Definition of tragedy in English:

tragedy

nounPlural tragedies

  • 1An event causing great suffering, destruction, and distress, such as a serious accident, crime, or natural catastrophe.

    ‘a tragedy that killed 95 people’
    mass noun ‘his life had been plagued by tragedy’
    • ‘She is determined to help improve health care in developing nations, to prevent tragedies like her natural mother's early death.’
    • ‘The patients to undergo this new medical procedure have been seriously disfigured by burns, serious accidents or personal tragedies.’
    • ‘Pastors' presence as community leaders is most evident after collective tragedies such as fatal accidents and violent crimes.’
    • ‘Some accidental deaths are not tragedies, it turns out.’
    • ‘The tragedies caused by accident, human error and carelessness have become the most significant in the early history of the region.’
    • ‘But unfortunately there is the bad news as well, the tragedies, accidents and the deaths.’
    • ‘You understand, sort of, when people die of natural tragedies, whether it's fires or tornadoes or hurricanes or whatever.’
    • ‘And the deaths flowing from natural tragedies such as this seem very arbitrary, unfair and unacceptable.’
    • ‘Random accidents and everyday tragedies become just another ratings-boosting gimmick, filling airtime before the next disaster strikes.’
    • ‘In reality, we all know of baddies in this world for who everything seems to go perfectly for, while on the other hand we know of very good people who suffer several setbacks and tragedies in life.’
    • ‘The official outcome of the investigation was that the tragedy was an accident - pure and simple.’
    • ‘These frightening statistics speak for themselves and behind these figures there lie terrible human tragedies and unimaginable suffering.’
    • ‘Any road accident that causes a death or serious injury is a tragedy.’
    • ‘The government and the media have attempted to portray the tragedy as a natural disaster.’
    • ‘The show is a catalogue of accidents, deaths and tragedies.’
    • ‘Terrible human tragedies and unimaginable suffering result from fatal accidents in farming each year.’
    • ‘Each death is a tragedy with devastating life changing effects on the families of the children killed.’
    • ‘But road safety campaigners say the figures hide the human tragedy behind each accident.’
    • ‘The floods which swept through Mozambique were a natural tragedy which could not have been prevented.’
    • ‘The narrator's diaries record her friend's distress, and the tragedies that result.’
    disaster, calamity, catastrophe, cataclysm, devastation, misfortune, misadventure, mishap, reverse, vicissitude, setback, trial, tribulation, affliction, blight, injury, adversity, sad event, serious accident
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  • 2A play dealing with tragic events and having an unhappy ending, especially one concerning the downfall of the main character.

    ‘Shakespeare's tragedies’
    • ‘Shakespeare wrote tragedies, romance, history, comedy and problem plays all with great success.’
    • ‘Seneca produced his own versions of tragedies by Sophocles, Euripides, and Aeschylus.’
    • ‘Let's be honest here, Shakespeare's tragedies are filled with dialogue, monologue, and soliloquy.’
    • ‘The Play of King Lear is a great tragic play that many tragedies try to compare to.’
    • ‘The characters in the tragedies of Sophocles resist all warnings and inescapably meet with disaster.’
    • ‘He saw comedies, tragedies, dramas, shows of acrobatics and clowning, all accompanied by fine music, and all this performed by a family of only twenty members.’
    • ‘is a question that the drama puts with a boldness and clarity few other Shakespeare tragedies bring to their ethical or moral concerns.’
    • ‘Three of these plays were usually tragedies, plays that focused on a heroic character who falls due to his own folly.’
    • ‘This turns the play into a gripping tragedy and a moving tale of human frailty.’
    • ‘Three utterly madcap men in tights and sneakers take the theatre by storm as they gallop through the tragedies, histories and comedies at a speed that will leave you gasping.’
    • ‘By a series of unfortunate circumstances, the tragedy of Othello the Moor, was turned into The Moor The Merrier.’
    • ‘Between 1776 and 1794, Cowley produced ten comedies, two tragedies, a farce, and many poems.’
    • ‘Comedies, tragedies, musicals and dramas make this a remarkably diverse theater season.’
    • ‘This last and driest of Shakespeare's tragedies is, in some ways, his most unusual.’
    • ‘Then again, it's a theme of war films to make tragedies all the more tragic, isn't it?’
    • ‘Did all the gory deaths he witnessed while serving in the Canadian ambulance corps in the Second World War help him play tragedies?’
    • ‘One example is the accompanying contemporary, or pop music, with Greek tragedies or Shakespearean plays.’
    • ‘In Racine's tragedies, confusion often reigns, and from it a tragic reversal takes place.’
    tragic drama, drama, play
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    1. 2.1mass noun The dramatic genre represented by tragedies.
      ‘Greek tragedy’
      Compare with comedy
      • ‘There are two uses of the Shakespearean concept of tragedy that could be drawn on.’
      • ‘In other words, shifting the format from theatrical tragedy to televisual sitcom.’
      • ‘Emblem books and tragedy can be considered as the two literary genres in which this twofold image of death is best exemplified.’
      • ‘That said, it is still an enjoyable evening - both comedy and tragedy certainly have their moments.’
      • ‘I love politics, too, with its human dramas worthy of Greek tragedy, or at least soap opera.’
      • ‘In the various sessions, it ran up and down the scales from high drama to epic tragedy, from broad comedy to poignant romance.’
      • ‘No one, I confidently told an academic friend this week, writes tragedy any more.’
      • ‘This may not be French classical tragedy as we normally understand it.’
      • ‘The bedroom scenes were disturbing and memorable, more tragedy then comedy.’
      • ‘To transcend the bounds of tragedy is credit to both writer and performer.’
      • ‘But, even if the result is stylised tragedy, the three principals perform with great skill.’
      • ‘The representatives of tragedy and comedy chosen are not Greek but Roman.’
      • ‘That purging of emotions that drama, especially tragedy, is supposed to inspire.’
      • ‘However, what is there in linguistic gravity, romance and tragedy is slightly lacking in subtlety.’
      • ‘The Cheltenham Festival witnessed an opening day of drama laced with tragedy.’
      • ‘You could accuse him of hitching a lift on the back of Greek tragedy.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from Old French tragedie, via Latin from Greek tragōidia, apparently from tragos ‘goat’ (the reason remains unexplained) + ōidē ‘song, ode’. Compare with tragic.

Pronunciation

tragedy

/ˈtradʒɪdi/