Main definitions of tog in English

: tog1tog2

tog1

noun

togs
informal
  • 1Clothes.

    ‘running togs’
    • ‘The point at which you put summer clothes away and bring out winter togs should be celebrated with some small ceremony.’
    • ‘Gone are cotton loincloths and turbans in favor of microfiber stretch workout togs that wick perspiration away from the body.’
    • ‘He's a young guy, maybe in his twenties, wearing a helmet and the kind of togs I associate with competitive racing.’
    • ‘I quickly slipped out of my togs and under the sheet with some embarrassment.’
    • ‘Around forty-five minutes later she had changed into her smart togs and reappeared for her own set.’
    • ‘I've also got some great pictures of me in my Elizabethan togs which I will scan in today so keep your eye open for some new pictures in the gallery.’
    • ‘So I put on some jogging togs, and got ready to go outside for a 30-minute walk/jog.’
    • ‘Today he sports a particularly vivid mauve cummerbund and a matching beret over his usual black coffee-house togs.’
    • ‘Already in her cycling togs, save for a pair of fuzzy tan slippers, she sits down at the tiny kitchen counter and plows through a slab of French toast.’
    • ‘This is a fun game to raise funds for some deserving causes so bring along your boots, togs and shin guards and join in the fun.’
    • ‘I recommend you all wear your summer togs because you may not get another chance this year!’
    • ‘Winton wasn't ready to see her today, there in his togs and all, dishevelled and exhausted.’
    • ‘We could never emulate that spread when we had one ‘best’ set of clothes, school togs and the cousin's hand-me-down scruffs we mucked around in the rest of the time.’
    • ‘It's definitely time for a closet clear-out and some new togs.’
    • ‘We wandered back to the hotel from the Quayside after midnight, hand in hand and still in our posh togs, while Newcastle celebrated around us.’
    • ‘You look good in winter togs and it's good to see you outside, being a part of the weather you're always talking about.’
    • ‘Once he comes offstage he starts changing into his wedding togs, which look more appropriate for Windsor Castle than Any Town, USA.’
    • ‘The playing surface was a sea of green on Saturday evening and to make matters worse both teams wore togs which were predominantly white.’
    • ‘None of that cash, however, goes on designer togs.’
    • ‘While we would like people to wear the right togs, just because don't shouldn't mean they are excluded.’
    clothing, garments, articles of clothing, articles of dress, attire, garb
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Australian, Irish, NZ A swimming costume.
      • ‘He aims to complete the bid wearing regulation togs, swim hat and goggles.’
      • ‘And plan your next trip out this way - bring a picnic, camera, golf clubs, togs, walking shoes - and in winter, a raincoat just in case!’
      • ‘Beach towels and swimming togs drying on the line were a welcome sight as it signalled the owners were home and available to receive guests.’
      • ‘I even brought my togs today and am hoping to get some lengths done at lunch.’
      • ‘It's not warm enough for people to strip off into swimming togs or bikinis so most men leave on their t-shirts.’
      • ‘Now of course when it comes to pulling on our togs, cozzies, bathers or trunks and swimming competitively, Australians never seem to be too far from the medals.’
      • ‘I had a big tanned U on my back from constantly wearing swimming togs.’
      • ‘After breakfast, they will pack their swimming togs and snorkel gear, and head up north to the Great Barrier Reef.’
      • ‘I should bring my togs and go swimming.’
      • ‘I was a Swamp Thing, lolling around in swimming togs, my skin smeared with chalky white cream and greenish mud.’
      • ‘Jenny and Tanya will need to pack their swimming togs, a towel and a change of clothes.’
      • ‘I chatted her up, supplied her with drinks and food, and after it began to get dark suggested that we change into our swimming togs to get in a little swim.’
      • ‘This was also the perfect time to take out the togs and find out what's in store at the biggest aquatic pool in Paris, Aqua Boulevard.’
      • ‘After changing into my togs I drop into the pool.’
      • ‘They would cross the bridge with towel and togs in hand to go downstream to their swimming hole, a popular place for summer picnics.’
      • ‘You'd go to the Lido, but you haven't got any swimming togs.’
      costume, livery, regalia, habit, suit, dress, garb, attire, ensemble, outfit
      View synonyms

verb

be/get togged up/out
informal
  • Be or get dressed for a particular occasion or activity.

    ‘we got togged up in our glad rags’
    • ‘Training takes place twice a week and there could be up to fifty girls togged out on those evenings.’
    • ‘I got all togged up with goggles, ear plugs, face masks and dirty old clothes for two days floor sanding fun!’
    • ‘Twenty-two girls from Nurney were togged out in the locally sponsored jerseys and new skirts.’
    • ‘Once again, 15 minutes after arrival, they'd togged out and with towel in hands were off down to the pool.’
    • ‘So I got myself togged up in the required fisherman's smock, with those handy pockets for putting things in.’
    • ‘In the end, we had snow, but the flurries were light, and so we togged up and trekked across town back to Betty's.’
    • ‘The sun shone as we togged out in our t-shirts that we put on over several layers of thermal underwear!’
    • ‘Revellers togged up in suits and fancy vintage dresses groove the night away against a projected backdrop of classic films, footage of a bygone Birmingham and, later in the evening, eye-popping burlesque routines.’
    • ‘Our photo shows the lads getting togged out for one of many charity football matches.’
    • ‘Conditions were perfect, the lads stood beside him for the pre-event photos, and he was togged out in the full kit.’
    • ‘I rarely wear a suit these days, often a shirt and tie but rarely the whole hog, but today I was togged out in my full glory.’
    • ‘We've rather over judged the dress code - and appear to be the only ones to have bothered to get togged up at all.’
    • ‘I start getting togged up at 6.50 pm, but there's a vocal warm-up at 6.30 pm and I'm happy to be missing out on that!’
    • ‘They're all big men, though they don't look it when they're togged out.’
    • ‘It was a marvellous feat of organisation and the reward was to see the young people from five years of age to eight togged out in their individual club colours.’
    • ‘Daisy and I had a walk into town, suitably togged up in waterproofs.’
    • ‘It's not dangerous, yet togged up in that gear your average enthusiast looks damned menacing.’
    • ‘Both sides are at the ground a half an hour before the kick off time, togged out, raring to go, and the referee never turns up.’
    • ‘The tournament began at 11 o clock on a grey and wet morning but despite the inclement weather all the teams togged out and started playing.’
    • ‘At any opportunity the kids are togged out in their wellies and off out to the two secured outdoor areas on-site or for a run around outside.’

Origin

Early 18th century (as a slang term for a coat or outer garment): apparently an abbreviation of obsolete criminals' slang togeman ( s) ‘a light cloak’, from French toge or Latin toga (see toga).

Pronunciation

tog

/tɒɡ/

Main definitions of tog in English

: tog1tog2

tog2

noun

British
  • A unit of thermal resistance used to express the insulating properties of clothes and quilts.

    • ‘Sometimes I like winter and the rain: you feel so secure in your bed with your 12 tog blanket.’
    • ‘There's nothing I like more than being warm and cosy under a 2-layered 15 tog quilt.’
    • ‘Society will continue to have a drug problem for as long as we keep our heads well encased in 32 - tog coverlets.’
    • ‘I paid my first visit to a launderette for 21 years today in order to wash the two halves of our 15 - tog 3-year old super-kingsize duvet.’
    • ‘After that, I went off and spent a thousand quid on bedding: three duvets with different tog weights, silk sheets.’
    • ‘I was in bed at 10 pm last night, all snuggled up comfy in my new 14.5 tog duvet.’

Origin

1940s: from tog, on the pattern of an earlier unit called the clo (first element of clothes).

Pronunciation

tog

/tɒɡ/