Definition of trixie in English:

trixie

noun

British
  • A bet consisting of three doubles and one treble:

    ‘I had a tenner trixie a few years back which netted me over £5,500’
    • ‘Rather than going for a trixie with today's multiple selections, I am happy to put The Hague, Sphere and Wee Forbees in a win treble.’
    • ‘Let's push the boat out and have an each-way Trixie at Bangor.’
    • ‘Try a trixie (three doubles and a treble) with the treble alone paying 38-1 at BetVictor.’
    • ‘I'm thinking of a trixie on FC Basel, Sparta Prague and Dinamo Zagreb.’
    • ‘John placed £20 on a trixie and was laughing when his selection paid £1611.25.’
    • ‘The Irish firm also paid out £8,000 to a London punter for a £40 trixie (three doubles and a treble) on three correct half-time/full-time predictions on Saturday.’
    • ‘Let's have an each-way trixie on the final day of Royal Ascot.’
    • ‘After careful textual analysis of the Christmas story, it's struck me that the arrival of the three wise men in Bethlehem is a bit like having a trixie on the football, writes James Milton.’
    • ‘Leyton Orient v Swindon, Gillingham v Rotherham and Hereford v Macclesfield are all closely matched on paper and it could pay to do a trixie (three doubles and a treble) on all three finishing level at 9-4 apiece.’
    • ‘The trixie would give us a nice profit should two win and if all three hit, the treble alone is a massive 40-1 shot.’
    • ‘Put a trixie on the first 3 horses - made a nice little profit on these!’
    • ‘The bet was a trixie, made up of 3x£5 doubles and a £5 treble for a stake of £20.’
    • ‘Ladbrokes settle two selections in different races as a double, three as a trixie, four as a yankee and so on.’
    • ‘I can make a case for the draw in all of them and backing them in a trixie, three doubles and a treble, could pay big rewards.’

Origin

1970s: of unknown origin.

Pronunciation:

trixie

/ˈtrɪksi/