Definition of Titan in English:

Titan

proper noun

  • 1Greek Mythology
    Any of the older gods who preceded the Olympians and were the children of Uranus (Heaven) and Gaia (Earth). Led by Cronus, they overthrew Uranus; Cronus' son, Zeus, then rebelled against his father and eventually defeated the Titans.

    • ‘They survived the war between the Titans and the Olympians and became servants of Zeus.’
    • ‘He was one of the Titans, the children of Gaia and Ouranos, Earth and Sky.’
    • ‘In Greek mythology, he had been torn apart by Titans but was always regenerated, like the vines in spring.’
    • ‘Thrust it down, below the depths of Tartarus, into the lightless prison of the Titans!’
    • ‘The rest of Saturn's moons are named after individual Titans like Enceladus and Mimas.’
    1. 1.1as noun a titan A person or thing of very great strength, intellect, or importance.
      ‘a titan of American industry’
      • ‘This show made it clear that before he became a titan of avant-garde theater, Beck was a painter of force and poetic invention.’
      • ‘Dan has returned from his vacation: rested, refreshed and ready to resume his rightful place as a titan of the blogosphere.’
      • ‘Covering a titan like Bowie is always dangerous, but Jorge rises to the task and manages to make the songs his own.’
      • ‘Where once he was a titan, today he appears to have lost political and personal bearings.’
      • ‘Rather, we give you the handful of interesting links that will, in time, make you a titan of convergence.’
      • ‘Abrams is a titan - you don't run groundbreaking shows by rolling over and toeing the company line.’
      • ‘The charismatic and determined CEO who set out to build a titan has now assumed a defensive posture and is working to keep her creation in one piece.’
      • ‘He saw himself as a titan, a giant among his peers, towering above the rest of the pack.’
      • ‘Some say he is ‘a titan of three-chord classic rock’.’
      • ‘The 1919 winner of the award at the age of 49 was Marcel Proust, a titan in French literature of that age.’
      • ‘If this monstrous juggernaut of metal and circuitry wasn't a titan, he didn't know what was.’
      • ‘Clarke Carlisle, a titan in the Leeds rearguard, cut it out at the expense of a corner, and the tone for what followed was set.’
      • ‘He was a titan on the stage; he was also an outstanding teacher.’
      • ‘Elvis was a titan, a heroic everyman, an emblem of America's true greatness.’
      • ‘The other is a titan of British acting, whose friends include Neil Tennant and Lily Savage.’
      • ‘He was a titan in America's steel, aluminum, and magnesium industries and was even involved in health care.’
      • ‘Once finished, a titan claws its way from the ground and starts off on a tear towards your enemy's town, where it slaughters anything in its path.’
      • ‘The guy is a titan of jazz piano and you couldn't have asked for a greater contrast with this gig.’
      • ‘He is a titan of a man and is the best runner I know apart from Colin Jackson whom I met once.’
      • ‘To get a sense of Powell's post-government marketability, I paid a visit to a titan of that industry, Nels Olson.’
      giant, mammoth, colossus, leviathan, behemoth, titan, brobdingnagian, monstrosity
      View synonyms
  • 2Astronomy
    The largest satellite of Saturn (diameter 5,150 km), the fifteenth closest to the planet, discovered by C. Huygens in 1655. It is unique in having a hazy atmosphere of nitrogen, methane, and oily hydrocarbons.

Pronunciation

Titan

/ˈtʌɪt(ə)n/