Definition of Tony in English:

Tony

noun

  • (in the US) any of a number of awards given annually for outstanding achievement in the theatre in various categories.

    • ‘This two-part epic won about every major theatrical award, including two Tonys and a Pulitzer Prize.’
    • ‘She has not won an Academy award, but has won two Tonys.’
    • ‘The musical has won over 50 international theatre awards, including eight Tonys.’
    • ‘It has collected over 30 international theatre awards including three Tonys for the Broadway production.’
    • ‘It was up for five Tonys, winning for its lighting, its scenic design, the leading performance and even for the score by Tim Rice and Elton John.’

Origin

1940s: from the nickname of Antoinette Perry (1888-1946), American actress and director.

Pronunciation:

Tony

/ˈtəʊni/

Definition of tony in English:

tony

adjective

North american
informal
  • Fashionable among wealthy or stylish people.

    ‘a tony restaurant’
    • ‘It's not just their ability to publish in so many tony outlets - it's the fact that they're more than a decade younger than me and publishing in so many tony outlets.’
    • ‘It markets its meat to tony Manhattan restaurants and gets top dollar.’
    • ‘Until recently, mache - also known as lamb's lettuce or corn salad and a longtime staple in France - could be found here mainly in tony restaurants and upscale markets.’
    • ‘In the ensuing days Miller was celebrated in the tony newspapers and magazines as a latter-day Shakespeare.’
    • ‘All these years I lived here, and little did I know how much fun could be had for so little money in a town so famous for its tony ways.’
    • ‘So Allan, how do you explain the relative success at these tony places, all these expensive handbags and lotions and potions and so forth?’
    • ‘When Americans think of British television, they think of ‘quality’ news and tony entertainment shows.’
    • ‘Likewise, locals with tony connections are packing their bags for ranches in Wyoming and mountain aeries in Colorado.’
    • ‘They sent them to tony private schools, as well.’
    • ‘And what does it have to do with tony Monterey County, home of rugged shorelines, exclusive golf clubs and hundreds of acres of lettuce fields?’
    • ‘Fried chicken gets the respect it deserves at his tony restaurant.’
    • ‘A child of the civil rights movement, she attended integrated schools and sends her son to one of Atlanta's tony private academies.’
    • ‘The expected glamour of the leading ladies was complemented by the tony dressing of guests who represented the full cultural mélange that is Houston.’
    • ‘Little Dix Bay, a tony Rosewood resort on Virgin Gorda in the British Virgin Islands, offers WiFi on its beaches.’
    • ‘There's a fear that the valley may grow from a place where people of modest means can live and work into a tony enclave for wealthy second-home owners.’
    • ‘In 1989, they were married in the tony paradise of Hobe Sound, Fla., where the bride's parents had moved after decades of living near Chicago.’
    • ‘A fire hydrant that prevented him and his wife from parking their SUV in front of their tony digs was removed by the city of Boston at his behest.’
    • ‘There is everything in this discount store of literary ambitions, from the obligatory tony commentary to pathetic little passages of smut.’
    • ‘Here, in tony Mount Washington, the residents sometimes complain too, but they seem to secretly like it this way because it adds to the hidden, rural character.’
    stylish, smart, elegant, chic, crisp, dapper, spruce, trim, debonair, well dressed, well groomed, well turned out, smartly dressed
    View synonyms

Origin

Late 19th century: from tone + -y.

Pronunciation:

tony

/ˈtəʊni/