Definition of trice in English:

trice

noun

  • In a moment; very quickly.

    ‘in a trice, she had flown up the stairs’
    • ‘As before, the facilitator grasped my objection in a trice, and even though I sense that she's inclined to side with the material, she gets it.’
    • ‘Why I know at least half-a-dozen who'd file complaints in a trice.’
    • ‘It was a fast, efficient kill and any suffering would have been over in a trice.’
    • ‘It runs extremely quickly and can appear to vanish in a trice.’
    • ‘England know the French can turn a game in a trice even when facing a seemingly desperate deficit.’
    • ‘Of course, the first silly fly to come anywhere close was now snapped up in a trice.’
    • ‘The moment the ever-ready police personnel on duty got the order, they were on the door of my quarter in a trice.’
    • ‘The raspberries have had a good flavour but turn to jam in a trice.’
    • ‘If only she'd said ‘All right - I'll go to Mass ‘, she'd have been out in a trice.’’
    • ‘The driver got out in a trice, and others jumped over to help the girl up.’
    in a moment, in a minute, in a second, shortly, any minute, any minute now, in a short time, in an instant, in the twinkling of an eye, in a flash, in no time, in less than no time, in no time at all, before you know it, before long
    very quickly, swiftly, without delay, at once, straight away, right away, directly
    momentarily
    in a jiffy, in a nanosecond, in two shakes, in two shakes of a lamb's tail, before you can say jack robinson, in the blink of an eye, in a blink, in the wink of an eye, in a wink, before you can say knife
    in a tick, in two ticks, in a mo
    in a snap
    View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English trice ‘a tug’, figuratively ‘an instant’, from Middle Dutch trīsen pull sharply, related to trīse pulley.

Pronunciation:

trice

/trʌɪs/