Definition of trim one's sails (to the wind) in English:

trim one's sails (to the wind)

phrase

  • Make changes to suit one's new circumstances.

    • ‘Briefly, since the hour is late, let us take a quick look at what strikes the Professor as an example of an academic trimming her sails to the wind.’
    • ‘In terms of the existing business, the British market - which accounts for 28% of pre-tax profits - is the one most likely to force Goggin to trim his sails.’
    • ‘If we are sailors, we will have to trim our sails and put them up.’
    • ‘The courts have rightly trimmed his sails on that issue.’
    • ‘Whatever you might think of him and his ideas, it can't be said that McClintock trims his sails to match his audience.’
    • ‘We're hoping Congress can go on somewhat of a fiscal diet and start trimming their sails and stop spending so much money.’
    • ‘Smith has always shown an ability to sense which way the political wind is blowing and has trimmed his sails accordingly.’
    • ‘So I've sailed under false colors many a time, trimming my sails to the prevailing winds.’
    • ‘And Mr. Welch's singular skill has been taking fat, inefficient corporations and trimming their sails.’
    • ‘Yes, sometimes, especially when your job is on the line, you need to trim your sails to the prevailing winds - that's life.’