Definition of tortoise in English:

tortoise

noun

  • 1A slow-moving typically herbivorous land reptile of warm climates, enclosed in a scaly or leathery domed shell into which it can retract its head and thick legs.

    Family Testudinidae: numerous genera and species, including the European tortoise (Testudo graeca). See also giant tortoise

    Called turtle in North America
    • ‘The tortoises, marine iguanas and land iguanas on the Galapagos Islands, studied by Charles Darwin, provide some of the most striking examples.’
    • ‘Wild goats and pigs threaten the food supply of the magnificent Galapagos tortoises, and rats eat the eggs of birds and reptiles that have evolved without natural predators.’
    • ‘As the last two wives were passing, one of them stubbed her toe against the tortoise's shell and instantly let out a cry of pain.’
    • ‘In addition, males are smaller than are females in most Testudinidae, particularly among European tortoises.’
    • ‘But if no rains fall during the warm seasons and the tortoises don't get a chance to drink, they will enter hibernation dehydrated, malnourished, and with a bladder full of toxic waste.’
    • ‘He was sentenced to a total of two months, suspended for a year, and banned from keeping a pet shop, reptiles or tortoises for ten years.’
    • ‘Fortunately, it landed on the tortoise and established a strong bond.’
    • ‘It was dropped by an eagle who was trying to crack open the tortoise's shell in order to eat it.’
    • ‘I held my breath as the dust cleared, and was relieved to see the tortoise lying fully retracted but unharmed.’
    • ‘But when 14-year-old Luke tried to tempt it out of its shell by feeding it lettuce, as common herbivorous tortoises are accustomed to eating, the creature snapped at his hand with such force he was lucky to escape with his fingers intact.’
    • ‘I've been fascinated by tortoises and turtles for a long time and I collect tortoise / turtle knick-knacks and figurines.’
    • ‘The strength of a unique male bond between a young hippopotamus and a 130-year-old tortoise will be tested later this spring when conservation workers introduce a female hippo to the mix.’
    • ‘Lizards, tortoises, salamanders and many other animals all move in this way, but it has disadvantages.’
    • ‘The Iti National Park has wild goats, wild boars, deer, rodents, tortoises, reptiles, as well as an amazing variety of birds among which there are vultures, eagles, partridges, hoopoes, hawks, and owls.’
    • ‘Thankfully the fire crew didn't need to use their cutting equipment and managed to coax the tortoise out of his shell by poking around inside.’
    • ‘Land tortoises are vegetarian, eating leaves, grass, and in some cases even cactus.’
    • ‘Persistence and tenacity, not to say downright stubbornness, are qualities that all tortoise owners will recognize.’
    • ‘The herbivorous reptiles and tortoises had thrived until the arrival of man - and the rats that stowed away on his ships - because there had been no large predatory, carnivorous mammals for them to contend with.’
    • ‘I shot one sequence of a small female tortoise foiling a large male's mating attempts by quickly spinning around under his huge shell - a behavior I'd seen many times but never before captured.’
    • ‘This mechanism is consistent with G. agassizii's propensity to relax homeostasis and appears critical to desert tortoise survival and reproduction.’
    • ‘But the tugging tides of conservatism outlast most swells of enthusiasm and a series of setbacks conspired to drive London's orchestras furtively back into their shells, like Galapagos tortoises in a hurricane.’
    • ‘Baby One Thousand, along with 64 tortoise brothers and sisters, is aboard, too, in a well-ventilated crate on deck.’
    • ‘Once she lays and buries her eggs, the female desert tortoise is finished with her parental role.’
    • ‘A turtle lives in the water, a tortoise lives on land.’
    • ‘A two-headed tortoise has come out of its shell in Dorset to find itself in the media spotlight.’
    • ‘The strange tortoise's shell is flat underneath and not rounded at the belly as usual, he says.’
    • ‘Therefore, though not excluding the presence of intrasexual selection in tortoise mating system, it seems likely that females are the choosy sex.’
    • ‘A mammal such as a horse, that stands with its left and right feet close together, has to control transverse movements of its centre of mass much more precisely than a reptile such as a tortoise, that stands with its feet far apart.’
    • ‘While desert predators, particularly ravens and coyotes, can't do much damage to adults, they can easily penetrate the shells of young tortoises.’
    • ‘Currently, the group is in the midst of training dogs to find desert tortoise scat and hope to conduct testing this spring in Nevada.’
    • ‘But first, do you know the difference between a turtle and tortoise?’
    • ‘Other characters included two long-suffering frogs called Ernie and Sylve, an heroic tortoise called Lewis Collins and a little white shell called Jim Morrison.’
    • ‘Hot on its heels is a seriously perturbed tortoise racing for the horizon in this Costa Rican forest.’
    • ‘For example, a tortoise is a herbivore and hibernates but a snake eats meat and needs to be kept warm all year.’
    • ‘We'd stroke her feet and drum our fingers gently on her shell (the tortoise equivalent of a jockey's crop).’
    • ‘Here the King of the Jungle was a giant vegetarian tortoise, and there were no large predators of any kind.’
    • ‘Our goal was to place G. berlandieri in the greater context of turtle and tortoise life history strategies.’
    • ‘However, patterns of rainfall and tortoise reproduction are different in the Sonoran Desert.’
    • ‘The origin of turtles and tortoises from ancestral reptiles is still unclear.’
    • ‘There the hippo immediately ran to Mzee, a 130-year-old Aldabran tortoise who resides at the Haller Park sanctuary.’
    1. 1.1Australian A freshwater turtle.
      • ‘It carried its little Ôswag’ on its back, and thrust out its head from a sockety head like that of a tortoise.’
      • ‘Moreover, I had never thought of the fox as being a particularly Chinese animal like, say, the tortoise.’
      • ‘Three other tortoises, two snapping turtles and a monitor lizard had to be hosed down by firefighters in Eric and Carole Griffiths' home in Chorlton-cum-Hardy, Manchester.’
      • ‘The Turtle Conservation Fund has listed the 25 most endangered turtles to highlight the survival crisis facing tortoises and freshwater turtles and to unveil a global plan to prevent further extinctions.’
      • ‘‘Racing’ may sound like an odd term to describe a tortoise, but gopher tortoises are faster than you might think.’
      • ‘Blue skinks, bearded dragons, crocodiles, alien-looking veiled chameleons, reticulated pythons, leopard tortoises, and tiny glistening frogs and toads of every color.’
      • ‘Because two days ago at the Crocodile Bank not far from Mahabalipuram, along with hundreds of fascinating crocs and tortoises and snakes, I saw this sign.’
  • 2

    another term for testudo
    • ‘The testudo, the tortoise formation, involved raising the scutums into a shell.’
    • ‘Like the tortoise thing that the roman soldiers used to do…’
    • ‘It was also used by the Romans when they used what was known as a tortoise formation to move forward to a target that was well defended.’
    • ‘The children are also learning to march like a tortoise as the Romans did, with shields at their side and on top.’

Origin

Late Middle English tortu, tortuce: from Old French tortue and Spanish tortuga, both from medieval Latin tortuca, of uncertain origin. The current spelling dates from the mid 16th century.

Pronunciation

tortoise

/ˈtɔːtəs//ˈtɔːtɔɪz/