Definition of today in English:

today

adverb

  • 1On or in the course of this present day.

    ‘she's thirty today’
    ‘he will appear in court today’
    • ‘The man and woman accused of his murder were due to appear before Bradford magistrates today.’
    • ‘He was remanded in custody and is due to appear before Doncaster Youth Court again today.’
    • ‘The two anti-war groups said the plan was to present a legal case to the high court in London today.’
    • ‘The trial is due to start today at Reading Crown Court and is expected to run for four to six weeks.’
    • ‘Even the bright colours of the stained glass in the church windows appeared muted and dull today.’
    • ‘Of course I have forgotten to bring it with me today so you will have to wait.’
    • ‘The bulk of the tumour was removed and he now faces a course of radiotherapy, starting today.’
    • ‘He must surrender his passport by 7pm today and live at an address given to the court.’
    • ‘His case was due to be heard today in the Queen's Bench Division of the High Court in London.’
    • ‘The influx of ordinary fans on to Centre Court today should solve the problem for him.’
    • ‘Her appearance today could also have big repercussions for her own political future.’
    • ‘Three of the men appearing at Kinston Crown Court today were computer consultants.’
    • ‘I don't know what it is but thirty years seem to have rewound off the spool today.’
    • ‘There are two inches of snow on the course and it was snowing and sleeting there today.’
    • ‘The coroner was due to open an inquest into his death today at Burnley Magistrates Court.’
    • ‘This may be a climb down, given the fact that they have had no success in court today.’
    • ‘His case was listed at Bow Street magistrates court today but he was not expected to attend.’
    • ‘It's not just the course our remaining contenders will be battling against today.’
    • ‘In court today, she described seeing a man and a dog stopped on the side of the highway.’
    • ‘A hearing date was going to be set today and I was expecting a fax to arrive today in the court.’
    this day, this very day, before tomorrow, this morning, this afternoon, this evening
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    1. 1.1 At the present period of time; nowadays.
      ‘millions of people in Britain today cannot afford adequate housing’
      • ‘The thought that the course of Nature might change is not the focal concern today.’
      • ‘Yet I am not sure that this distinction was as accepted in the early modern period as it is today.’
      • ‘Most of those we think of today as the great Zen masters came from this period.’
      • ‘Of course, looking at the world today it is sometimes difficult to see much difference.’
      • ‘Yet memory is not as limited, fragile and boring a human talent as it is often thought to be today.’
      • ‘All thinking today seems to be for the current minute rather than the future.’
      • ‘They have kept it alive in the past and continue to make it plausible for millions of people today.’
      • ‘Yep, the day you give thanks for the man who made you the fully rounded fabulous human being you are today.’
      • ‘The most basic of human rights is today under threat as the right to food is sacrificed to the right to trade.’
      • ‘The conventional view today is that the war was an unforgivable waste of human life.’
      • ‘It's a big task, given that only ten per cent of humans have access to the Net today.’
      • ‘Even though they split more than thirty years ago, their influence is still felt today.’
      • ‘At the same time 15 million people today face the threat of famine in the Horn of Africa.’
      • ‘Compare this not just with the world today, but with the whole of human history.’
      • ‘The churches of the New Testament period had just the same problems as we do today.’
      • ‘This was a problem at the time but today few contemporary reds exhibit these old style faults.’
      • ‘Is this really a proportionate response to the biggest threat to human security today?’
      • ‘Many younger people today worry about being forced to work past the current retirement age.’
      • ‘It also threw up a new generation of rank and file leaders whose presence is still felt in the union today.’
      • ‘This lightning detection still goes on today but is now done by machines rather than humans.’
      nowadays, at the present time, these days, in these times, at this time, in this day and age, now, just now, right now, currently, at present, at the present moment, at this moment in time
      View synonyms

noun

  • 1This present day.

    ‘today is a rest day’
    ‘today's match against United’
    • ‘From today a special hotline will enable people to report sightings of the rogue cars.’
    • ‘If you can't remember then maybe you ought to read today's column.’
    • ‘So today's editorials on regional Government did not come as a complete surprise.’
    • ‘So today's meeting is a triumph for all those who have worked so hard behind the scenes to make it happen.’
    • ‘He will check on the Hearts pair in today's match against Livingston at Tynecastle.’
    • ‘We must hope that today's announcement is the first of many heralding hundreds more permanent jobs for York.’
    • ‘The onus is now on Celtic to reclaim the leadership in today's match at Livingston.’
    • ‘More than 50 bands will be playing in two tents over three days from today until Sunday.’
    • ‘But Keighley Town Council has integrated the parade into its umbrella of activities from today until Sunday.’
    • ‘So today's announcement should be seen more as a game of catch-up than of leapfrog.’
    • ‘County board officers from the two sides have been asked to attend today's hearing.’
    • ‘We welcome today's full page announcement of the establishment of the Australian Flag Pole Inspectorate.’
    • ‘I hope today's update and humor at my expense has taught all of you a lesson about drugs.’
    • ‘Before today only invited passengers have been on the train as they operated in tilt mode.’
    • ‘The importance of a proper diet to footballers is widely recognised in today's game.’
    • ‘From today points can be given to a family member and points can be bought once a year to top up.’
    • ‘From today, Scottish police have new powers to get boy racers off the country's roads.’
    • ‘It is games like today's, and those in Europe, where he learns most about his players.’
    • ‘Mark today's date at the left side and the completion date on the right then draw a line between them.’
    • ‘Before today he would have just looked, but now he knew what he was searching for.’
    this day, this very day
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 The present period of time.
      ‘the powerful computers of today’
      ‘today's society’
      • ‘He not only has a great game, he can serve as well - which is very unusual in today's game!’
      • ‘He cut his head on countless occasions and, in today's game, he would have had to go off but he never did.’
      • ‘Acquisition of an integration vendor would seem fair, given today's economic climate.’
      • ‘I can't see the controversy in producing books and literature that reflects today's society.’
      • ‘But what I always defined as safe and as safeguards may not meet today's standards.’
      • ‘He added that he still believes today's young generation could battle for their country like his crew did.’
      • ‘We will have failed to apply the only pressure today's politicians recognise and fear.’
      • ‘We have already mentioned the idea of brand names and what their role is in today's market.’
      • ‘When you use today's computers you are constantly thinking about what you have to do next.’
      • ‘She says today's society is a toxic mix of social and economic pressures which impact negatively on child health.’
      • ‘To be sure, today's middleman does a lot of good, too.’
      • ‘The film is about growing up and being a teen in today's world.’
      • ‘He said today's youth were more depressed than in the past because of building societal pressures.’
      • ‘Evidence suggests that today's more competitive society is affecting the mental health of young people in general.’
      • ‘He was a player who was ahead of his time, and in today's game he would probably still be ahead of his game and his time.’
      • ‘In today's age why should a person be forced by law to pay for a service they may not want?’
      • ‘About the only thing today's heavyweights provide is a headache to those who follow them.’
      • ‘In today's climate, bishops need to reiterate their support for this ministry.’
      • ‘Despite the pace of the game Gerry still believes he could cut it in today's football.’
      • ‘Gibson believes that today's world, and the world of the future, is different.’
      the present, the present day, the present time, now, the here and now, this moment, this time, this period, this age
      View synonyms

Phrases

  • today week

    • A week from today.

Origin

Old English tō dæg ‘on (this) day’. Compare with tomorrow and tonight.

Pronunciation

today

/təˈdeɪ/