Main definitions of toll in English

: toll1toll2

toll1

noun

  • 1A charge payable to use a bridge or road.

    ‘motorway tolls’
    as modifier ‘a toll bridge’
    • ‘Hauliers believe that enough is already paid by them through road tax and imposing roads tolls is not justified.’
    • ‘Petrol is cheaper but there are a lot of road tolls.’
    • ‘The road tolls are to pay for motorways and town bypasses.’
    • ‘In Singapore, a toll is payable by those who use the roads.’
    • ‘They gave the toll operator some money and waited for her to give them change.’
    • ‘But I'm not saying there will never be tolls on any bridge or road in the country.’
    • ‘Another lesson learned is that it is easier to toll new highways than reinstitute tolls on roads that abandoned them.’
    • ‘In return, the operator can levy a toll upon traffic using the motorway.’
    • ‘Britain's first toll motorway is due to be opened officially by the Transport Secretary today.’
    • ‘If the National Party is sincere about not taxing people more, it should not promote tolls on roads.’
    • ‘Sue gave me two bucks cash so I could pay for the toll bridge.’
    • ‘He stressed the operators will have to fund the operation and continued maintenance of the road for 27 years out of tolls, ensuring the road has a ten year life at the end of the concession period.’
    • ‘The goal of this project is to shift discretionary traffic out of the peak period by reducing the existing tolls on two bridges during the shoulder times before and after the morning and evening rush-hour peaks.’
    • ‘He went on to advocate toll charges on roads and motorways.’
    • ‘Some road companies would ban through traffic justifying it on the basis of increased property values while others would positively welcome it, pocketing the extra income from road tolls.’
    • ‘We are already paying taxes that are too high and now they really want to fleece the drivers by asking them to pay tolls for using the roads.’
    • ‘Nobody should be surprised by the Government's plans for road tolls, but I, for one, have been shocked by the reaction from some quarters of the fleet industry.’
    • ‘Local governments throughout China have increasingly been using tolls on roads and bridges as a means of supplementing their income.’
    • ‘I'm a toll booth operator, it's that simple.’
    • ‘They rode in silence for a little while until they reached a toll bridge.’
    charge, fee, payment, levy, tariff, dues, tax, duty, impost
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1North American A charge for a long-distance telephone call.
      • ‘A lot of its advocates propose that Internet telephony avoids the tolls charged generated from traditional telephone service.’
      • ‘Another complaint is that with conventional long distance toll charges falling, the cost savings are not really significant.’
  • 2in singular The number of deaths or casualties arising from a natural disaster, conflict, accident, etc.

    ‘the toll of dead and injured mounted’
    • ‘People want measures to reduce the toll of accidents, deaths and serious injuries that occur with alarming regularity on the A64.’
    • ‘It is believed some children are still being held - more than 400 have been rescued, but the death and casualty toll varies wildly.’
    • ‘Representatives from the three emergency services, highways officials and county councillors have formed a group to look at ways of reducing the accident toll.’
    • ‘In the meantime, both sides claim battle victories, war reports conflict and contradict and the casualty toll is rising.’
    • ‘The agency called on councils to work with them to introduce safe zones, targeting poor areas where the death and accident toll is even higher.’
    • ‘Police will combine friendly persuasion with hard line law enforcement in a desperate bid to cut the dreadful toll of motorcycle deaths in North Yorkshire.’
    • ‘But with such an attachment to guns, it's hardly surprising there is a constant toll of needless deaths.’
    • ‘In Sri Lanka, the toll stands at 30 882 confirmed dead, the government said.’
    • ‘Rescue workers said because the crash occurred in a densely populated residential area, the casualty toll was likely to be higher than the number of passengers on board.’
    • ‘That adds to the record toll of rail deaths so far this year.’
    • ‘Mr Khan said earlier that the confirmed casualty toll from the earthquake was 39,422 dead and 65,038 injured.’
    • ‘Last year, West Yorkshire recorded a toll of 102 deaths and serious injuries, the lowest number since records began 35 years ago.’
    • ‘However, he insisted that figure was a hypothesis and that the final toll was not expected for several weeks.’
    • ‘The extended hours have been a factor in the large death and accident toll on building sites.’
    • ‘And surely enough the toll climbed during the day and into the night, reaching 189 people missing.’
    • ‘The member's question reminds us of the terrible human toll on all sides when war actually occurs.’
    • ‘The mounting civilian death toll has brought the war home to millions across the Middle East.’
    • ‘The bomb caused the highest casualty toll in mainland Britain since the Manchester bomb in June 1996.’
    • ‘He says he expects the final casualty toll to rise to a huge 20,000.’
    • ‘Residents now put the toll at 44 killed and at least 100 injured.’
    number, count, tally, total, running total, sum total, grand total, sum, score, reckoning, enumeration, register, record, inventory, list, listing, account, roll, roster, index, directory
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1 The adverse effect of something.
      ‘the environmental toll of the policy has been high’
      • ‘Despite their diminutive stature, the world's microchips levy a high toll on the environment.’
      • ‘Thoughts are expressed not as language but through bodily responses, making the physical toll and pain of trauma apparent.’
      • ‘Even those costs shrivel beside the environmental toll.’
      • ‘Providing care for older individuals suffering mental disabilities can exact an enormous psychological toll on family and loved ones.’
      • ‘Suicide among farmers is very high and the toll on the environment from the dramatic change in practices has been huge.’
      • ‘Environmental education is necessary to help students decide if the toll taken on the environment in the name of development is worth the price.’
      • ‘Exacting treatment regimes take a dreadful toll on their bodies and their psychological well-being.’
      • ‘The war and the turbulent years that followed had taken a toll on both his mind and his body.’
      • ‘In addition, chronic alcohol abuse takes a heavier physical toll on women than on men.’
      • ‘Years of warfare and sanctions have taken an enormous toll, with classrooms damaged and looted - and one in four children not going to school at all.’
      • ‘Critics of globalization argue that it marginalizes the majority while exacting too high a toll on the environment.’
      • ‘At the end of life, pain can exact a terrible toll through its direct effect on the patient and the fear it instills in both the patient and the family members.’
      • ‘Tourism brings in 25 percent of Jamaica's gross national product, but it has also taken an environmental toll.’
      • ‘Despite more than 50 years of playing or training virtually every day, football has exacted none of the physical toll suffered by many professional players.’
      • ‘This and many other traumas took an inevitable toll on her after the war, and led her to drink to excess, burst into tirades and complain of depression to her doctor.’
      • ‘It also says the human toll of suffering and health damage must be built into future costings.’
      • ‘And veterans of all ages continue to die at epidemic rates from suicides and other effects of the mental toll their wartime experiences took.’
      • ‘The deeper horror in this book is the relentless nature of trauma and the toll it takes on those who witness its seismic effects.’
      • ‘But even small steps could significantly reduce the toll of corporate crime and violence.’
      • ‘The cumulative effects of so much stress can take a toll on our bodies.’
      adverse effect, adverse effects, undesirable consequence, undesirable consequences, detriment, harm, damage, injury, hurt
      View synonyms

verb

[WITH OBJECT]usually as noun tolling
  • Charge a toll for the use of (a bridge or road)

    ‘the report advocates motorway tolling’
    • ‘If approved, the deal would entail tolling the existing route in exchange for a multi-million rand upgrade and maintenance contract with the consortium partners.’
    • ‘Electronic road tolling and Big Brother are not synonymous’
    • ‘We are in favour of traffic demand management, but we talk about things like congestion tolling and network tolling.’
    • ‘He also concurred with the association's view that tolling the second bridge would result in up to 30% of road users avoiding the bridge so as not to pay the charge.’
    • ‘They are also relaxed about the prospect of tolling the new road.’
    • ‘Some future roads will be tolled but with additional state capital subsidies being provided to make the projects economic for the private sector.’
    • ‘A spokesperson said that no decision had been taken on tolling the new bypass.’
    • ‘What is more environmentally sensitive than congestion tolling?’
    • ‘The concessionaire will be entitled to toll the highway in compliance with the Roads Act.’
    • ‘All expressways in Japan are currently tolled, but are severely congested due to the toll plazas.’
    • ‘I also believe that congestion pricing or tolling on existing roads via electronic ticketing/tagging may need to be considered in the near to medium term future.’
    • ‘He also pointed out that where a road has to be tolled there must be an alternative route available to people who do not want to pay the toll.’
    • ‘The Minister was asked particularly whether the Tauranga Harbour Bridge could be tolled under this proposal.’
    • ‘A Fermoy group has been highly critical of plans to toll the road because it was fearful that charges would drive motorists back into the town.’
    • ‘It is therefore proposed that the road will be tolled, in keeping with the Government's National Development Plan.’
    • ‘We now have three international road funders interested in building, owning and tolling the Eastern Transport Corridor.’
    • ‘They hadn't informed councillors that the road would be tolled, the spokesperson added.’
    • ‘They are looking at tolling existing sections of the national road network in Dublin, Cork, Limerick and Galway in order to raise revenue for the cash-starved, roads building programme.’
    • ‘Every country in the world is getting into road tolling.’
    • ‘Another lesson learned is that it is easier to toll new highways than reinstitute tolls on roads that abandoned them.’

Phrases

  • take its toll (or take a heavy toll)

    • Have an adverse effect.

      ‘years of pumping iron have taken their toll on his body’
      • ‘In 2002, he revealed what had long been suspected: that heavy drinking was taking its toll.’
      • ‘But if the stress of the role is taking its toll, she takes care not to show it.’
      • ‘The flood disaster in southern Africa continues to take its toll, with more heavy rain hindering the relief operation.’
      • ‘The stress of everything took its toll and my health began to deteriorate.’
      • ‘As he gets closer, his burden gets heavier and takes its toll on both his mind and body.’
      • ‘As the two ten minute periods of extra time began it was obvious that the heavy ground was taking its toll on both teams.’
      • ‘The stress and strain of modern life are taking a heavy toll on the human mind.’
      • ‘In the absence of adequate periods of calm, stress can take its toll.’
      • ‘I fear that in the next four years the media and his adversaries will take a heavy toll on him.’
      • ‘Stress took its toll and the weight began to drop off.’

Origin

Old English (denoting a charge, tax, or duty), from medieval Latin toloneum, alteration of late Latin teloneum, from Greek telōnion ‘toll house’, from telos ‘tax’. toll (sense 2 of the noun) (late 19th century) arose from the notion of paying a toll or tribute in human lives (to an adversary or to death).

Pronunciation

toll

/təʊl/

Main definitions of toll in English

: toll1toll2

toll2

verb

  • 1(with reference to a bell) sound or cause to sound with a slow, uniform succession of strokes, as a signal or announcement.

    no object ‘the cathedral bells began to toll for evening service’
    with object ‘the priest began tolling the bell’
    • ‘The church bells began to toll, calling the parishioners to mass.’
    • ‘A bell tolled in the distance, signaling midnight.’
    • ‘The weather invokes a metaphysical sense of coming apocalypse, signaled by the bells that continue to toll throughout.’
    • ‘White smoke poured from the Sistine Chapel and bells tolled earlier to announce the conclave had produced a pope.’
    • ‘And as the bells tolled, so began John's final journey, carried on the military vehicle, escorted by the military band.’
    • ‘He was about to say he'd need time when he heard a distant bell toll twice.’
    • ‘Presently, the Church bell began to toll, signalling that the nightly curfew was about to begin.’
    • ‘Fifteen minutes later the great bell of St. Peter's Basilica began tolling and all the church bells in Rome chimed in, leaving no doubt that a pope had been elected.’
    • ‘He quickly seated himself as a bell tolled, signaling the start of class.’
    • ‘When the church bells began to toll, the girls started to walk through the streets toward the cathedral.’
    • ‘The great 40-ton bell in Liverpool cathedral tolled out our shame and sadness.’
    • ‘Then, it was only after several days of unprecedented rainfall that the flood bells began to toll.’
    • ‘As a train approaches from either direction, two bells on stumpy posts in between the tracks begin to toll in a steady rhythm.’
    • ‘As the preacher crossed himself, the church bell began to toll.’
    • ‘On a day of mourning on both sides of the Atlantic, church bells tolled as millions attended special services to mark a sickening atrocity that has brought the world to the brink of war.’
    • ‘The castle bell began to toll again, deep and pleading.’
    • ‘A bell tolled 215 times in a moving tribute to the victims and their families.’
    • ‘Today the bell will toll for the last time at Chippenham Livestock Market when the final beast goes up for sale.’
    • ‘His dreaming was shattered by the sound of a bell tolling in the distance.’
    • ‘Five minutes later, the bells began to toll, and the crowds began to pack the pavements opposite the church.’
    ring, ring out, chime, chime out, strike, peal, knell
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1with object (of a bell) announce or mark (the time, a service, or a person's death)
      ‘the bell of St Mary's began to toll the curfew’
      • ‘After some moments, the church bells tolled midnight in the distance.’
      • ‘Off in the distance, the University Church bells began to toll the late afternoon hour.’
      • ‘The rising share of foreign businesses in China's delivery market could toll the demise of less prepared domestic carriers’
      • ‘New Year's Eve revellers outside York Minster were taken aback by the sight of a group of youngsters frantically stuffing grapes into their mouths as the bell tolled the start of 2005.’
      • ‘We walked outside, chased by the echo of jingle bells, church bells tolling ten.’
      • ‘The new electronic bells automatically toll the Angelus and peal on the hour.’
      • ‘An appearance on this register would toll the death knell for an architects' career.’
      • ‘From the church of Saint Joseph, at the corner of Cherry and Market streets, I heard a bell tolling the hour.’
      • ‘Some distant bell tolled the hour of Vespers, causing an expression of immense relief to come over Stephen's face.’
      • ‘Livra's words had set a bell tolling the death knell in the king's head.’
      • ‘Noise predicts the orderly passing of life in much the same way church bells toll the hours.’
      • ‘It was joined in chorus by the thunder of the warships' guns pounding the redoubts and the peals of church bells tolling eight o'clock.’
      • ‘High up and near at hand a deep bell sonorously tolled the hour.’
      • ‘Finally just as fashion had contributed to the rise of hairwork, so did it toll its death knell.’
      ring, ring out, chime, chime out, strike, peal, knell
      View synonyms

noun

  • A single ring of a bell.

    ‘she heard the Cambridge School bell utter a single toll’
    • ‘But as a bell's eerie toll floated from within the castle a shiver ran down my spine.’
    • ‘The bell's toll rang through the school, and the crowds of gossiping teenagers slowly dispersed.’
    • ‘It was a beautiful sound, almost like the echo of a bell toll.’
    • ‘Even after he had heard the toll of the bell ring, it took him another full minute to safely retrieve his finger.’
    • ‘An album of cinema-flavoured music, it opens with a single, western-style bell toll.’
    • ‘The days passed slowly, as they had in Ameri, like they were all waiting for that grand breaker, that final bell toll that told them all what the plan was.’
    • ‘He heard the toll of the ship's bell, it was early morning.’
    • ‘Visiting Longhua Temple and listening to 108 bell tolls there on Chinese New Year's Eve has long been an important ceremony for local people to celebrate the grand occasion.’

Origin

Late Middle English: probably a special use of dialect toll ‘drag, pull’.

Pronunciation

toll

/təʊl/