Main definitions of tire in English

: tire1tire2

tire1

verb

  • 1Feel or cause to feel in need of rest or sleep.

    no object ‘soon the ascent grew steeper and he began to tire’
    with object ‘the journey had tired her’
    ‘the training tired us out’
    • ‘Rusedski, still feeling the effects of more than three hours work on Friday, began to tire in the third and fourth sets while Murray took his time to get going.’
    • ‘But I began to tire, and I realised that if I rested and trod water, I would undo all the progress I had made.’
    • ‘Stage coach travel was rugged and slow, with long distances being an arduous and tiring journey over primitive roads, subject to delay and often impassible in muddy weather.’
    • ‘Only when Preston's legs began to tire, their persistence and courage finally waning, did Everton break through again.’
    • ‘The little man from Papua New Guinea was the first to sense that Wakefield were beginning to tire and, according to Radlinski, he let his teammates know.’
    • ‘As the players tired, spaces began to open up and there was finally some sense that chances could happen.’
    • ‘After several hard blows from Luken, Xarne's arms began to tire.’
    • ‘Ismay Macdonald and Leanne Cashion enjoyed several fine runs from defence, as the Oxford side began to tire under the barrage of pressure.’
    • ‘As the half wore on Abbeyleix began to tire, they looked disgruntled and they had given their all; it was not to be their day.’
    • ‘An hour later and I was beginning to tire after a long hard day.’
    • ‘Repairing people for a living can be rewarding but it's also is stressful, tiring and sometimes just awful.’
    • ‘Hoggard began to tire slightly but he remained a threat and after being bowled through his ten overs he had the magnificent figures of four for 39.’
    • ‘Bonniconlon at this stage began to tire and with the Belmullet midfield and half back line in top form Belmullet ran out winners.’
    • ‘Scores were getting harder to come by as both sides tightened up their game and Tinnahinch began to tire after their early hectic pace.’
    • ‘As the visitors began to tire Mark Triffitt and Mark Crangle scored to give Osbaldwick a valuable 4-2 win.’
    • ‘With the only substitute available already on they began to tire on the huge, heavy pitch.’
    • ‘The visitors were also tiring and mistakes began to happen.’
    • ‘Nottingham, however, proved unable to match Oxford's stamina, and, as they began to tire, Oxford piled on the pressure.’
    • ‘However, with the Goole forwards tiring, they began to show signs of form.’
    • ‘The teachers have an important role in the protection of children, but they too live in the same difficult, tiring and often very frightening or humiliating situation.’
    exhausting, wearying, fatiguing, enervating, draining, sapping, stressful, wearing, trying, crushing
    become tired, get tired, grow tired, become fatigued, weaken, grow weak, lose one's strength, flag, droop, drop
    fatigue, tire out, wear out, overtire, weary, exhaust, drain, sap, wash out, tax, overtax, enervate, debilitate, enfeeble, jade, incapacitate, devitalize, prostrate
    View synonyms
  • 2tire ofno object Lose interest in; become bored with.

    ‘the media will tire of publicizing every protest’
    ‘the proof of a great story is that people never tire of retelling it’
    • ‘Perhaps voters are tiring of the endless negotiation and finessing which a shared balance of power requires.’
    • ‘One can only feel sorry for the West Virginian tourist board who must now be tiring of seeing everyone portrayed as either a redneck degenerate, or dopey member of the sheriff's department who is unable to save the day!’
    • ‘It is a dance, swirling and whirling until one person tires of it or moves on to a new partner.’
    • ‘Societal pressure, advancing years and tiring of the dating game should not be the reason to take the solemn vows, because it will only lead to problems, especially for any children involved.’
    • ‘I skipped entire chapters, reading slices of sections until I tire of the plot.’
    • ‘He would stay until he started to tire of the solitude, however long that might be.’
    • ‘Also in the mix is Viktor, a crusty auteur who is tiring of glitter-eyed ingénue girlfriends.’
    • ‘Padilla, tiring of this tardiness, threatened to adjourn at 10: 15 if there was no quorum.’
    • ‘The BBC never tires of telling us how passionately it seeks the interest and participation of the public in its political output, particularly the young.’
    • ‘His method of working was to concentrate on a topic until he tired of it, when he would write a book on that topic.’
    • ‘Well it does not seem that people are tiring of you!’
    • ‘Camden council, where I live, never tires of bragging of how it evicts people with rent arrears.’
    • ‘In May, 2000, tiring of the crowded conditions, I took some photographs showing the type of service that customers have to endure.’
    • ‘There's also comfort for those tiring of the glass and aluminium cladding look in commercial buildings.’
    • ‘He joined St Paul's Boys School rowing team in 1993 after tiring of playing cricket, and won the Princess Elizabeth Challenge Cup with them in 1997.’
    • ‘Bart tires of Homer's lack of interest in him and chooses another father from the Bigger Brother program.’
    • ‘The third insurgency seems to be tiring of having all the fighting happening in their backyard, and they are fearful that they will be excluded from the upcoming elections.’
    • ‘But all writer-actors say that until they tire of spending days alone with a computer.’
    • ‘He pressed his lips together until they went white and appeared to be tiring of me quite quickly.’
    • ‘After tiring of her inactivity, she expressed an interest in becoming president of Cavendish, which is 50 kilometres north of Hamilton.’
    1. 2.1with object Exhaust the patience or interest of; bore.
      ‘it tired her that Eddie felt important because he was involved behind the scenes’
      • ‘By the end of the third debate, his nine or 10 stock points had begun to lose their shine, and he began to appear like a weary salesman, tiring both himself and his audience with his spiel.’
      • ‘There's nothing to indicate he's lost stride or that he's tired or bored of his schtick.’
      • ‘The voice was tired and bored, but not impolite.’
      weary, become tired, get tired, become weary, get weary, become fed up, get fed up, become fed to death, get fed to death, become bored, get bored, become satiated, get satiated, become jaded, get jaded, become sick, get sick, become sick to death, get sick to death, sicken
      bore, weary, make someone fed up, sicken, nauseate
      View synonyms

Origin

Old English tēorian ‘fail, come to an end’, also ‘become physically exhausted’, of unknown origin.

Pronunciation

tire

/tʌɪə/

Main definitions of tire in English

: tire1tire2

tire2

noun

Pronunciation

tire

/tʌɪə/