Definition of tracery in English:

tracery

noun

Architecture
  • 1[mass noun] Ornamental stone openwork, typically in the upper part of a Gothic window.

    ‘the rose designs were divided by tracery’
    • ‘This was costly to construct, flamboyant, and characterized by ogee arches, flowing and inventive window tracery, and lighter vaulting.’
    • ‘Earlier masons, he tells us, produced simple tracery in round windows by piercing stone discs.’
    • ‘The main medieval style in western Europe, characterized by the pointed arch, slender columns and shafts, buttresses, pinnacles, and increasingly complex ceiling vaulting and window tracery.’
    • ‘Windows were traditionally of translucent alabaster, but during the second Turkish occupation, deeply coloured stained glass began to be used in the decorative plaster window tracery.’
    • ‘The result incorporates a visible seismic infrastructure with shapes that reflect the traditional Gothic tracery.’
    • ‘In addition, the top areas of the main windows are decorated with stone tracery describing trefoils, quatrefoils and Moorish arches.’
    web, criss-cross, grid, lattice, net, matrix, mesh, webbing, tracery, trellis
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1[count noun]A delicate branching pattern.
      ‘a tracery of red veins’
      • ‘The delicate traceries of individual drawings mingle and tangle with each other, creating labyrinths of wings, teeth and sinewy limbs.’
      • ‘Beneath them they saw delicate traceries of red and realized that only inches below their feet the molten lava of Hawaii ran in its broken arteries.’
      • ‘Compositions on white paper seem gently washed with faint shadows, while those on black paper are inhabited by cloudlike presences made of traceries of white filigree lines.’
      • ‘Their skins, a phosphorescent seafoam green, were embellished with a delicate tracery of painted tattoos - leaves, flowers, sperm, tears, butterflies.’
      • ‘In Splendor on the Bench, a realistically rendered vacuum-tube stereo amplifier sits alone in a paneled room, the painting's surface marked by a delicate tracery.’
      • ‘Like the caper white, many of the whites are plain on top, but when they close their wings you see fine traceries, often with yellow highlights.’
      • ‘Her ruby eyes were underscored by traceries of barely distinguishable wrinkles, and her uncovered hands were worn thin with age.’
      • ‘There were an assortment of fine traceries on his body, most were from shallower cuts and would eventually disappear, some would not.’
      • ‘Over the skin was a delicate tracery of black tattooing, marred by a badly healed wound that ran diagonally across the face.’
      • ‘The artist has said these red traceries indicate bloodlines linking all Chinese to one family, and may also refer to a shared history under Communist rule.’
      • ‘Faint traceries of blue light danced along the mirror-bright cutting edges.’
      • ‘There's something about blocks of text, with odd patterns and traceries running through it, that is visually arresting.’
      • ‘Naturalistic process is paramount; albums come with pithy back-stories haloed in hazy traceries of light, flickering with pastoral forest music, and whispering tape-hiss sprites.’
      • ‘The curtains are made of saris glittering with sequins a tracery of gold threads unfurling.’
      • ‘Perhaps the least successful of the works is one of the large rectangular panels, overlaid with a tracery of thin clothbound branches, in which the underlying marks and carvings seem somewhat arbitrary and forced.’
      • ‘Their trunks, though smaller, had delicate and fine traceries of bark, showing an age far beyond their size.’
      • ‘Ochre and red rippled across the male's mantle, in the delicate, complex traceries of which only males were capable.’
      • ‘As a 1917 photograph of this painting shows, the sail that fills much of the foreground originally bore a delicate tracery of rigging.’
      • ‘The reading of the painting is controlled, held back, balked, as the eye scans the gap between traceries, the small negative spaces that become positive for a moment and shift the emphasis.’
      • ‘Smoke rose from chimneys in the distant village, the traceries of smoke vertical in the crisp morning air.’

Pronunciation:

tracery

/ˈtreɪs(ə)ri/