Definition of tradition in English:

tradition

noun

  • 1[mass noun] The transmission of customs or beliefs from generation to generation, or the fact of being passed on in this way:

    ‘members of different castes have by tradition been associated with specific occupations’
    • ‘Riches are now measured in human attitudes and aptitudes - things heavily influenced by tradition.’
    • ‘By definition, a legend is an unverified story handed down by tradition.’
    • ‘In many ways, the two incumbents are past their sell-by dates, preserved as majors not by reality, but by tradition and maudlin sentimentality.’
    • ‘The bride, who was by tradition slightly late for the ceremony, faltered as she spoke in front of family, friends and celebrities.’
    • ‘They are required to by tradition and tribal law passed down by generations of swing elders.’
    • ‘In any case people can no longer afford to celebrate the many festivals handed down to them by tradition and for many it is just a day to rest tired and aching limbs.’
    • ‘The break with tradition has generated a heated debate on Internet fans' forums over the weekend, with supporters divided on the proposed name change.’
    • ‘Significantly, her decision not to vote with the consensus view marked a break with tradition among those attending their first meeting and may signal an appetite for a fight.’
    • ‘By tradition the Conservative leader emerged after consultation among senior party figures.’
    • ‘Do they have the guts to break with tradition, to govern for all, especially for the economically dispossessed and socially displaced?’
    • ‘At the level of scholarship their writings certainly show that Chinese thought was then by no means as bound by tradition as is generally thought.’
    • ‘As parents, the Imperial couple generally abided by tradition, albeit with a few big changes triggered by the war.’
    • ‘Either by tradition or practice, these widows have been denied their fundamental rights of equitable justice.’
    • ‘A Caliph is the civil and religious leader of a Muslim state; a successor of Muhammad and by tradition always male.’
    • ‘Let's not be hidebound by tradition and calendars.’
    • ‘The denizens, be they peers or peasants, are weighed down by tradition and inertia, living out their lives according to exactly the same patterns as their ancestors.’
    • ‘In a break with tradition, several professors at the academy have established a memorial prize to honor the young man who was anything but traditional.’
    • ‘This marked a notable break with tradition as the convention was always held in Dunmore before this.’
    • ‘The Royal Family and the Army are inextricably bound up by tradition and personal links.’
    • ‘The fact that you have not been seemingly bound by tradition in either format or construction of this journal is certainly refreshing.’
    historical convention, unwritten law, oral history, heritage
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1[count noun] A long-established custom or belief that has been passed on from one generation to another:
      ‘Japan's unique cultural traditions’
      • ‘Women are subject to this discourse both in the name of religion as well as in the name of age-old customs and traditions.’
      • ‘This has also resulted in many folk beliefs and cultural traditions being turned upside down.’
      • ‘The age old customs and traditions of the Tamils are held in high esteem by Keralites and they are preserved in modern Kerala.’
      • ‘Such traditions generate belief, allowing future rituals to produce placebo effects.’
      • ‘Hardy wrote of country habits and traditions which had passed away but, though historical in form, the novels had a contemporary overtone.’
      • ‘Basotho are a nation that has solid traditions, beliefs and customs.’
      • ‘Many immigrants preserve their cultural traditions for multiple generations, with art playing a key role.’
      • ‘Passing on Hindu traditions to the younger generation has always been a duty of parents.’
      • ‘Their labels and names represent both villages and families, with generations of winemaking traditions.’
      • ‘This hindered the ability to pass on whaling traditions to future generations.’
      • ‘Apparently we must now dilute our own customs and traditions and deny our religion.’
      • ‘She was devoted to her family and had a great fondness for the traditions and customs which were part of her upbringing.’
      • ‘Did you see a lot of those cultural beliefs or traditions going on while you were there, or was it more medical?’
      • ‘He also had a great attachment to the folklore and cultural traditions of the general Irishtown area.’
      • ‘Such a state of confusing dilemma caused heavy blow to the age-old traditions and beliefs of these cultures.’
      • ‘You may feel oppressed by traditions and traditional people in the family if you allow them to interfere in your life.’
      • ‘The excellence of the collection can be demonstrated by the way she deals with supernatural belief traditions.’
      • ‘Now even its own people are abandoning their traditions and beliefs.’
      • ‘Customs and traditions are handed down from generation to generation but that does not make them right.’
      • ‘Lanna folkdances are unique and colorful traditions that are passed on through generations.’
      custom, practice, convention, ritual, ceremony, observance, wont, routine, way, rule, usage, habit
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    2. 1.2[in singular] An artistic or literary method or style established by an artist, writer, or movement, and subsequently followed by others:
      ‘visionary works in the tradition of William Blake’
      • ‘This poem is rooted in the tradition of many Scottish artists of looking confidently and ambitiously to the future of Scotland.’
      • ‘The ‘shadow poet laureate’ places himself in the tradition of great anti-establishment poets like Byron, Shelley and Blake.’
      • ‘The artist claims that, in the tradition of modernism, her work is no more than visible surface.’
      • ‘Witty, flamboyant and scandalous, he was also a diarist in the tradition of Samuel Pepys.’
      • ‘This profound analysis was entirely in the tradition of the method of Marxist analysis whose supreme exponent was Leon Trotsky.’
      • ‘Many are truly beautiful and dazzling, in the tradition of a Ray Bradbury novel, but merely the beginning.’
      • ‘In philosophical terms, deconstruction is a form of relativist scepticism in the tradition of Nietzsche.’
      • ‘Roman comic dramatist who wrote in the tradition of the New Comedy, popular in 4th-century Greece and exemplified by the work of Menander.’
      • ‘By nature he is a social realist in the tradition of Upton Sinclair, whose novels he reveres along with those of social satirist Evelyn Waugh.’
      • ‘In the tradition of Goya - and with genuine skill - he has painted the camp cadavers.’
      • ‘His first pictorial works were in the tradition of the renaissance.’
      • ‘Additionally, her characters have exotic and sometimes grotesque attributes that bring to mind the Surrealist tradition.’
      • ‘And I think there's a tradition of writers from Defoe to Burgess who see the business of writing as communicating, and turn their hands to different forms.’
      • ‘Cornelius's works, essentially linear in the tradition of Dürer, avoid painterly composition or colour.’
      • ‘Inspired by his mother's deep love for it's poetry, he wrote lyric poems in the tradition of Hölderlin and Rilke.’
      • ‘To art historians trained in the Warburgian tradition this method would seem as old as art history itself, but it was a novelty for the history of Dutch painting.’
      • ‘But this Southerner first came into his own as a northern Expressionist in the tradition of Edvard Munch.’
      • ‘She continues writing articles, and curating exhibitions in the tradition of experimental art.’
      • ‘In the tradition of folk artists everywhere, Nana taught her to sew and knit, instilling in her the sense of the art in the handcrafted.’
      • ‘This follows in the tradition of the Pre-Raphaelites, the Romantics and, most intriguingly, the British neo-Romantics of the 1940s.’
      style, movement, method
      View synonyms
  • 2Theology
    A doctrine believed to have divine authority though not in the scriptures, in particular:

    1. 2.1[mass noun] (in Christianity) doctrine not explicit in the Bible but held to derive from the oral teaching of Christ and the Apostles.
      • ‘One conspicuous tradition within Christianity says boldly that people are saved only by and in faith in Jesus Christ.’
      • ‘First, though, let us review the ironic neglect of Spirit in our Western Christian tradition.’
      • ‘They dictate that to be a Roman Catholic is to be loyal to the Pope and the institution alone, regardless of the teachings of Jesus Christ and the tradition of the Church.’
      • ‘Within the Christian tradition, the Eucharist has become the great way of thanksgiving.’
      • ‘Their approach fails to engage the width and breadth of the Christian moral tradition.’
    2. 2.2 (in Judaism) an ordinance of the oral law not in the Torah but held to have been given by God to Moses.
      • ‘Every member of the Sanhedrin must be ordained, following a tradition from Moses.’
      • ‘To what extent do reasonably well established Jewish traditions command us?’
      • ‘Jewish tradition teaches that each and every Jew is responsible for one another.’
      • ‘Jewish tradition says that Kaddish is so powerful that the whole world is maintained because of it.’
      • ‘Jewish tradition emphasizes that the Torah was given not to angels but to human beings.’
      • ‘Its logic isn't drawn so much from the traditions of Judaism and its reliance on Torah, however.’
    3. 2.3 (in Islam) a saying or act ascribed to the Prophet but not recorded in the Koran.
      See Hadith
      • ‘One tradition indicates that Muhammad was performing the noon prayer at the mosque of Banu Salama in Medina when he changed direction in the middle of the prayer.’
      • ‘I speak of Muslim women in history and women as explained in the Qur'an and in the tradition of the Prophet.’
      • ‘There is a tradition of the Prophet which shows that he considered knowledge as his weapon.’
      • ‘In the report, he also alleged interrogators ridiculed the Muslim religion, its traditions and the Koran.’
      • ‘Thus the incidental killing of women and children has the sanction in the traditions of the Prophet.’
      • ‘His father was a Sufi Muslim, devoted to a tolerant, mystical tradition of Islam.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from Old French tradicion, or from Latin traditio(n-), from tradere deliver, betray, from trans- across + dare give.

Pronunciation:

tradition

/trəˈdɪʃ(ə)n/