Definition of treasure in English:

treasure

noun

  • 1[mass noun] A quantity of precious metals, gems, or other valuable objects:

    ‘the ransom was to be paid in diamonds and treasure’
    • ‘In the second half of the nineteenth century others came seeking treasure during the gold rushes.’
    • ‘He had always sort of imagined love, a fact he guarded more carefully than the most precious of his treasure.’
    • ‘He drew it back, cradling it like precious treasure.’
    • ‘He orders a kilo and while the stuff he bought at the first stall would be delivered straight to his restaurant, these he took himself, like precious treasure, in a plastic bag.’
    • ‘It was found to be gold and to contain more than the 10 per cent precious metal content needed for treasure.’
    • ‘A slave had come to the entrance of the dragon's lair, saw a hoard of treasure and gold, and fled with a jewel-studded golden cup.’
    • ‘Those who travelled to Ireland may well have sought the protection of their castle at Dundrum and, perhaps, buried their most valuable treasure there.’
    • ‘The proof comes in the gold and silver treasure found in ancient Egyptian tombs and even older Mesopotamian burial sites.’
    • ‘He arrived back in England with very valuable treasure and the distinction of being the first Englishman to circumnavigate the globe.’
    • ‘So now it's just us who have to take a long hard look at whether our use of time and money is laying up treasure in this world or in heaven.’
    • ‘After paying homage for the noble act, Dantes recovered the buried treasure and became extremely wealthy.’
    • ‘Finders are legally allowed to keep their finds unless they are classed as treasure - usually a gold or silver object dating back over 300 years.’
    • ‘Russia, having annexed the Crimea, had embarked on a titanic struggle with the Ottoman Empire which was absorbing stupendous quantities of manpower and treasure.’
    • ‘The Vatican's treasure of solid gold has been estimated by the United Nations World Magazine to amount to several billion dollars.’
    • ‘After all, these treasures are literally priceless, and the dome has a bit of a bad track record when it comes to guarding treasure - remember the diamond heist?’
    • ‘What more could he possibly want than treasure and riches?’
    • ‘They were seeking gold, silver, and other treasure, but returned disappointed.’
    • ‘They laugh about finding a pirate's treasure and sharing the wealth.’
    • ‘But if the Eastern provinces were poor in manpower, they were immensely wealthy in treasure…’
    • ‘Gawain refused, saying he could not touch treasure or gold until his pilgrimage was complete.’
    riches, valuables, jewels, gems, gold, silver, precious metals, money, cash
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    1. 1.1[count noun] A very valuable object:
      ‘she set out to look at the art treasures’
      • ‘That also got me to read her blog, which is a real treasure.’
      • ‘He has some real treasures there so those of you interested in the topic might like to visit here.’
      • ‘Actually, if God provides you with even one in this life, it's a real treasure in my opinion.’
      • ‘Get your antique treasures valued as part of Hextable Heritage Centre's annual heritage day on September 11.’
      • ‘Ancient manuscripts depicting the history of Armenia are housed in the national library, Madenataran, and are valued national and historical treasures.’
      • ‘If you don't drink the occasional bottle of Californian wine, then you're missing out on some real treasures.’
      • ‘Occasionally, one comes across a real treasure.’
      • ‘The benefit is that you can find real treasures at a fraction of their original cost.’
      • ‘It can take some time, but weeding thru the ‘junk’ can reveal some real treasures.’
      • ‘In fact Loire Valley reds can be real treasures.’
      • ‘Most of the tourists leave after seeing David, but real treasures are on the second floor.’
      • ‘Sometimes, this involved the omission of some real treasures.’
      • ‘For the many reasons that individuals value their own personal treasures, I would like to share why I value this special necklace.’
      • ‘It is a very, very powerful building to visit, and it is a building that my family and I love to visit - and particularly my young son loves the treasures in the museum.’
      • ‘The real treasures were in a couple of burlap bags.’
      • ‘He reckons the island is keeping its real treasures too well hidden’
      • ‘The real treasures which lie beneath our oceans are the time-capsules of the past.’
      • ‘The real treasures here are on the floors above.’
      • ‘The real treasures of the parapet are the huge single beasts, a set of six designs, three living and three extinct, which are highly dramatic in their pencil work.’
      • ‘It's a real treasure of ensemble acting, as every performance not only fulfills the purpose needed for each scene, but they all seem to be working off of each other.’
      valuable object, valuable, work of art, objet of virtu, masterpiece
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    2. 1.2informal [count noun] A much loved or highly valued person:
      ‘the housekeeper is a real treasure—I don't know what he would do without her’
      • ‘Congratulations Maureen; you're one of Kilmead's real treasures.’
      • ‘He's a national treasure and I just love the guy.’
      • ‘Oliver's been a real treasure and has loosely formed a routine for both day and night.’
      • ‘You're a treasure, my old friend, but I have to go now - an editorial needs writing.’
      • ‘Jeannie, you are a treasure to us and we love you so much!’
      darling, angel, apple of one's eye, pride and joy
      paragon, gem, angel, nonpareil
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verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1 Keep carefully (a valuable or valued item):

    ‘my mother gave me the ring and I'll treasure it always’
    • ‘John is now treasuring the watch that his father gave him this week.’
    • ‘Thoughtfully done and vibrantly coloured, they bring out the value of trees and the need to treasure them for posterity.’
    • ‘He remembered always treasuring it, and never wearing it, afraid it would be damaged.’
    • ‘As a boy who was born and brought up at the foot of Kentmere in the heart of the Lake District I remember treasuring each new volume as they were published.’
    • ‘The lens treasures private moments as if cupping them in the curve of the viewer's hands.’
    • ‘My dad is also an avid gardener, who treasures the tree.’
    • ‘Although exhilarating to open it's not a Christmas present that you'll treasure forever.’
    • ‘Almost every house in the centre of town lovingly treasures its own piece of the mosaic.’
    • ‘Mr Henderson treasures the photograph of the Scarcroft schoolchildren who pulled off the feat in 1950.’
    • ‘Louise, of Greenroyd Avenue, writes regularly to Reggie in prison and says she treasures the letters she receives from him.’
    • ‘It was her first experience at tramping on ice and she treasures the photograph which he took.’
    • ‘I will be getting the shirt framed and will treasure it always.’
    • ‘People treasure their albums but they don't necessarily treasure their singles.’
    • ‘Passes will have to go to hand, ball will not have to be turned over and the side will need to treasure the ball more carefully than they are at present.’
    • ‘I will always treasure my favourite motorcycling footage on bike with Steve for his record breaking lap at the TT.’
    • ‘Mrs Nicholls said: ‘Judith told us when she came back the first year in August they were still treasuring the boxes and wrapping paper.’’
    • ‘One thing is for sure, I'll always treasure my only pair of Shaq 2's which is stuffed under my bed because I doubt we'll ever see a retro of these.’
    • ‘It had been a birthday gift from someone he didn't remember when he was small and he had always treasured it.’
    • ‘He treasures it to this day, but not for the glorious version of events that it chronicles.’
    • ‘He treasures Parveen's poetical works inscribed by the poetess herself to Aitzaz Ahsan.’
    cherish, hold dear, place great value on, prize, set great store by, value greatly, esteem
    adore, dote on, love dearly, be devoted to, idolize, worship, think very highly of, appreciate greatly
    preserve, keep safe
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    1. 1.1 Value highly:
      ‘the island is treasured by walkers and conservationists’
      ‘his library was his most treasured possession’
      • ‘He goes about his work like someone polishing a treasured artefact and pausing to admire his reflection in his work.’
      • ‘The years of youth are given to us only once by the Creator, to be treasured while possessed.’
      • ‘Among these was the latter's agreement to respect a number of human rights treasured in the west.’
      • ‘He was posthumously awarded a Certificate of Bravery which is still a treasured possession in the family.’
      • ‘Mr Holland searched high and low for some convenient storage solution for his son's treasured possessions.’
      • ‘It worked, and she grinned as Sebastian bent to pick up her treasured possession.’
      • ‘His employer treasured him, admired his skill greatly and paid him well.’
      • ‘Take a moment to treasure all the stuff you do have and appreciate what's really important - your health, family, friends, a boyfriend!’
      • ‘This includes the loss of treasured possessions, not to mention the upheaval of moving out for five to seven months.’
      • ‘Chances are the burglar and your treasured possessions will be long gone before the police arrive.’
      • ‘And yet there is always the need for complete integration, for mindfulness and respect, for the treasuring of what one has understood, what one has received.’
      • ‘Indeed, I had learned to treasure and appreciate time I was given with my friends more than I ever had.’
      • ‘Perhaps it is their wisdom and spirit that I respect and treasure.’
      • ‘There is much to admire and treasure in Scotland, but in an increasingly competitive market, it is those who go the extra mile to perfect the things that are wrong who will succeed.’
      • ‘They were unhurt, but most of their treasured possessions have been destroyed.’
      • ‘It is elaborated as a quality possessed by the sages but also treasured as folk wisdom and wit.’
      • ‘Now her treasured possessions are to go under the hammer at Dale Wood Auctioneers in Batley, next Tuesday.’
      • ‘At auction, cherished memories are trashed as treasured possessions are sifted and ascribed their price in the name of the bottom line.’
      • ‘Your personal relationship is to be respected and treasured as it has withstood the test of tide and time.’
      • ‘I treasure you my love and have so much respect and admiration for you.’

Origin

Middle English: from Old French tresor, based on Greek thēsauros (see thesaurus).

Pronunciation

treasure

/ˈtrɛʒə/