Definition of trim in English:

trim

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Make (something) neat or of the required size or form by cutting away irregular or unwanted parts:

    ‘trim the grass using a sharp mower’
    • ‘But, that would be a good thing, because they wouldn't have to trim hedges and cut grass, he noted.’
    • ‘This leafy stretch of colonial residences forms the western boundary to Augusta National Golf Club, and just beyond Gate Six, eight inmates of the state prison are trimming the grass verge on the public highway.’
    • ‘A local butcher will trim meat to your requirements on a one to one basis.’
    • ‘I had noticed this morning that Nia's fingers were long and thin, her bitten down nails neat though she only trimmed them with her teeth.’
    • ‘The end of the nail is trimmed to size and then beaten with a hammer to make it too big to go back through the hole and this riveted nail cannot move again without snapping off.’
    • ‘Who cuts their grass or trims their hedge in winter?’
    • ‘When it came to her diet, Randi decided to make small but significant changes: She started by trimming her portion sizes and adding a vegetable or a dark-green leafy salad to every meal.’
    • ‘Molina's crew trims hedges, mows grass, and has planted bougainvillea, jacaranda, queen palms and hibiscus.’
    • ‘After some judicious pruning, trim the rootball to size with your shovel and tilt the tree into the hole.’
    • ‘The sheets of paper are trimmed to uniform size and then joined with rabbit-skin glue.’
    • ‘As soon as it approaches proper beard length, I trim it.’
    • ‘A goat trims the farm yard grass just south of Five Corners.’
    • ‘With a French beard and trimmed hair, Mohanlal looks fresh in the movie.’
    • ‘Grapes harvested are collected in a shed, where groups of women trim the fruit into neat little bunches for about $1 day.’
    • ‘The situation mirrors 1996, when workers infuriated residents by trimming a patch of grass around the sign - after they added four feet to the height of the sign rather than get the mower out.’
    • ‘His fingernails were trimmed to a neat band of white.’
    • ‘The next thing you notice is his neatly trimmed hair, beard and the nice suit.’
    • ‘I went back to my very special hair care place, this time for a beard trimming session.’
    • ‘For the rest of the day, I trimmed my portion sizes.’
    • ‘I carefully full-length sized them and trimmed them to a constant length.’
    cut, barber, crop, bob, shorten, clip, snip, shear
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1[with object and adverbial] Cut off (irregular or unwanted parts):
      ‘he was trimming the fat off some pork chops’
      • ‘Its fat was trimmed away from the meat, then the meat from its bones, which were then wrapped in strips of its fat and roasted over a roaring fire.’
      • ‘Installation is difficult as you must remove door and trim a required amount off bottom.’
      • ‘Carefully trim off the excess using a hook knife (as used by carpet/lino fitters).’
      • ‘Transfer the brioche loaf to a cutting board, trim the crusts, and cut into 1 inch slice.’
      • ‘Wrap caul fat around layered rabbit, trimming off excess.’
      • ‘Excess fat, muscle, and skin are then trimmed away before the incision is closed with fine sutures.’
      • ‘Gently trim away any excess chocolate and set aside on a parchment-lined sheet pan.’
      • ‘The excess can be trimmed later if it isn't needed.’
      • ‘The group is also working on specifications for a free open-source tool that would allow administrators to easily trim unwanted information from their logs.’
      • ‘With a paring knife, trim the stem ends of the okra without opening the pods.’
      • ‘The new railway system is going to be small companies owned by labor cronies who can trim the fat as they see fair.’
      • ‘It's the sport distilled and folded and filtered into a perfect representation with all the excess trimmed off.’
      • ‘Examples survive of all of these, although the intention must have been for them to be obscured by painting or trimmed away in the completed manuscript.’
      • ‘Take several cuttings to allow for a percentage of failure and trim the leaves from the lower half of each cutting.’
      • ‘Sortings were anything trimmed away as scrap or considered of lesser quality than the writing paper eventually packaged and sold.’
      • ‘Wrap the caul fat tightly around the pork chops, trimming off any excess.’
      • ‘Carefully unroll the pen some, and trim away any excess clay (cut it a bit short - don't allow the clay to overlap).’
      • ‘Since the metal was still almost molten, Lona used a knife blade to trim away the excess.’
      • ‘If you are limited, you are forced to trim the fat and leave the good bits.’
      • ‘With a handy set of wire cutters excess can be trimmed.’
      cut off, remove, take off, chop off, lop off, shave off, hack off, nip off
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2 Reduce the size, amount, number, or cost of:
      ‘Congress had to decide which current defence programmes should be trimmed’
      • ‘I know that we've got to keep the pressure on the Chinese government to trim back the amount of army-owned industry.’
      • ‘For instance, some solicitors are required to trim professional standards in order to meet the firm's strictures on cost effectiveness.’
      • ‘The staffing levels and costs at the Darlington paper had already been trimmed to the bone to encourage a sale.’
      • ‘Indeed, in a time when companies are reducing inventory, trimming expenses, and cutting head count, maybe it is time to think about getting rid of certain customers.’
      • ‘That win reduced Johnson's handicap, which was trimmed yet further when she won the overall trophy in the Charity Medal Shield open to men, women and juniors.’
      • ‘There are quite a few areas where mobile costs can be trimmed, from controlling personal use through to getting the most sensible service for the executive traveler.’
      • ‘It is also reviewing design standards to see if the cost of the project can be trimmed.’
      • ‘For years, the health care industry had calculated that transaction networks were the best way to trim spiraling administrative costs.’
      • ‘The jungle of various direct and indirect subsidies must be severely trimmed and taxes must be reduced.’
      • ‘It added the move would be good for the company's cost base by trimming the ‘increasing cost burden of complying with US securities regulations’.’
      • ‘Eakins's 1875 picture of a baseball player at bat trims nature to the size of a playing field.’
      • ‘The program hopes to trim that cost to $58 million per aircraft by fiscal year 2010.’
      • ‘Costs have been trimmed, new technology installed, the product range reduced and the workforce cut from 18,000 to 7,000.’
      • ‘This isn't to say programs haven't been trimmed; some have.’
      • ‘Play is now restricted or curtailed with the par reduced and handicaps proportionately trimmed.’
      • ‘He's aggressively cutting costs and trimming his head count, research projects, and product line.’
      • ‘Jenkins wants to trim the evenings down to a manageable size.’
      • ‘Cutting staff and trimming capacity may rejuvenate many Japanese corporations - but not without cost.’
      • ‘A further 200 jobs are to go this year as part of an effort to trim another £15m in costs, the company said on Tuesday.’
      • ‘Indeed, few companies have faced up to the new reality by cutting staff, trimming offerings, or nixing expansion plans.’
      reduce, decrease, make reductions in, cut down, cut back on, make cutbacks in, scale down, prune, slim down, pare down, salami-slice, dock, retrench on
      shorten, abridge, condense, abbreviate, telescope, truncate, curtail
      View synonyms
    3. 1.3trim down[no object] (of a person) lose weight; become slimmer:
      ‘he trimmed down from twenty-two stone to a mere eighteen’
      • ‘If you're looking for a successful, safe and exciting way to trim down and lose weight, then Weight Watchers is available to you each week in the Ardkeen Community Centre.’
      • ‘You have spent the summer trimming down to photo-op weight, and are itching to get it on with that smiling angel from the West.’
      • ‘So what strategy does the Awesome Aussie employ to trim down to contest weight?’
      • ‘Now he's trimmed down to 209, making him even quicker, without losing strength.’
      • ‘At 89, LaLanne hasn't lost his passion for helping others trim down and shape up, either.’
      • ‘She joined the Slimming World group at St Mary's Infants' School and in just four months had trimmed down to her target weight of 9st 6lbs.’
      • ‘When exams are over, and summer begins, we become more active and trim down a bit.’
      • ‘In the nineties, action heroes generally trimmed down.’
      • ‘‘I will be taking up new assignments only after trimming down my physique considerably,’ he confides.’
      • ‘Not only do overweight men not want to trim down, those who are considered ‘slim’ are anxious to pile on the kilos!’
      • ‘He gains too much weight, forcing him to spend time trimming down when he could be refining his technique.’
      • ‘Meanwhile Jacqueline, who has trimmed down from 12 stone seven pounds to nine stone seven pounds, is delighted with her new-found figure.’
      • ‘It will build muscle, help to reduce the age-related loss of bones, get your heart and lungs working and trim down those hips and thighs.’
      • ‘Well, I'm happy to say I didn't have to do any trimming down.’
      • ‘But, since leaving the White House, Mr. Clinton has dramatically trimmed down and touted the benefits of a popular low-carb diet.’
      • ‘Interestingly, a somewhat trimmed down Dr Jules had kept his eyes closed during the minister's podium remarks.’
      • ‘Her success has spurred her teenage daughters to trim down too.’
      • ‘It means that those who pay their £6 for a full breakfast can trim down afterwards with a workout!’
      • ‘Ken Wood said the breaststroke queen had trimmed down and was mentally hardened for her Olympic gold medal bids in the 100m and 200m.’
      • ‘McDougle finally has gotten serious about his weight problem and has trimmed down and muscled up during the off season.’
    4. 1.4 Firm up or lose weight from (a part of one's body):
      ‘the machine is ideal for trimming the waist, hips, and thighs’
      • ‘He was put on a strict diet and exercise plan that trimmed away 39 pounds in 24 days.’
      • ‘I trimmed down your nose and face, and made you thin.’
      • ‘A moderate intake of the right types of dietary fats can help build muscle and, in many cases, trim you down.’
      • ‘Middle-aged and pot-bellied, RON GODFREY challenges a luxury York fitness club to trim him down…’
      • ‘Although still a big guy, he has considerably trimmed down his once hefty waistline and pumped up his upper torso.’
  • 2Decorate (something), typically with contrasting items or pieces of material:

    ‘a pair of black leather gloves trimmed with fake fur’
    • ‘The garment is often trimmed with lace, ruffles, bows and ribbons, optionally with spaghetti straps.’
    • ‘These particular pieces got trimmed with a wood edge.’
    • ‘Meanwhile, a beige high-collared swingcoat was trimmed with pink grosgrain ribbon, a favourite technique of Jacques Fath.’
    • ‘New Stockport Mayor Ken Holt made news in May by refusing to don the robes of his office during a swearing in ceremony because the robes were trimmed with ermine.’
    • ‘They're trimmed with jewels and marabou feathers.’
    • ‘The threshold of the door was decorated with gold and silver, while the russet, wood door was trimmed with diamonds along the small sliver of crystal window.’
    • ‘For example, if it is trimmed with rayon lace, binding, or anything else, this will become a slightly different color from the silk.’
    • ‘The robe is trimmed with ermine, which is the white winter coat of the stoat in northern regions of Europe.’
    • ‘He wears a fine long cape, and his sleeves are trimmed with fur.’
    • ‘It was midnight blue and the sleeves and neckline were trimmed with white, and the material was glowing in the dim light.’
    • ‘The blade was trimmed with a demonic red, with a dark orange being the interior colour.’
    • ‘Specially imported mohair cloths were attractively trimmed with black Persian lamb and real beaver lamb.’
    • ‘The hem was trimmed with white beads, and pearls and rubies framed the neck.’
    • ‘The woman's dress was of green silk velvet, and its collar and cuffs were trimmed with silver patterns that flowed like rivers of script in their endless circles.’
    • ‘The sleeves and seams are trimmed with reflective material that's usually found on running shoes.’
    • ‘Studies and a large hall were trimmed with multicolored marble, and there were marble statues on massive quartzite bases in niches.’
    • ‘There was one gown that looked almost large enough, but it was trimmed with lace and ribbons.’
    • ‘Her midnight blue dress was trimmed with cream lace.’
    • ‘The shirt was trimmed with sea otter fur along the side gussets, the neck, and around the cuffs.’
    • ‘The long, flowing sleeves were trimmed with lace, as was the hem.’
    • ‘But when deployed, the bottom edge - which is trimmed with a gasket - rubs against the painted surface of the rear deck lid.’
    decorate, adorn, ornament, embellish
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  • 3Adjust (a sail) to take advantage of the wind:

    ‘her jobs include trimming the spinnaker and dealing with the yacht's plumbing’
    • ‘The crew members would do more than steer quickly or trim the sails like speed demons.’
    • ‘The training schedule included inter alia trimming, starting procedures, current & wind, speed and racing strategies.’
    • ‘They can choose to either trim the sail, or get lost at sea forever.’
    • ‘David was meticulously trimming the mainsail when Howard stumbled out of the aft cabin and went up on deck, blinking in morning sunshine.’
    • ‘Children gain ‘hard skills,’ such as kicking a soccer ball and learning to trim a sail.’
    • ‘Svensson trimmed sail and continued on the course she had given him.’
    • ‘While trimming sails as a beginner, Pogell discovered that the sport was an ideal vehicle for personal growth.’
    • ‘With the constant need to hoist and trim the sails, sore muscles have no time to heal and joints are braced at awkward angles for long periods of time.’
    • ‘They trimmed the sails in out, in out, for hours and it made the difference.’
    1. 3.1 Adjust the balance of (a ship or aircraft) by rearranging its cargo or by means of its trim tabs.
      • ‘As the power changes, the airplane naturally trims nose-down, so the pilot trims up to compensate.’
    2. 3.2 Keep or adjust the degree to which (an aircraft) can be maintained at a constant altitude without any control forces being present.
      • ‘Next, direct the flight engineer to take over the engines and trim the airplane for the best climbing airspeed.’
      • ‘Chances are, your airplane was trimmed when the instrument died - and it won't go out of trim just because you can't read one of the gauges.’
      • ‘In trimmed flight the ATOS control bar is probably six inches further back.’
      • ‘As soon as the airspeed is steady in the climb, trim the aircraft to hold that attitude hands-off.’
      • ‘You can never find out if the airplane is really trimmed until you let go; then, and only then, can you see if you were holding an out-of-trim condition.’
      • ‘Out of the nearly 90-degree turn, I scanned the instruments and trimmed out the airplane.’
      • ‘You have to fly it all the time - it's not one of those aircraft that you can trim and then let it fly itself.’
      • ‘Because the control-stick steering was engaged, the jet was trying to keep one G on the aircraft and was trimming in the opposite direction of my inputs.’
      • ‘The airplane is stable and can be trimmed to fly hands - off, yet is easily controllable and handles well at all speeds down to and including stalling speed.’
      • ‘I trimmed out the aircraft and was setting up my instruments for the TACAN approach when I looked up to see something very bad.’
      • ‘If the airplane is properly trimmed, the correct stick position is held automatically, and no pressure need be exerted.’
      • ‘A properly trimmed airplane will do its best to maintain a constant speed should the pilot become momentarily distracted.’
    3. 3.3[no object] Adapt one's views to the prevailing political trends for personal advancement.
      • ‘Nevertheless, like his early hero Gladstone, he refused to trim his sails.’
      • ‘The Catholic church is not a political party, trimming to pick up votes.’
      • ‘Pick a politician who did not trim and you find huge flaws alongside great strengths.’
      • ‘Old Labour leader George, torn apart by the contradictions that have led to this riot, suddenly thinks he sees who is to blame, and drops his trimming and concession-making approach.’
      • ‘Vocal in their condemnation of divorce and of the divorced, they have a convenient arrangement whereby people can trim and, well, lie, in order to pretend that a marriage didn't exist.’
      • ‘The resolution was sponsored by the United States, though trimmed and weakened under pressure from various security Council members.’
      • ‘There are only rare occasions when government policy is abandoned or trimmed.’
  • 4informal, dated Get the better of (someone), typically by cheating them out of money.

  • 5informal, dated Rebuke (someone) angrily.

    rebuke, reprimand, reproach, reprove, admonish, remonstrate with, chastise, chide, upbraid, take to task, pull up, castigate, lambaste, read someone the riot act, give someone a piece of one's mind, go on at, haul over the coals, criticize, censure
    View synonyms

noun

  • 1Additional decoration, typically along the edges of something and in contrasting colour or material:

    ‘a red blazer with gold trim’
    [count noun] ‘the buildings were off-white with a blue trim’
    • ‘Gold trim and decorations accented the burgundy, and made the place seem cosy.’
    • ‘Exposed edges should be fastened to floor surfaces with trim along that edge.’
    • ‘The Coach Gallery Tote with new design details and fabrications is offered in both leather and suede with updated details such as patent and vachetta trim.’
    • ‘Cut the ribbing, ribbed-band or self-fabric trim a little shorter than the edge to be finished.’
    • ‘Replacing the green and white away kit of old, this new strip - again made by Admiral - has thick blue flashes with red trims down the sides of the sleeves and shorts.’
    • ‘Then I noticed the little blue book with gold trim lying on the counter.’
    • ‘When they are in the light times, they dress in fine apparel with bright colours and gold trim.’
    • ‘It was a royal blue colour with a bit of gold trim.’
    • ‘For most of the day I work on that one spot, taping along the marble trim, sealing the edge of the tape, painting and then repainting the bands.’
    • ‘In the south one-story, whitewashed, flat-roofed houses with blue trim around the windows and doorways are common.’
    • ‘The bride wore a traditional off-the-shoulder ivory dress, with train and sequin detail, and a waist-length veil with pearls and gold trim.’
    • ‘Made of 100% cotton fine jersey, it features contrast neck and cuff trim.’
    • ‘He was clad in a blindingly white suit, with gold trim and edges.’
    • ‘Seats are extremely comfy and come in a stylishly patterned material with darker charcoal trim.’
    • ‘The walls are a pretty light blue, and there is trim along the ceiling that matches: it's a darker blue, with black swirls running through it.’
    • ‘It was rather an elaborate military uniform, with golden tassels on the edge of its golden epaulettes and gold trim on the cuffs and collar.’
    • ‘Take your next cue from the mannequins seen in store windows: Stitch rows of ribbon and other trims along the bottom edges.’
    • ‘He was thin, lithe and athletic and was dressed in dark blue trousers and tunic with embroidered trim, and a gold coloured lanyard hung from one shoulder.’
    • ‘Finally it pulled out a stunning white dress with gold trim and ornate decorations.’
    • ‘While the front of the stage was visible, upstage was hidden behind patched curtains of a faded blue with gold trim.’
    decoration, trimming, ornamentation, adornment, embellishment
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    1. 1.1 Decorative additions to a vehicle, typically the upholstery or interior lining of a car:
      ‘refinements such as air conditioning and leather trim’
      • ‘And you should see the quality of the interior trim.’
      • ‘The company's chief products are door handles, underhood bottles and interior trim components.’
      • ‘The Limited also has steering-wheel wood trim, a power rear sunshade, and bumper moldings with chrome-inserts.’
      • ‘The dashboard and interior trim have been designed to set a new benchmark for the segment in terms of touch and feel quality, adding a new notion of prestige to the C-segment.’
      • ‘But behind the traditional leather and wood trim hide a multitude of high-tech systems.’
      • ‘The customised automobile had a high roofline, a stainless steel trim, brown leather seats and a sleek exterior.’
      • ‘There's tasteful use of wood trim and leather throughout the plush cabin.’
      • ‘The car has a completely new dashboard and interior trim, with echoes of the TT sportster.’
      • ‘Dismantlers are always a good source of interior and exterior trim (though bumpers are often the first thing to go in an accident).’
      • ‘Full hide trim finished in a light grey make for a pleasantly unclaustrophobic cabin.’
      • ‘Improvements to the interior include new upholstery and trim.’
      • ‘It includes a magnesium cross car beam, electronics, climate system, steering column and trim.’
      • ‘On another occasion four wheel trims costing a total of £100 were stolen.’
      • ‘It appeared sleek and comfortable in bright blue with white trim in contrast to the worn looking Communist era rolling stock nearby.’
      • ‘So perhaps it could be sporty in terms of interior trim.’
      • ‘Electric windows, decent stereo and leather trim for the steering wheel were all thrown in.’
      • ‘It was said to have a distinctive red trim around the wheel arches and hub cap.’
      • ‘Fine leather and decorative trim of ash-wood and aluminium add to the feel-good atmosphere.’
      • ‘Buyers instead are often driving off with equipment or interior trim or even a paint color that they don't really want.’
      • ‘The cabin is spacious, and the test vehicle came with leather trim and electrically operated front seats as optional extras.’
  • 2[count noun] An act of cutting something in order to neaten it:

    ‘his hair needs a trim’
    • ‘As you can see from my photograph, I'm in dire need of a trim.’
    • ‘Ah well, a radical trim of the lower layers of the bushes is called for, so that the cats can't hide there.’
    • ‘A TOP hairstylist is grooming his customers to help Manchester's tram network while they get a trim.’
    • ‘I don't * want * to go to a salon that I can only trust to give me a trim.’
    • ‘His brown hair needed a trim even as it curled darkly over the color of his faded green shirt.’
    • ‘Hedges will respond best to regular trims, while there are plenty of products on the market to keep wood and metal fences looking their best.’
    • ‘Oh, normal people would call that a trim, but if I have less hair at the end, it's a cut.’
    • ‘If the edge was good last year all that is needed is a trim with a hedge clippers or edging shears.’
    • ‘Have regular trims to get the bonce in shape and remember to plan ahead.’
    • ‘Yet even a quick trim of the back lawn went reasonably well.’
    • ‘Regular trims, conditioners and hair treatments all keep locks in the tip-top shape you want.’
    • ‘Parts of lawn that yet retain their dew on the hottest winter days are resting from brutal trims.’
    • ‘We stumble across a dogs' hairdresser and watch through the window fascinated as a pooch gets a shampoo and blow dry after a quick trim, presumably to cope with the heat.’
    • ‘Speaking of hair that needed a trim, Liam had really let himself go.’
    • ‘Consequently, my hair has gone too long without at least a trim.’
    • ‘Then there are the hedges themselves, which will very soon need a trim.’
    • ‘He looked a little messy, with his hair desperately needing a trim as it was always ruffled.’
    • ‘I ended up getting only a trim cause my hair stylist liked my long hair a lot.’
    • ‘I noticed my goatee needed a bit of a trim, so I shaved one side of it so it looked a bit more even.’
    • ‘Across the yard Arnie was attaching a huge set of roller cutters to a tractor, preparing to give the second fairway a quick trim.’
    haircut, cut, barbering, clip, snip
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1 A short piece of film cut out during the final editing stage.
      • ‘I did all the little things that needed to be done in the editing room, like organizing all the trims.’
      • ‘In addition, we get some deleted scenes, about ten minutes in total, which highlight tidbits and trims made to thin out the running time.’
      • ‘There are a few deleted scenes, but for the most part these are trims and pieces of footage that the Association most likely made them cut.’
      • ‘What we do get is a collection of about 24 additional out-takes and deleted scenes, a chance to see the trims and edits that went into creating some of the film's best sequences.’
  • 3The state of being in good order or condition:

    ‘no one had been there for months—everything was out of trim’
    • ‘To have a chance of defeating this president, they must get their party into fighting trim.’
    • ‘This company isn't just back in fighting trim - it's stronger than ever.’
    • ‘Keep in fighting trim, people; we will be needing you soon.’
    • ‘Keep your claws in trim: this contains more or less everything that is useful for a manicure or pedicure.’
    • ‘His counterpart was a short, compact man, obviously in the type of shape and trim that came from self-indulgent working out.’
    shape, fitness, physical fitness, health, state of health
    View synonyms
  • 4The degree to which an aircraft can be maintained at a constant altitude without any control forces being present:

    ‘the pilot's only problem was the need to constantly readjust the trim’
    • ‘Means had to hand-fly the aircraft without any trim.’
    • ‘As with most aircraft stabilizer trim arrangements, the primary system consists of two switches on the yoke.’
    • ‘Use the rudder trim to help relieve the forces on your leg, but don't forget to zero out the trim on final.’
    • ‘Pitch was the only axis of trim, and the control was mounted on the roof and activated by a horizontal crank.’
    • ‘Low-speed handling provides the student pilot with minimal trim changes when the flaps and gear are retracted or extended.’
    • ‘Force trim enables the pilot to reduce the control forces to zero.’
    • ‘As we slowed to do a controllability check, I needed almost the entire amount of available up trim to hold the jet level, but things still were manageable.’
    • ‘Part of the reason is that during this test flight, primary trim pitch control aboard the aircraft was lost.’
    • ‘On the first flight we almost had the perfect trim.’
    • ‘The aircraft had no trim and no attitude gyros; the only reference was the standby gyro.’
    • ‘Proper trim is essential for maintaining this balance.’
    • ‘The manufacturer recommends alternating tanks to keep the airplane in lateral trim.’
    • ‘During climb, you have to hold right rudder as there is no rudder trim.’
    • ‘This is how we end up with the airplane way out of trim without knowing it.’
    • ‘For search and rescue missions the rescue hoist and winch are installed on the starboard side and the helicopter operates under hover trim control.’
    • ‘We decided on Meridian, based on the difficulty the pilot was having in controlling the plane without trim.’
    • ‘I gave a good wipeout of the controls and double-checked my flaps-half, trim and radar altimeter set.’
    • ‘With six passengers on board, the pilot took off and immediately had a problem with the aircraft's trim.’
    • ‘In setting the automatic pilot controls, do not let the airplane get too far out of trim.’
    • ‘My IP would be hand flying the descent from altitude without benefit of trim.’
  • 5The way in which a ship floats in the water, especially in relation to the fore-and-aft line:

    ‘ships' masters had to check trim and stability before departure’
    • ‘In consequence, a nuclear submarine proceeding at quite high speeds for protracted periods could become substantially out of trim.’
    • ‘A quick trip from the cabin to check the tiller and sail trim and to scan for other shipping, and the skipper was in from the cold again.’
    • ‘No witness before the Subcommittee was able to offer any reasonable suggestion to explain how the ship could have gotten out of trim in that 24-hour period.’

adjective

  • 1Neat and smart in appearance; in good order:

    ‘she kept her husband's clothes neat and trim’
    ‘a trim little villa’
    • ‘Davies presides over the trim schoolhouse on Sanday, with the island's three children - a fourth is at secondary school in Mallaig - in her care.’
    • ‘These neat and trim premises and surrounds are a credit to the school's scholars and teachers.’
    • ‘Lots of worthwhile things got done today, domestic things, keeping the small ship of our household trim and balanced, clean and supplied with the necessaries.’
    • ‘Perky, painless and politically correct, this frothy little farce benefits from a remarkably trim running time.’
    • ‘The targeting system is fairly intuitive and the controls are fairly trim.’
    • ‘His tavern maid periodically cleaned Iamir's house, and kept the little garden trim.’
    • ‘To be fair, Alasdair McCrone's trim production is performed by a highly convincing, half-Irish cast whose energy serves the play well.’
    • ‘We're in Walton-on-Thames in Surrey where Benedetti lodges with her accompanist and the latter's three young children in a trim cul-de-sac.’
    • ‘I look around me at the trim gardens, the sound of residents rattling about in the kitchens, the bell informing them of the next unit of the day's timetable.’
    • ‘Here's a slim, trim 16 gauge that can also be purchased with an extra set of fitted 20-gauge tubes.’
    • ‘The private school Elliot attends is similar to his home with the dark wood, but the walls are blue and children rather than loose papers roam the area in trim uniforms.’
    • ‘We watched from a bedroom window as a taxi drew up and a good-looking woman in a trim navy suit approached the front door.’
    • ‘Behind the trim lawns and the net curtains, behind the jigsaw of decency, a number of houses have extremist posters in the windows.’
    • ‘The numerous choices include various preferences, faders on/off, smart and trim tool selections and more.’
    • ‘She lived alone in a tiny, trim house on a quiet street.’
    • ‘The trim roadside lawns with shrubberies and annuals both here and on the approach to Cork give a most optimistic expectation of what the town has to offer.’
    • ‘These very trim and neat little craft will be a big addition to the club for their one class racing events.’
    • ‘Despite a trim silhouette, this mini CD / amplifier combo is so good that even high-end hi-fi systems risk being KOd by its talents.’
    neat, tidy, neat and tidy, as neat as a new pin, orderly, in order, in good order, well kept, well looked-after, well maintained, in apple-pie order, immaculate, spick and span, uncluttered, straight, spruce
    smart, stylish, chic, spruce, dapper, elegant, crisp
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Slim and fit:
      ‘she has a trim, athletic figure’
      • ‘And, as you glance down at your figure - unrecognisable from the good old days - you imagine she is still the same size and shape, slim, trim and trendy.’
      • ‘He's slim and trim, doesn't smoke, hardly drinks, eats lots of fish, soya and salad, and does a half-hour workout on his exercise bike each day.’
      • ‘The slim, trim title, suggesting an anthology of prefaces as an art form, is a leftover from Gray's earliest plan for the book.’
      • ‘That said there's little otherwise that is excessive in this trim and spare piece of emotionally and visually restrained film-making.’
      • ‘Also, since the film has a trim 78-minute length, there must be plenty of deleted scenes that did not make it into the final cut.’
      • ‘He turned 70 last October but is trim and healthy enough to appear at least a decade younger.’
      • ‘But if you're slim and trim, then you can have a blast.’
      • ‘She kept trim and fit, but she would always remain petite.’
      • ‘Liz, who now weighs a trim seven-and-a-half stone, also revealed that she wants to have another child with new lover Arun Nayer.’
      • ‘But lamb is fighting back with new cuts - lean, trim, bred and butchered for the modern tastes.’
      • ‘Combined with the tapered schnabel forearm, the rifle seems far more sleek and trim than others I've handled.’
      • ‘Simple trim lace and a dull leather waistcoat swathed his slender form, dampened in the moist morning air.’
      • ‘All qualities, one may contend, perfect to maintain a slim and trim posture.’
      • ‘It is likely enough that pupils painted the background into which the master inserted the Teniers-like bright individual figures and their trim dogs.’
      • ‘Here are a few boating exercises that you can use to stay trim.’
      • ‘The catchiest car commercial of recent times is the one where a trim little vehicle suddenly breaks apart like a Transformer toy and starts dancing.’
      • ‘Specifics aside, this is one slim, trim, light package and every time you pick it up you marvel yet again.’
      slim, slender, lean, clean-limbed, sleek, willowy, lissom, sylphlike, svelte, snake-hipped
      View synonyms

Phrases

  • in trim

    • 1Slim and fit:

      ‘she keeps herself in trim with visits to the health club’
      • ‘I am feeling very fit and have kept in trim by bowling and training with the Australian Academy over the past few weeks.’
      • ‘Shepherd, older brother of former European super-featherweight title contender Charles, keeps in trim by running every day on the sands close to his Silloth home.’
      • ‘It helps to flatten tummies and bumps and get you in trim.’
      • ‘It's good mentally because you have to be alert the whole time and it's great physically because it really keeps your figure in trim.’
      • ‘If you want to get in trim for the summer then this may be the answer.’
      • ‘There was a graduated scale of different exercises, designed to keep the muscles in trim, as well as giving the heart a little exercise as well.’
      • ‘Once we reached our teens many girls wore corsets or corselets under their uniforms to keep their figure in trim.’
      • ‘It will give participants an ideal opportunity to get back in trim after the Yuletide festivities.’
      • ‘Mark cycles in his spare time, but has been using gym and static indoor cycling - or spinning - machines to keep him in trim during wet weather.’
      • ‘Such a desire to get/keep in trim results in you doing active things: gardening; going for walks; joining a gym; buying a bike.’
      fit, fighting fit, as fit as a fiddle, in good health, in good condition, in fine fettle, aerobicized
      slim, in shape
      View synonyms
      1. 1.1In good order.
        • ‘It is a question he must ask every day as he looks in the shaving mirror to keep his designer stubble in trim.’
        • ‘Get your imagination in trim and conquer the art of pre-visualisation to reach the result you want to achieve.’
        • ‘In any case of tuberculosis, provide proper fuel, keep the furnace in trim, remove the clinkers.’
        • ‘And behind the pristine greens are the people who keep it all in trim - the unsung heroes of the fairways’
        • ‘The Ballymoon concern were impressive when beating Van-Elle of Westmeath a month ago and the Burnside brigade have kept in trim since by availing of Duffy Rovers indoor facilities.’
        • ‘It was particularly distressful for the Carlow No.6 in that he was only getting back in trim following a bout of septicaemia.’
        • ‘A personality curve can be layered over that; later, additional filters can be imposed during a show to keep the system in trim.’
  • trim one's sails (to the wind)

    • Make changes to suit one's new circumstances.

      • ‘Yes, sometimes, especially when your job is on the line, you need to trim your sails to the prevailing winds - that's life.’
      • ‘Briefly, since the hour is late, let us take a quick look at what strikes the Professor as an example of an academic trimming her sails to the wind.’
      • ‘So I've sailed under false colors many a time, trimming my sails to the prevailing winds.’
      • ‘In terms of the existing business, the British market - which accounts for 28% of pre-tax profits - is the one most likely to force Goggin to trim his sails.’
      • ‘We're hoping Congress can go on somewhat of a fiscal diet and start trimming their sails and stop spending so much money.’
      • ‘Smith has always shown an ability to sense which way the political wind is blowing and has trimmed his sails accordingly.’
      • ‘Whatever you might think of him and his ideas, it can't be said that McClintock trims his sails to match his audience.’
      • ‘If we are sailors, we will have to trim our sails and put them up.’
      • ‘And Mr. Welch's singular skill has been taking fat, inefficient corporations and trimming their sails.’
      • ‘The courts have rightly trimmed his sails on that issue.’

Origin

Old English trymman, trymian ‘make firm, arrange’, of which the adjective appears to be a derivative. The word's history is obscure; current verb senses date from the early 16th century when usage became frequent and served many purposes: this is possibly explained by spoken or dialect use in the Middle English period not recorded in extant literature.

Pronunciation:

trim

/trɪm/

Definition of Trim in English:

Trim

proper noun

  • A town in Meath, in the Republic of Ireland, situated to the north-west of Dublin; population 7,700 (est. 2009).

Pronunciation:

Trim

/trɪm/