Definition of toastmaster in English:

toastmaster

noun

  • A person responsible for proposing toasts, introducing speakers, and making other formal announcements at a large social event.

    • ‘Serving as toastmaster was town crier Trevor Heeks, who was won the town's civic award.’
    • ‘I've really found my niche in life, though, by becoming a toastmaster.’
    • ‘Strangely enough, it is rare for a toastmaster to actually give a toast but our current President, Tony O'Reilly, gave an excellent one in his congratulatory speech to Conor.’
    • ‘There still is a peculiar elusiveness to Kerry that makes it difficult for convention toastmasters to know exactly what to praise.’
    • ‘It is said of Tony O'Reilly that, in his heyday as Ireland's greatest unofficial toastmaster, one of his flunkies would prepare a line or two of biography on each of the people at the functions he was due to attend.’
    • ‘Yet over a four-year period, Watson was employed as a town crier, children's entertainer, and as a toastmaster.’
    • ‘It is alleged that he failed to declare his work as cryer, toastmaster and part-time clown in claims he made for housing benefit, council tax and income support over the last three years.’
    • ‘She wrote fast, she wrote smart, she wrote more or less continuously, and it's a good bet that she got a great deal of pleasure from tossing books off, like a toastmaster tossing off quips.’
    • ‘A professional toastmaster could set you back in excess of £300.’
    • ‘Toasting is a serious and traditionally rich feature of the Georgian meal and an official toastmaster is appointed.’
    • ‘‘The event is part of the first district conference of toastmasters in India and Sri Lanka,’ he says.’
    • ‘This much I know, definitively: The mere fact that a company books a former White House resident as its Christmas toastmaster is no guarantee of its integrity.’
    • ‘The mayor knows the actor's father, Steve, a former mayor's attendant and a popular toastmaster on the local social circuit.’
    • ‘The tamada, or toastmaster, is chosen by the audience, and leads toasts to the native land, to parents, to friends, to the memory of the dead, to women, to life, to children, and to the guests.’
    • ‘All are welcome to come along and watch the toastmasters in action.’
    • ‘Mr Haydon, who has worked as a professional toastmaster all over Europe and America, immediately decided to share his luck by helping a sick child's dream come true.’
    • ‘The toastmasters meet every second Wednesday at Hotel Westport at 8pm.’
    • ‘At our last meeting Bridget Lawlor acted as toastmaster for the night.’
    • ‘In toastmasters you have the opportunity to try both the modern & traditional methods of communicating so that you can get your message across effectively.’
    • ‘Their part-time profession requires them to strike the pose of figures such as trees, gardeners, tennis players and toastmasters, then maintain it absolutely motionless.’

Pronunciation

toastmaster

/ˈtəʊs(t)mɑːstə/