Main definitions of titanic in English

: titanic1titanic2

titanic1

adjective

  • Of exceptional strength, size, or power:

    ‘a series of titanic explosions’
    • ‘Tune into gamma rays, and see titanic explosions scattered throughout the universe at a rate of about one per day.’
    • ‘The effects feel appropriate to the on-screen action, so howls and impacts from weaponry seems titanic and massive.’
    • ‘Of all the objects, places, concepts, and titanic forces at play in 2004, the most monumental, influential, and ascendant is surely the blog.’
    • ‘Type II's derive from a supermassive red giant whose core collapses when it runs out of fuel, and then rebounds in a titanic explosion.’
    • ‘The tree was huge, its titanic proportions reminding him of the redwoods that grew in the US, only three times as large.’
    • ‘Now however, her mind was overwhelmed with concern for her father; she'd also felt the titanic bloom of power and the shattering of the barriers.’
    • ‘The titanic strength of the young battlemother was such that she could have been using her palps alone - and had, on several occasions, with much the same effect as a human smashing a mouse.’
    • ‘NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has revealed the aftermath of a titanic explosion that wracked the elliptical galaxy known as NGC 4636.’
    • ‘Famous for his slow tempos and his cultivation of a titanic, monumental style, he was a superlative interpreter of Mozart, Beethoven, Brahms, and Mahler.’
    • ‘Wilson depicted the struggles of African Americans with a lyrical beauty and captured the lives of those who lived on the edges of the society with a dignity that was worthy of the titanic power of any character in Greek drama.’
    • ‘It has been done, and is still being done, by these titanic, extraordinary structures.’
    • ‘Best estimates suggest that this momentous event occurred early in the first half of our titanic struggle with the mighty Faroe Islands.’
    • ‘This year could signal a titanic shift in power in Germany - if these clubs are up to the task.’
    • ‘‘There's something terribly attractive about a titanic explosion, as long as it occurs far enough away,’ Woosley said.’
    • ‘Like shipbuilding or steel-making, the careful planning and building of a national power system is one of those remarkable things, requiring titanic skills, now all but lost.’
    • ‘He literally flew to his student's rescue and with a titanic burst of strength, the ancient Indian pulled Billy from the pit.’
    • ‘This symbolised the titanic battle between the powers of good and evil.’
    • ‘It was a beast of titanic size, standing more than 100 feet tall.’
    • ‘For instance, unless an effective Museum of the Deep comes up, the titanic power of the ocean will again become a fading memory in most people's minds.’
    • ‘There are, though, exceptional talents within the schools and the emergence of one titanic school above them should not be seen as an indication that they are failing Scotland.’
    colossal, gigantic, monumental, massive, enormous, terrific, tremendous, fantastic, towering, immense, vast, cosmic, giant, mammoth, elephantine, gargantuan, prodigious, huge, very large, great, substantial, mighty, herculean, brobdingnagian
    jumbo, bumper, monster, stupendous, humongous, whopping, whopping great, thumping, thumping great, astronomical, mega
    whacking, whacking great, ginormous
    View synonyms

Origin

Mid 17th century (in the sense ‘relating to the sun’): from Greek titanikos, from Titan (see Titan).

Pronunciation:

titanic

/tʌɪˈtanɪk/

Main definitions of titanic in English

: titanic1titanic2

titanic2

adjective

Chemistry
  • Of titanium with a valency of four; of titanium(IV).

    Compare with titanous
    • ‘It has been permitted to form a joint venture for the manufacture of synthetic rutyl and titanic dioxide.’

Origin

Early 19th century: from titanium + -ic.

Pronunciation:

titanic

/tʌɪˈtanɪk/

Main definitions of titanic in English

: titanic1titanic2

Titanic

proper noun

  • A British passenger liner, the largest ship in the world when she was built and supposedly unsinkable, that struck an iceberg in the North Atlantic on her maiden voyage in April 1912 and sank with the loss of 1,490 lives.

Pronunciation:

Titanic

/tʌɪˈtanɪk/