Main definitions of toast in English

: toast1toast2

toast1

noun

  • 1[mass noun] Sliced bread browned on both sides by exposure to radiant heat, such as a grill or fire.

    ‘she buttered a slice of toast’
    [count noun] ‘Stilton and pear toasts’
    • ‘She turned back into the kitchen where she carefully removed a sheet containing golden brown slices of garlic toast from the oven.’
    • ‘They met for breakfast on Margate pier, but when Ramsay asked for toast instead of fried bread his father told him not to be a snob.’
    • ‘Season and spread some lobster mixture on a slice of rye toast.’
    • ‘When you feel better, try small amounts of bland foods, such as toast, applesauce or bananas.’
    • ‘If you can face it, bland foods such as toast or crackers may relieve feelings of nausea.’
    • ‘An hour later I'll probably have a glass of mango juice and two slices of cinnamon raisin toast with thick, chunky English marmalade.’
    • ‘Sara set the plate of eggs and toast in front of her.’
    • ‘The initial oral diet should consist of broth, tea, and toast, with additional foods added as tolerated.’
    • ‘Eat dry foods such as toast, dry cereals and crackers.’
    • ‘I was bringing in a tray full of food (eggs, toast, bacon, etc.) like some maid.’
    • ‘My breakfast is always the same: two pieces of brown toast with slices of banana on top, a cup of tea and an apple juice.’
    • ‘We buttered slices of toast, cut them in mouillettes (the lovely French word for the bread fingers you dip into an egg) and proceeded.’
    • ‘Breakfast is usually hash browns or toast with eggs or a combination thereof; sometimes pancakes, waffles or meat are served.’
    • ‘It was a smooth, rich-tasting Brussels paté, and it spread easily across two slices of toast, which were somewhat on the brown side.’
    • ‘Danish pastries, croissants, toast and warm rolls are on offer, along with fruits, cereals and a full English breakfast, perfect to set you up for the day.’
    • ‘I start with porridge, and then mid-morning I have six egg whites on brown toast.’
    • ‘Maria put some eggs and toast in front of him, and then began to clean up.’
    • ‘Then we excavated the oily marrow with tiny wooden forks, dabbing little bits of it on slices of challah toast.’
    • ‘Take a slice of toast, rub it gently with a garlic clove, and top with a slice of pancetta and a large spoonful of peperonata.’
    • ‘The foie gras was refined almost to the point of innocuousness but layered thinly with confit and smoked goose and served with a slice of very salty toast, which helped to bring it to life, almost.’
  • 2A call to a gathering of people to raise their glasses and drink together in honour of a person or thing, or an instance of drinking in this way.

    ‘he raised his glass in a toast to his son’
    • ‘As the party was breaking up, I raised my glass and made a toast.’
    • ‘She holds forward her glass in a mock toast and finishes her drink with a smile.’
    • ‘Around a hundred guests attended, and the service was followed by a reception with all the usual speeches and champagne toasts to the happy couple.’
    • ‘Lashings of food and drink were laid on and everyone raised a toast to Dave as he blew out the candles on his 40th birthday cake.’
    • ‘Staff were busy refilling glasses as many informal toasts were made toward the two elves sitting closest to the noble on the end.’
    • ‘Charles raised his glass in a toast as the door began to shut.’
    • ‘This week, when you're chinking your champagne glasses and raising a toast to the neighbours who've become good friends, just remember.’
    • ‘An inverted glass is symbolic of the fact that those missing are unable to raise their glasses in a toast.’
    • ‘We started with the rakia, clinking our glasses together for the customary toasts of ‘Nazdrave!’’
    • ‘Over the coming days, I would raise many, many toasts to thank the autumn gods that I was here.’
    • ‘And she raised her wine glass in a toast, everyone else following suit.’
    • ‘Pints were raised, toasts made and car horns worn out as Ireland celebrated this famous victory, this piece of sporting history that will rank alongside the heroics of both 1990 and 1994 in the football annals.’
    • ‘‘We drank toasts to Stalin, Roosevelt, Churchill, and the Studebaker Truck,’ Beyrle recalled.’
    • ‘Roberto cleared his throat and raised his glass for a toast.’
    • ‘Many toasts were raised, and drunk in respect of significance.’
    • ‘The idea of welcoming in the new millennium by standing in the cold outside government buildings without a drink to raise in a toast did not, it seems, appeal to most of the capital's population.’
    • ‘Next to a wild fig tree, the couple raised their glasses in a quiet toast.’
    • ‘I light a candle, pour a glass of wine and offer a toast in her honour.’
    • ‘Propose a worthy toast, raise the goblets to your lips, bury your nose in the mint, inhale a deep breath of its fragrance and sip the nectar of the gods.’
    • ‘The waiter brought over their drinks and Jake clinked his glass to make a toast.’
    tribute, salute, salutation
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1[in singular]A person or thing that is very popular or held in high regard by a particular group of people.
      ‘he found himself the toast of the baseball world’
      • ‘The striker was given a warm reception when he came on midway through the second half, his first appearance for the club in over five months, and by full-time he had become the toast of Ibrox.’
      • ‘Jonathan Caouette's gut-wrenching debut film about his abused mother made him the toast of Cannes - and it only cost $213.’
      • ‘But his career was like a roller-coaster ride, lurching from despair to triumph and back again, before ending up the toast of a new generation.’
      • ‘I'm Plaster of Paris, the toast of Monmartre, I stick to my man until death us do part!’
      • ‘Now, more than 40 years later, he is the toast of entrepreneurs and the hero of his old school - and for good reason.’
      • ‘The year before, he was the toast of the German Film Awards with a film that is only now arriving on video in North America, riding on Lola's fiery red coattails.’
      • ‘Renowned Knockanure writer and poet Dan Keane will be the toast of the Shannonside area next Friday night when a special function will be held in his honour.’
      • ‘Disguised as ‘The brothers Bell’, the girls found publishers and were quickly the talk and the toast of London.’
      • ‘First displayed in 1739, the duck was the toast of Paris.’
      • ‘A decade ago who would have thought that a young Indian American director with the unwieldy name of M. Night Shyamalan would be the toast of Hollywood?’
      • ‘Kirk Douglas, surrounded by the toast of young, snobby elite, was seen at hot Chelsea nightclub Aria.’
      • ‘In addition to speeches before several nonprofit groups, the popular Texan was the toast of a few private gatherings.’
      • ‘Ms. Murthy's literary talents have already been the toast of the town, but one hadn't known of Ms. Premji's interest in the world of words.’
      • ‘Despite the gap in their ages, they became the toast of Atlanta.’
      • ‘Family and friends gathered for a celebration in the family home where Delia was the toast of the party.’
      • ‘She will be the toast of her family when she sails up the River Suir in the tall ship, the Prince William, over the next 24 hours.’
      • ‘Matthew Hoggard was the toast of Yorkshire after routing New Zealand today with career-best figures of seven for 63 in Christchurch.’
      • ‘My memorial to mass death is the toast of the town!’
      • ‘The British director Anthony Minghella was the toast of the Academy in 1996, when his film The English Patient bagged no less than nine Oscars.’
      • ‘They were the toast of the city's film intelligentsia earlier this week when they held a joint book launch for both of their most recent projects.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Cook or brown (food, especially bread or cheese) by exposure to a grill, fire, or other source of radiant heat.

    ‘he sat by the fire and toasted a piece of bread’
    ‘a toasted cheese sandwich’
    • ‘It also has dual gas controls with a full range of temperatures, so you can sear burgers on one side of the grill and gently toast buns on the other, just by adjusting the flame.’
    • ‘He stood at the window watching her, and he made a sandwich for her, toasted bread with tuna, which he knew to be one of her favourites.’
    • ‘When the burgers are done, toast the Kaiser rolls on the grill for 20-30 seconds, and you're done.’
    • ‘While berries cook, lightly toast pound cake until edges are crunchy.’
    • ‘Although chick peas are classic for hummus, any canned bean will convert into a delicious purée for dipping toasted pitta, flat bread or raw vegetables; my own favourite is made from butter beans.’
    • ‘Just grill / toast the bread, then rub with half a clove of garlic, plonk a good spoonful of pesto on top and finish by drizzling with some olive oil.’
    • ‘If you can impassively read about truffled taleggio on toast, tuna melt with paprika or a hot muffaletta while gazing at photographs of gooey cheese slathered over toasted bread, you are far stronger than me.’
    • ‘It's just cheese and toasted bread, but somehow it's an almost sinful delight.’
    • ‘Serve garnished with a sprig of basil and additional Parmesan cheese and toasted pine nuts if desired.’
    • ‘Choosing a different type of bread can vary the taste of simple cheese on toast a lot and usually require no extra preparation other than buying the different bread.’
    • ‘While the mushrooms are cooking, toast the slices of bread.’
    • ‘In desperation I had a toasted ham sandwich in brown bread which was fine, but I should have liked a serviette.’
    • ‘I glared at her while taking a bite of the scrumptious piece of buttered and toasted bread.’
    • ‘Grill or toast the bread until golden brown then place on a board.’
    • ‘Most mornings, we're lucky if we have time to eat a bowl of cereal or toast a slice of bread.’
    • ‘To brown foods or toast bread, cut the bag so that it becomes a flat sheet, not unlike the silicone baking parchment used in restaurants and pastry shops.’
    • ‘From six to eight months you can try offering your baby alternative foods such as finger foods, including soft baby sandwiches, lightly toasted bread or baby biscuits.’
    • ‘I toasted myself a bagel, poured myself some orange juice and sat down across from my mother at the kitchen table.’
    • ‘I think I'll make him a vegetable and cheese omelet with some toasted bread and some of his favorite juice.’
    • ‘Inside is a roaring open fire where bread is toasted and meat grilled, surrounded by tables laid with traditional red and white tablecloths and set with traditional brown ceramic dishes.’
    brown, grill, barbecue, bake, singe, sear
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1[no object](of food) cook or become brown by exposure to radiant heat.
      ‘place under a hot grill until the nuts have toasted’
      • ‘I might do it from time to time since it makes the house smell nice while it's in the oven toasting, but it's too much work to do more often.’
      • ‘You can even watch the bread toasting through the circular viewing window in the side.’
      • ‘After five minutes, check to make sure coconut is toasting evenly: stir if necessary.’
      • ‘Be sure to set a timer, as nuts and seeds toast very fast.’
      • ‘I wake up too early and then I'm kinda into the day and the coffee is on and the toast is toasting.’
      • ‘Our ‘fusion’ lunch started with garlic bread toasted with the acclaimed house special olive oil, which was exceptionally good.’
      • ‘While the bread is toasting, place the garlic cloves on a chopping board, then press down on them hard with the flat side of a large kitchen knife so that they squash slightly and the skin cracks and is easy to peel off.’
      • ‘He used to whack it up to full, thinking that his toast would toast quicker.’
      • ‘He went on to the garage while the bread was toasting, asking me to bring it to him when it was done.’
    2. 1.2Warm (oneself or part of one's body) in front of a fire or other source or heat.
      ‘Tim was toasting his feet by the fire’
      ‘we were spread out on the grass toasting ourselves one hot day’
      • ‘You are toasting in front of an open fire, or snuggled under the duvet.’
      • ‘Yesterday we spent the morning at the beach, where I did my best to avoid ruining my library pallor while Margaret toasted herself.’
      • ‘She also, from a dried up old toad, has transformed herself into a sparkling, magical femme with mysterious fatal charm after toasting herself under the sun for a week.’
      • ‘Later, lounging on the oversized velvet cushions and toasting myself in front of the fire, I felt a lot better about the whole skiing business.’
      • ‘They lounge on a stone island during the day, toasting in the sun.’
      • ‘Something else to remember is that you get a lot of sunlight reflected from the sea, so for a given time you could get twice as much sun than you would get gently toasting yourself on a beach.’
      • ‘A rich tan is unmistakably the hottest summer trend, yet we all know the dangers of toasting ourselves silly to get that sun-drenched look.’
      • ‘Divers disperse about the boat, toasting on the sun deck, snoozing in the shade, chatting to the crew as they fish off the stern with handlines.’
      • ‘I loved to stand facing the fire toasting my front while the cold autumn wind chilled my back.’
      • ‘Of those 8 hours, I spent about 6 in the sun, nicely toasting myself to a nutmeggy shade of… RED.’
      • ‘Two minutes in the cold ocean water was all it had taken for her to realize she preferred toasting on the sand just watching him.’
      • ‘So last Saturday I skated with my friends for nearly 5 hours straight, and then on Sunday I toasted myself under the sun and climbed OUTDOOR the first time in Germany.’
      • ‘There are flowers to watch, a few leaves still wind-dancing in the garden, toes to toast in front of the fire, and thoughts of the future to ponder.’
  • 2Drink to the health or in honour of (someone or something) by raising one's glass together with others.

    ‘happy families toasting each other's health’
    figurative ‘he is toasted by the trade as the outstanding dealer in children's books’
    • ‘A Haworth couple who first met as partners on the dance floor are toasting 60 years of happy marriage.’
    • ‘That's certainly a milestone worth toasting for Italy's $9 billion wine industry, which has traditionally emphasized quantity at the expense of quality.’
    • ‘We were noisily appreciative of this, and spent much time sitting around on Midsummer Common (outside the Fort St George), and toasting Heather's brilliant supportive role.’
    • ‘There was more laughter at that; everyone raised their glasses to toast the couple and Kate returned to her table as Danny gave a brief speech of his own.’
    • ‘A centenary should be about toasting not roasting.’
    • ‘And I said if we sell a million copies, we're all flying back here and toasting with champagne.’
    • ‘Three friends and I began our evening by toasting over a bottle of Tunisian Chateau Mornag 1996.’
    • ‘But rather than toasting to mojitos and flip-flops, let's take a look at what this past summer was really all about, shall we…’
    • ‘In closing, I lift a glass of Mooseberry wine, toasting all involved on the successful completion of another project.’
    • ‘‘We are toasting to me of course,’ Riley said smiling.’
    • ‘Witnesses said the killer struck at around 4am as hundreds of fans were toasting England's Euro 2004 triumph.’
    • ‘He rose his glass for a toast, and the nineteen year-old man picked his up, toasting along with him, their glasses slightly touching each other and giving off a ringing sound.’
    • ‘The writer of the movie gave a speech and toasted all the acting crew.’
    • ‘Around them 200 labourers were paying little attention to the 39 students and 14 staff who were raising a glass and toasting the dawn of a great new seat of learning.’
    • ‘The noise in the dining room was deafening - people arguing, laughing, toasting.’
    • ‘But times change - and today the drinkers who now flock to the pub were raising their glasses to toast its success as the best in Greater Manchester.’
    • ‘I'll certainly join the girls in toasting that - as long, of course, as they're paying.’
    • ‘Now that the yule festivities are over, we can get down to toasting in the New Year.’
    • ‘After reading your column today I just wanted to let you know what you say in Sweden while toasting.’
    • ‘Drinkers will raise their glasses to toast brave children and make their suffering more bearable.’
    pay tribute to, drink the health of, drink to the health of, drink to, salute, honour
    View synonyms

Phrases

  • be toast

    • informal Be or be likely to become finished, defunct, or dead.

      ‘one mistake and you're toast’
      • ‘So in two or three months, most of these candidates are going to be toast.’
      • ‘Having predicted several months ago that Kerry was toast, I should probably avoid any more prognostication.’
      • ‘If he swings and misses, the mystique is gone and his career is toast.’
      • ‘Well, I'm not so good at predictions - I thought Bush was toast three months ago.’
      • ‘And I'm certainly not going to say the guy is toast.’
      • ‘If the Dems roll over on this one, the Constitution is toast.’
      • ‘The moment a mass retailer loses that delicate balance of giving people what they want and steering them to new ideas, and decides its role is to make trends first and foremost, the company is toast.’
      • ‘We first heard about this illegal immigrant, and of course, within a few days, she was toast, if you will, as far as becoming a member of the Bush Cabinet.’
      • ‘This hasn't happened yet, but the kid is toast when it does.’
      • ‘But whether one uses Elliott Waves, put-call ratios, volatility indicators, price-earnings ratios or Fibonacci timeframes, this rally is toast.’
  • have someone on toast

    • informal Be in a position to deal with someone as one wishes.

      ‘the more he thought, the more I knew I had him on toast’
      • ‘If I didn't turn up he would have had you on toast by now!’
      • ‘The leader of our northern neighbor has him on toast.’
      • ‘The Packers, including Kerry, had him on toast.’
      • ‘Glenn McGrath had him on toast for the first two tests of the series before he reverted to No 4 for the final test and scored 65.’

Origin

Late Middle English (as a verb in the sense ‘burn as the sun does, parch’): from Old French toster roast, from Latin torrere parch. The practice of drinking a toast ( toast) goes back to the late 17th century, and originated in naming a lady whose health the company was requested to drink, the idea being that the lady's name flavoured the drink like the pieces of spiced toast that were formerly placed in drinks such as wine.

Pronunciation:

toast

/təʊst/

Main definitions of toast in English

: toast1toast2

toast2

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • (of a DJ) accompany a reggae backing track or music with improvised rhythmic speech.

    • ‘Until recently, the front man performed his signature toasting from the chair-bound perch behind the drum kit.’
    • ‘Later performances took the concept further with U Roy toasting over Tubby's dubs in a manner that obviously pinpoints dub as a key precursor to DJ and rap styles.’
    • ‘She was riding her calypso rhythm and I started toasting, and she was like ‘Yo man, that's tight,’ so she become an Elephant fan as she like how I ride the rhythms.’
    • ‘In 1969, U-Roy cut the first records in the ‘DJ style’, rapping or toasting over pre-existing instrumental tracks.’
    • ‘Over-looking the image problem of Sov reminding many of white boy Snow's toasting on his pop hit Informer, this female chav scum ambassador has already courted column inches in the style press.’

Origin

1970s: perhaps the same word as toast.

Pronunciation:

toast

/təʊst/