Main definitions of tosh in English

: tosh1tosh2

tosh1

noun

mass nounBritish
informal
  • Rubbish; nonsense.

    ‘it's sentimental tosh’
    • ‘The film sets out to be a big weepy, but is saved from being complete sentimental tosh by the conflict between the angry Peter and the consoling Barrie.’
    • ‘Unfortunately our authorities and political system are so wrapped up in institutionalised deceit that we just get fobbed of with any old tosh wrapped up as facts.’
    • ‘It's got to be better than stopping people in the street who'll quickly make up any old tosh just to get away and get on with their daily duties.’
    • ‘I just find that over sentimental tosh in a programme which has (though not always) managed to deal with such sentiments without having you reach for a sick bag.’
    • ‘So imagine my surprise to find that a full third of the clergy, according to this report from Reuters suspect that the Resurrection is a load of old tosh!’
    • ‘With the greatest respect the email about the danger of phones is rubbish, absolute tosh, should be ignored etc.’
    • ‘On the other, it encourages an irrational climate in which any old conspiratorial tosh can be taken seriously, providing it touches the correct raw nerve.’
    • ‘People sidle up to you for advice and you tell them any old tosh and they go away happy.’
    • ‘But any hint of an interesting plot development soon gets buried beneath so much old fashioned, tedious tosh.’
    • ‘It's been a few years now since apartheid was dismantled, so why dredge up old tosh?’
    • ‘Actually they aren't waiting, they are now helping them to close with this ban on displaying goods on the pavement - what a load of tosh!’
    • ‘As you might have guess, I think that astrology is a load of utter tosh.’
    • ‘Well they could go further and say that the whole thing is a load of tosh but that they are very thankful for all the money that they get for doing it.’
    • ‘‘It was all a load of tosh,’ she says, grimacing.’
    • ‘Then again, there are those who reckon that's a load of old tosh and who would love nothing more than to be a fly on the wall next time BT's chiefs get together.’
    • ‘In my case this business about ‘two weeks and the full on craving goes away’ is a load of old tosh.’
    • ‘Like most of the journalists working on The Guide he seemed to realise that writing for this publication meant you could get away with any old tosh but over the years has refined this to an art.’
    • ‘The concerns of some that bloggers lack credibility or trust and that given the absence of any rules any old tosh can be published on the internet is so much fretting about nothing.’
    • ‘Undoubtedly, there are those who will probably dismiss Adaptation as a load of self-indulgent tosh, or as a smug and overly-clever attempt to poke fun at just about everything.’
    nonsense, balderdash, gibberish, claptrap, blarney, blather, blether, moonshine
    View synonyms

Origin

Late 19th century: of unknown origin.

Pronunciation

tosh

/tɒʃ/

Main definitions of tosh in English

: tosh1tosh2

tosh2

noun

British
informal
  • Used as a casual form of address, especially to an unknown person.

Origin

1950s: of unknown origin.

Pronunciation

tosh

/tɒʃ/