll admit to being anti-enemy.’
    • ‘Where are all the not-yet-total trogs, but not still bling-bling homies?’
    • ‘Unlike him, I think top universities do have a duty to open more routes, but ministers should devise quotas that help the genuinely disadvantaged, the trogs of Hartlepool, not the trendies of Hampstead.’
    despicable people, despicable person, rabble, riff-raff, refuse, garbage, trash, vermin, good-for-nothing, good-for-nothings, undesirable, undesirables, the lowest of the low, the dregs of society
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Origin

1950s: abbreviation of troglodyte.

Pronunciation

trog

/trɒɡ/

Main definitions of trog in English

: trog1trog2

trog2

verb

British
informal
  • no object, with adverbial of direction Walk heavily or laboriously; trudge.

    ‘I left him trogging off to the tube station’
    • ‘But I haven't come along and sort of trogged around Hollywood begging for a job.’
    • ‘The guided Sicilian Volcano Hike will have you trogging up and around Etna for a couple of days, exploring craters and eerie lava fields, then cresting the summit.’
    • ‘He is happy to continue his apprenticeship with Gary, trogging up and down to Wales each week in the famous ‘magic bus’.’
    meander, make one's way, wind one's way, find one's way, pick one's way
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Origin

1980s: perhaps a blend of trudge or trek and slog.

Pronunciation

trog

/trɒɡ/