Definition of treachery in English:

treachery

noun

  • 1[mass noun] Betrayal of trust:

    ‘many died because of his treachery’
    [count noun] ‘his distaste for plots and treacheries’
    • ‘It is a story of intrigue, deception and treachery.’
    • ‘It would, therefore, have been an act of treachery not to speak on behalf on the people that he represented.’
    • ‘In Islamic folklore, however, they symbolize deceit, treachery, and adultery.’
    • ‘The centuries that followed were full of intrigue and treachery.’
    • ‘Many of the local double as actors, and twice a week they play out their heritage, s story of love and treachery.’
    • ‘In the end, an amazing tale of deceit and treachery is played out between these two men.’
    • ‘Pirates like Blackbeard have been feared and fabled for centuries in stories of treachery at sea and buried treasure.’
    • ‘Any threat to this peace must be treated as an act of treachery - a traitor's action.’
    • ‘But we should not allow him, or his friends, to forget his own personal treachery.’
    • ‘The film revolves around crimes of passion based on unrequited love, lust, treachery and revenge.’
    • ‘I am stunned at their casual treachery to this country, to humanity.’
    • ‘This would be seen as treachery despite the fact that it could be a key step in the revitalisation of the economy on both sides.’
    • ‘From the perspective of Russian strategists, this proposal smacks of incredible stupidity or even treachery.’
    • ‘Already on this very day this step of his is put down as one of the greatest acts of treachery in Hungary's history.’
    • ‘He accomplished this task by treachery, secrecy, speed and dishonesty.’
    • ‘These are deliberate acts of treachery and are roundly condemned.’
    • ‘Here was one of my intellectual heroes committing an act of ideological treachery.’
    • ‘Lady Macbeth feels that if her husband does not enjoy his royalty, then all of their deceit and treachery has been for nothing.’
    • ‘We will not forget that treachery, and we will accept nothing less than victory over the enemy.’
    • ‘This was considered an act of treachery at a time when Britain was experiencing difficulties in North Afrika against Rommel's Afrika Korps.’
    betrayal, disloyalty, perfidy, perfidiousness, faithlessness, unfaithfulness, infidelity, bad faith, breach of trust, duplicity, deceit, deceitfulness, deception, false-heartedness, falseness, stab in the back, back-stabbing, double-dealing, untrustworthiness
    treason
    two-timing
    punic faith
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 The quality of being deceptive:
      ‘the treachery of language’
      • ‘The show reeks with tension, treachery, and posturing to gain favor.’
      • ‘It highlights all that is bad in human nature: cunning, craftiness, and treachery.’
      • ‘However, they were to face the most chaotic world of deception and treachery that awaits for them.’
      • ‘They claim they can help companies place higher in your rankings, but sometimes they resort to treachery.’

Origin

Middle English: from Old French trecherie, from trechier to cheat.

Pronunciation:

treachery

/ˈtrɛtʃ(ə)ri/