Main definitions of tip in English

: tip1tip2tip3

tip1

noun

  • 1The pointed or rounded end or extremity of something slender or tapering:

    ‘George pressed the tips of his fingers together’
    ‘the northern tip of Scotland’
    • ‘You might even catch a glimpse of the tule elk that live in the reserve at the northern tip of the Point Reyes peninsula.’
    • ‘The belly of the bow should show the growth rings meeting in the middle of the bow as the curve develops, and these should be running steadily out to the tips as the constant taper develops.’
    • ‘Silicon was concentrated in the extreme tips of the needles in all tissues, but particularly in the transfusion tissue, and more so in the Muskoka samples.’
    • ‘Its massively thick silver body often measures more than 2m in length, powerful and muscular, cylindrical in section, and gradually tapering to the tip of the tail.’
    • ‘The Bear's wings are mid-mounted, swept-back, and tapered with blunt tips.’
    • ‘Press the tip of your index finger in the middle of the tie, just below the knot.’
    • ‘A very long, formerly bluish muffler trailed its scraggly ends down his front and back, and the fat, rounded tips of his shoes poked out from beneath his trousers.’
    • ‘The tips of her slender fingers were revealed at the openings of the sleeves, her bare feet small but slim.’
    • ‘Teeth seven through eleven are present, although in none are the extreme distal tips preserved.’
    • ‘Trees are sheared to the shape of an inverted ice cream cone with a wide base and a uniform taper to the tip of the tree.’
    • ‘I pressed the tips of my fingers to my lips and sighed.’
    • ‘These spicules are up to 0.03 mm in diameter and taper to sharp tips.’
    • ‘One euhedral prism with rounded tips and one anhedral grain have been investigated.’
    • ‘The blade however should not taper too much from the tip because an improper taper can cause it to slip out of the screw slot.’
    • ‘Dawn pressed the tip of her index finger against his lips.’
    • ‘The River Niger flows through the country in the extreme south-west, and the northern tip of Lake Chad lies in the extreme south-east.’
    • ‘His ears are wide at the base, tapering gradually to rounded tips.’
    • ‘The plesiosaur limb has a specific shape - it tapers towards its tip to reduce drag, unlike the oar-like shape of the rowing limb.’
    • ‘But my favourite Goan destination lies at the other end of the state, at the extreme northern tip.’
    • ‘Wing hairs tend to split into two to three hairs that are frequently branched near their tips and are more slender than their wild-type counterparts.’
    point, end, extremity, head, sharp end, spike, prong, tine, nib
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A small piece or part fitted to the end of an object:
      ‘the rubber tip of the walking stick’
      • ‘The rubber tip of her bottle hung from her lips, clenched securely between her young baby teeth.’
      • ‘At first glance, it's a cleaning rod with a rubber tip and a funny-looking patch.’
      • ‘Ergonomic rubberized temple tips and nose pads keep them firmly in place.’
      • ‘A rubber tip prevents noise or slipping if used on a hard surface.’
      • ‘He tapped a spot on the map with the rubber tip of his pointer - the synthetic oil refinery at Odertal, Germany.’
      • ‘If the poles are planted with the rubber tip first they are fairly quiet.’
      • ‘The Great Stang has a rubber tip, for use in processionals; however, it has a slip-on point to support it outdoors as well.’
      • ‘This two-piece telescoping staff also has a rubber tip which removes to reveal a steel point used for rough terrain.’
      • ‘A vertical aluminum rod with mounting hardware and black rubber tips at each end holds the construction together.’
      • ‘The cartridge combines a scored full metal nose over an internal rubber tip that collapses on impact.’
      • ‘The rubber ear tips apparently provide excellent protection to the delicate lining of nostrils, when placed over nasal prongs used in oxygen delivery.’
      cap, cover, ferrule
      View synonyms

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1usually as adjective tippedAttach to or cover the end or extremity of:

    ‘mountains tipped with snow’
    [in combination] ‘steel-tipped spears’
    • ‘The most common tools used by farmers were metal tipped ploughs for turning over the soil and harrows to cover up the soil when seeds had been planted.’
    • ‘Forests covered the planet with natural formations of mighty mountains tipped with snow.’
    • ‘So I didn't expect to find fields of chemically tipped missiles.’
    • ‘Colourful piping tipped the edges of flesh toned dresses.’
    • ‘Strung with hemp impregnated with beeswax such a bow could shoot an Ash wood, steel tipped arrow with goose feather flights accurately over a range of 300 yards.’
    • ‘Nectar feeding species are small and have long muzzles and extremely long tongues tipped with a brush-like structure.’
    cap, top, crown, surmount, finish
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Colour (something) at its end or edge:
      ‘velvety red petals tipped with white’
      • ‘The edges of the trees are tipped with orange and red, invoking not only a time of day but also a time of year: late August or early September.’
      • ‘She tipped her eyelashes with red mascara and used her own not permanent hair dye to add red streaks to her hair.’
      • ‘In spring, new leaves are tipped in pink then fade to creamy white.’
      • ‘He had red tipped hair and three piercings in one ear.’
      • ‘Changing into my animal form I run on all four paws as a white wolf with black tipped ears and a stripe going down each cheek.’
      • ‘I still don't like certain sorts of plants much because of the fear of that programme - red tipped slimy looking specimens terrify me!’
      • ‘Somehow I hadn't noticed that his hair was tipped in red.’
  • 2tip a page in(in bookbinding) paste a single page, typically an illustration, to the neighbouring page of a book by a thin line of paste down its inner margin:

    ‘tipped in here is a clipping from a magazine’

Phrases

  • on the tip of one's tongue

    • Almost but not quite brought to mind or spoken:

      ‘his name's on the tip of my tongue!’
      • ‘Blocking refers to those times when you have a word or name on the tip of your tongue, but you just can't recall it.’
      • ‘I've forgotten the name of this liqueur… it's on the tip of my tongue.’
      • ‘Kime scrambled for his name, searching through his mental reserves for the name that lingered on the tip of his tongue.’
      • ‘The name was on the tip of my tongue, I just couldn't remember.’
      • ‘I was vaguely aware of Deo and a name, a word on the tip of my tongue that I couldn't quite say.’
      • ‘Kit stayed silent for a second as though she had had an answer to that question but she couldn't quite remember it or else it was on the tip of her tongue.’
      • ‘There was a line-up of Late Review personalities along one wall, among them several very well-known playwrights whose names remain forever on the tip of your tongue.’
      • ‘She added: ‘The questions sound fairly easy, but the answers might take quite some time as you may feel they are on the tip of your tongue yet they escape you at the critical moment.’’
      • ‘The name was on the tip of her tongue, hanging off the edge.’
      • ‘There are mental equivalents too, like having somebody's name, or a fact, or a song title on the tip of your tongue, but being unable to get it out.’
  • the tip of the iceberg

Origin

Late Middle English: from Old Norse typpi (noun), typpa (verb), typptr tipped; related to top.

Pronunciation

tip

/tɪp/

Main definitions of tip in English

: tip1tip2tip3

tip2

verb

  • 1Overbalance so as to fall or turn over:

    [no object] ‘the hay caught fire when the candle tipped over’
    [with object] ‘a youth sprinted past, tipping over her glass’
    • ‘In a reflexive reaction, Donny jerked sideways, tipping over his chair as he fell into Grandmother.’
    • ‘The trolley tipped onto on its side, sending baby Charlotte crashing to the floor, still strapped in her seat.’
    • ‘Thaddius watched with horror as it tipped itself over, dropping a tiny smudge of clear liquid from a now apparent hole on the marble on Takel's foot.’
    • ‘Jesse just tipped himself backwards into the water, neatly.’
    • ‘He impacts the car at such high speeds, and it tips over on its side.’
    • ‘In at least one seminar, the inevitable happened and she tipped over backwards on to the floor.’
    • ‘A hot wave rushed over the clone and he tipped over, falling onto his side with a groan of pain and aching muscles.’
    • ‘The boat tipped over and I fell into the ponds cold waters.’
    • ‘He looked up at the tall man with curiosity, tipping back his head to view him, nearly tipping over backwards in his effort.’
    • ‘‘I thought the trailer of a truck was tipping over,’ said Mr Ellis.’
    • ‘He stood for a second, his eyes slowly rolling to the back, then tipped over backwards.’
    • ‘I felt horrible when my recycling bin was filled with so much water that I couldn't tip it over to empty it.’
    • ‘Soon, a pile of the creatures had accumulated and the bridge tipped over and she fell in, clinging the way Jackson had done, but there were too many of them.’
    • ‘Damien blinked, falling back into his chair so hard he nearly tipped over.’
    • ‘It tipped over backwards and smashed a frosted window to pieces, one of which glass splinters landed near me.’
    • ‘Each dredge would then be tipped inboard and the scallops emptied by pulling a line over the emptying derrick from the base of the dredge.’
    • ‘The cyclist tipped over and her wallet fell out.’
    • ‘I wince as it collides against her forehead, then jump up as she tips back and falls over backwards, chair and all.’
    • ‘Choose containers that safely fit on your windowsill without tipping over or falling off.’
    • ‘At one point Brendan's sled tipped over and he fell into the snow and no one bothered to help him up.’
    upset, overturn, topple over, turn over, throw over, knock over, push over, knock down, upend, invert, capsize, turn topsy-turvy
    overturn, turn over, overbalance
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Be or cause to be in a sloping position with one end or side higher than the other:
      [with object and adverbial] ‘I tipped my seat back, preparing myself for sleep’
      [no object, with adverbial] ‘the car had tipped to one side’
      • ‘I nodded, wiping my dry mouth on the back of my hand before I bent at the waist to pick up my bag and my text book, tilting my head when it tipped dizzily to the side.’
      • ‘If you find there is too much liquid in the pan from the squid, tip it at an angle over the heat to burn it off.’
      • ‘He wore hats, tipped slightly to the side, he had the easiest laugh of anybody, he was fluent in English and Japanese and spoke to me like a peer.’
      • ‘He had tipped her chin and stared into her sad eyes and in his gaze she found a reciprocating pain that he had hidden behind a playful façade.’
      • ‘So every time I take a serving from the jar, the jar gets tipped on its side so that the contents can pour into my bowl.’
      • ‘The boat had become lodged by the current close to the bridge and was partly trapped under the bridge support, causing the boat to begin to tip on to its side.’
      • ‘She approached his white painted cradle and looked down at him as he lay on his back, his head slightly to the side and tipped down against his chest.’
      • ‘He interrupted her thoughts as he tipped his head a different angle to get another different look of her face against the light.’
      • ‘Double-crested Cormorants have slender, hook-tipped bills that are often tipped up at an angle as they swim.’
      • ‘However, the Jaguar does have the advantage that the rear seat backs can be tipped forward to increase luggage capacity.’
      • ‘Rollovers typically happen when a vehicle blows a tire, hits a bump, or runs off the road onto uneven ground and one side tips up.’
      • ‘Although the seats can be tipped forward to give extra cargo room, they cannot be removed.’
      • ‘They rather resemble high-rise apartment blocks tipped on their sides (all those balconies), with a hull bolted on to the underside.’
      • ‘The right side of my boat tips down at the wrong moment, and there I go!’
      • ‘He touched her chin to tip her face up, then leaned down and gently kissed her.’
      • ‘The little girl he had talked to what seemed like ages ago was standing before him, holding a jug of water tipped at a dangerous angle.’
      • ‘He had not awaken when the car almost tipped upon its side and rolled, and he had not awaken when Lucas and Brooke raised their voices earlier.’
      • ‘If the boat tips to your side, you must raise your blade.’
      • ‘Selwyn looked at her quizzically, his head tipped to one side and his large ears pricked forward as he watched.’
      • ‘The bike would be tipped down so much that your head angle would be super steep and hence handle very quickly and be less stable.’
      lean, tilt, list, slope, camber, bank, slant, incline, pitch, dip, cant, bevel, angle, cock, heel, careen, bend, be at an angle
      View synonyms
  • 2[with object and adverbial of direction] Cause (the contents of a container) to be emptied out by holding it at an angle:

    ‘Sarah tipped the washing-up water down the sink’
    • ‘Rocky nodded and unceremoniously tipped out the contents of the box.’
    • ‘They went through the couple's kitchen cupboards, tipping the contents onto the floor, and ransacked the sitting room.’
    • ‘I tip the contents of the unmarked fired-pottery flask into my mouth and splutter.’
    • ‘When it comes to mulching it's simply a case of tipping out the contents of the grass-box when the lawn is mowed.’
    • ‘Now tip the contents of the pan into a large mixing bowl and add all the remaining ingredients.’
    • ‘The girl thrust the shampoo violently back onto its rack, causing the rest of the contents to tip over onto the floor of the shower with a heavy bang.’
    • ‘When the rigmarole of having a bath was over, the bath had to be emptied, dragging the bath to the back door and tipping the contents out into the yard.’
    • ‘When fixed properly, it will tip the entire contents of the bottle into your throat within 20 seconds, and you won't even feel a thing!’
    • ‘Who cares if the box turns out to contain 80% packaging; wedge it on the window ledge or side table and display it as a box and not with the contents tipped out on a plate.’
    • ‘It is not known whether the oil has leaked into the pond from drains or been tipped into the water deliberately.’
    • ‘He'd been through the ground floor of the house, tipping the contents of my handbag into a flower bed and taking the cash, swiftly going through desk drawers.’
    • ‘I sat down on the bed, and tipped out the contents of the little bag.’
    • ‘The first egg was smooth and warm in his grasp as he briskly cracked it on the metal rim and tipped in the contents.’
    • ‘Then he pulled an large Elastoplast of his left forearm and opening a small plastic film container tipped the contents onto the Elastoplast and stuck it onto an inside page in the paper.’
    • ‘The stomach is spilt open and the contents tipped onto the ground.’
    • ‘He begins to tip the contents out on the bed and finds many things he would have expected.’
    • ‘Now and again, a student is sent over to get another box and tips the contents all over the desks.’
    • ‘In fact, I think it is fair to say that he could fall into a tea cup of water, or at the very least find a way of tipping the contents over his head, within a matter of seconds.’
    • ‘Beds were up turned and cupboards were lying strewn all over the place, their contents tipped out.’
    • ‘Make sure that you show everyone the puffed-up bags before you open them and tip the contents into warm bowls.’
    pour, empty, drain, unload, dump, discharge, jettison, offload, drop, decant
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1it tips down", "it is tipping down, etc.British [no object] Rain heavily.
      • ‘We were told it would be just right, not too hot, but it was bitterly cold for the first two weeks we were there and then when we went to see a wildflower garden it was tipping down with rain.’
      • ‘It's tipping down with rain, Poland are kicking from right to left and Portugal get proceedings underway after Hugh blows his big blue whistle.’
      • ‘It's tipping down with rain at The Riazor and the pitch is perfect for football.’
  • 3[with object] Strike or touch lightly:

    ‘I tipped his hoof with the handle of a knife’
    hit lightly, strike lightly, touch, tap, flick, flip, lob, kiss, brush, pat, nudge
    View synonyms
    1. 3.1[with object and adverbial of direction] Cause (an object) to move somewhere by striking or touching it lightly:
      ‘his twenty-yard shot was tipped over the bar by Nixon’
      • ‘Trevor O'Brien tipped the rebound from the second ‘stop’ over the bar in the 6th minute.’
      • ‘Lee Douglas had the chance but his well struck right-footed shot from the edge of the penalty area was somehow tipped around the post by the athleticism of the keeper.’
      • ‘That duo blocked, tackled, tipped and snigged, caught, lifted and cleared a mountain of ball.’
      • ‘It was an unusual goal, the forward meeting his own rebounded shot - the ball had been tipped onto the crossbar by Craig Hinchcliffe - to head home from close range.’
      • ‘A right-footed shot from the edge of the area was brilliantly tipped around the post by the keeper.’
      hit lightly, strike lightly, touch, tap, flick, flip, lob, kiss, brush, pat, nudge
      View synonyms
  • 4tip offBasketball
    [no object] Put the ball in play by throwing it up between two opponents.

    • ‘The usual teams were picked and Emily quickly gained possession of the ball at tip off.’
    • ‘Well, right before the game, and I mean right before the tip off, I filled out the book and made sure I handed it to Tom, the ref.’

noun

  • 1British A place where rubbish is left:

    ‘a rubbish tip’
    ‘we'll have to take it to the tip’
    • ‘Beggarsdale was in need of a spot of light relief this week, what with fears that the old quarry is about to be turned into a rubbish tip and some pretty dreary weather.’
    • ‘Red-faced environment chiefs today pledged there will be no repeat of the Hampshire scandal which saw tons of recyclable waste dumped in rubbish tips.’
    • ‘Mr Colley said one source would be rubbish tips, where half-used tins could be collected in recycling bins.’
    • ‘Umbrellas are like shopping trolleys - they end up on the side of the road like dead animals, in canals, on rubbish tips etc.’
    • ‘Alas, it's a resource that is as well-catalogued as a rubbish tip and the librarians never seem to be around to help when you need it most.’
    • ‘It's bulk that fills up the rubbish tips, and plastic bottles are the bulkiest component by weight that we have to dispose of.’
    • ‘Shoppers and traders today demanded action to clean up two water features in Basildon town centre which have been reduced to rubbish tips.’
    • ‘The room has a great light fixture, by Artemide, and truly original artwork in the cast of a broken piano that artist Leesa French found in a rubbish tip.’
    • ‘These recycling rubbish tips are being introduced at more convenient locations around the neighbourhood, making it easier for residents to recycle.’
    • ‘There seems to be nowhere other than the tip to take cardboard for recycling, which is not much fun when there's always a long queue.’
    • ‘He said the grounds of his town centre church were treated like a rubbish tip and bottles lobbed at its windows.’
    • ‘The pictures are mostly industrial landscapes like gas works or junk yards and rubbish tips.’
    • ‘Sadly now the road is grid-locked most days, the factory is on the verge of closing, the picturesque view of what used to be a boathouse now appears to be a rubbish tip and no-one cares.’
    • ‘The new bins will mean even more rubbish going to the tip - the items for recycling are initially collected at the site before being taken away to recycling plants.’
    • ‘The new law also applies to petrol pumps, alcohol dispensers, weighbridges, industrial scales, firewood and even rubbish dumped at the tip.’
    • ‘It was once a tip where rubbish was piled nearly 12 feet high - but now the Sun Lane nature reserve has won recognition as an environmental success.’
    • ‘And the wages of workers who do the jobs we try not to think about, in care homes, on rubbish tips or on our streets, are scandalously low.’
    • ‘Computers become obsolete, and wind up on rubbish tips.’
    • ‘So she left home at 16, lived in a tin-hut Delhi slum, foraging for beer bottles she could wash and sell on rubbish tips.’
    • ‘Most residents in the county are proud to keep their homes tidy and know how to have an untidy place by looking at the tip, every day, as we go by!’
    1. 1.1informal A dirty or untidy place:
      ‘your room's an absolute tip!’
      • ‘‘My own kitchen is very small, and, well, an absolute tip.’’
      • ‘The house is an absolute tip with a fridge that makes Old Mother Hubbard look good but there's not much new in that.’
      • ‘Aye, the whole house, it was a real tip, with dirty greasy plates and cups littered all over the place because he somehow couldn't get himself organised tee wash a few things up now and again.’
  • 2Baseball
    A pitched ball that is slightly deflected by the batter.

Phrases

  • tip one's hand

    • informal Reveal one's intentions inadvertently.

      • ‘With regard to any physical evidence, certainly nobody is tipping their hand in this investigation.’
      • ‘He doesn't tip his hand and reveal why he knows, but he tells Clark that he knows the story about his rescue is not quite true.’
      • ‘That Courtney has written a good one without tipping her hand as the creator is what drives us to both critique her morally and misinterpret her critically.’
      • ‘But that will be carefully parsed by all of the economists on Wall Street to see - and if you're familiar with the way that Alan Greenspan speaks, he's almost rarely, rarely tips his hand.’
      • ‘Is the CIA really furious because the French tipped their hand too soon, or did French action save the day?’
      • ‘Both sides wage spirited fights because, up until the moment Bush tips his hand, they assure themselves that the president shares their point of view.’
      • ‘The Brown Act includes a litigation exception, to keep counties, cities and school districts from tipping their hand to their adversaries.’
      • ‘Collecting stories across the political spectrum, he never tips his hand to reveal his views or prejudices.’
      • ‘I should point out that judges have this wonderful habit of sometimes not tipping their hand in the courtroom.’
      • ‘Because criminal authors actively spread their creations, they are cautious about tipping their hand.’
  • tip one's hat (or cap)

    • Raise or touch one's hat or cap as a way of greeting or acknowledging someone:

      ‘the doorman tipped his hat with a smile’
      • ‘Coscarelli tips his hat to Lansdale's concise and ‘cinematic’ style, easing the transposing process, and also to the man's lurid iconography.’
      • ‘With the Daylight Stars behind him, Kofo tips his hat to the highlife and Afro-beat of the Nigerian superstars that preceded him - Fela Kuti, King Sunny Ade and drum lord Babatunde Olatunji.’
      • ‘Kiley tips his hat to those loyal listeners, acknowledging that it's the audience, not the venue, that can make or break any performance.’
      • ‘A few covers are thrown in; Eddie tips his hat to Joe Strummer with a teeth-grinding ‘Know Your Rights’ on the Tokyo set, while CCR's ‘Fortunate Son’ is given a better treatment on the Australian leg.’
      • ‘On our way back to the car, a couple of guys walked by, and one of them, wearing a cowboy hat, tipped his hat - yes he did!’
      • ‘Hopkins tips his hat to the ladies, but mushy love triangle cliches are mercifully avoided: this is a horse race, not lust in the dust.’
      • ‘Robert Mitchum's unforgettable performance as Powell is one forged from the purest vein of evil; even as he tips his hat and drawls a neighbourly greeting, malice wafts off the screen.’
      • ‘With guitar slung over his shoulder, Reeves tips his hat in farewell.’
      • ‘And don't feel shy about tipping your hat to the new office of the public editor.’
      • ‘At the opposite end a dapper gentleman tips his hat and bows to this smiling little lady.’
  • tip (or turn) the scales (or balance)

    • Be the deciding factor; make the critical difference:

      ‘her current form tips the scales in her favour’
      • ‘Another factor that's tipping the scales heavily in the direction of buying new - at least for now - is the attractive tax incentives that are available.’
      • ‘This suggests that other factors may have tipped the balance.’
      • ‘However, three factors eventually tipped the balance in favor of comparatively lenient policies.’
      • ‘This was, probably, the over-riding factor that finally tipped the scales and made him decide to make the trip at last.’
      • ‘According to the squad's mentors, however, there are two factors that tip the balance in favour of the current squad.’
      • ‘If we can turn the suburbs around and make a real difference, that will tip the balance for us in the future.’
      • ‘A large enrolment - of 95 students - for French immersion kindergarten next September was one factor that tipped the balance.’
      • ‘Depending on the extent of the difference in rank, however, other factors can tip the balance.’
      • ‘The factor that would tip the balance for me, however, would be wireless Internet.’
      • ‘That slim difference tips the balance toward the newcomer.’
  • tip (or turn) the scales at

    • Have a weight of (a specified amount):

      ‘the phone tips the scales at only 150 g’
      • ‘Through this regimen of exercise, diet, and sleep, it is not unusual for some wrestlers to weigh more than 150 kilograms, and a few tip the scales at 200 kilograms and higher.’
      • ‘He now tips the scales at perhaps one third of his full adult weight, which makes him something like one fifth of Dolly's massive bulk.’
      • ‘Naomi tipped the scales at 119 kg, while Jo weighed 111 kg.’
      • ‘A month into their challenge, the pair, who between them, tipped the scales at just under half a tonne at their first weigh in, have each already lost nearly a stone.’
      • ‘The girl, to be named Octavia, weighed 5lb 1oz, while her brother, Merlin, tipped the scales at 4lb 10 oz.’
      • ‘He did make the weight and tipped the scales at 121 after being overweight by four pounds the day before.’
      • ‘The Super Black Eagle, tipping the scales at 7.5 pounds, weighs only a few ounces more than its standard 12-gauge counterpart like the M1 Field.’
      • ‘At almost 6-5, Smith gained weight to tip the scales at 217 pounds on Friday morning.’
      • ‘This shaves an impressive 4 oz of weight from the bantamweight pistol, which only tips the scales at 24 oz empty, with the mag.’
      • ‘The six-footer has been lifting weights for five years and tips the scales at 190 pounds.’

Origin

Late Middle English: perhaps of Scandinavian origin, influenced later by tip in the sense ‘touch with a tip or point’. Current senses of the noun date from the mid 19th century.

Pronunciation

tip

/tɪp/

Main definitions of tip in English

: tip1tip2tip3

tip3

noun

  • 1A sum of money given to someone as a reward for a service:

    ‘he never leaves a tip’
    • ‘On the other hand if I don't have the money to leave a tip, I don't sweat over it.’
    • ‘After giving Marcie a nice tip for her excellent service, I proceeded into the station.’
    • ‘Akhana looked at the lodgings and gave the cab driver a good tip for his service.’
    • ‘Dancers pay for the right to perform at Spearmint clubs, earning their money from tips.’
    • ‘Once there, she emptied her front pocket of her tips and the other money she'd taken that day.’
    • ‘But in the case of a bartender there is a much thinner line, it is tempting to reward flirtation and tips with favouritism.’
    • ‘Maybe he thought he'd like some easy money like the tips his friends the airport and hotel staff get?’
    • ‘In the end, everyone realises that they don't in fact have enough spare change to be able to pay the exact amount anyway, so the waitress ends up with a much larger tip than her poor service deserved.’
    • ‘A former agricultural engineer, he makes more money now in tips handing out towels.’
    • ‘However, if you happen to be out with me, just don't expect me to cough up for a tip if the service has been average or lousy.’
    • ‘Much depends upon whether the establishment includes the tip, called Service Charge, in the bill.’
    • ‘Dinah finished counting out her tips and swept the money into her pocket.’
    • ‘The wage includes service charges, tips, incentive payments and commissions.’
    • ‘Certainly in America you will need money for tips very quickly, on arrival for the taxi or coach driver, and then the porter.’
    • ‘I took it and grabbed my wallet, placing the money with a tip at the plate.’
    • ‘French restaurants often add up to 15%, but the waiters will still expect a tip if service has been good.’
    • ‘Sarah handed the boy the money and a generous tip.’
    • ‘He smiled wistfully and we got up leaving money and a tip on the table.’
    • ‘For example, when there's someone at a UK supermarket checkout to pack your groceries for you, it's all part of the service: no tip is expected.’
    • ‘She worked for a local family owned restaurant, so naturally she was making money only in tips.’
    gratuity, baksheesh, bonus, little extra, bit extra, present, gift, reward, inducement
    View synonyms
  • 2A small but useful piece of practical advice:

    ‘handy tips for decorating a small flat’
    • ‘Absolute strangers send me tips on the stock market and ideas for starting a new business that I could run with a laptop computer from my new condo in Hawaii.’
    • ‘This self-help book offers plenty of useful advice and tips which are common sense to all those who enjoy a healthy and positive in-law relationship.’
    • ‘My tip is to pop a couple of pieces of dark chocolate into the gravy to add extra richness.’
    • ‘Practical advice and tips are set out in a straightforward layout, laced with quizzes of self discovery.’
    • ‘It will be packed full of useful advice and tips and should be used as a reference document next to the telephone.’
    • ‘Well, now here are some tips for keeping on top of everything.’
    • ‘A tip for left-handed batters: Your first pitch is going to be a high fastball running away.’
    • ‘Yogi Berra, another Yankee, gave him the most trouble until he got a tip from California pitching coach Marv Grissom.’
    • ‘The annual list of tips is extremely popular, and is featured in newspapers and on radio stations across the province.’
    • ‘You'll find articles, news and product tips covering pregnancy, birth and life with a new baby.’
    • ‘According to his tip, they were intent on detonating a dirty bomb in Boston.’
    • ‘Here is a list of useful tips and advice provided by the Patents Office.’
    • ‘Here are some tips to get the ball rolling and keep communication flowing.’
    • ‘To get you started, the tips below can absolutely help you with the steps of creating that perfect baby shower party for you.’
    • ‘The most important tip is to make absolutely sure that the truck is clean.’
    • ‘They listened to my stories, saw my films, and I also gave them baseball tips.’
    • ‘This is probably one of the best tips anybody can give on saving money at the gas pump.’
    • ‘I would love to see articles that cover simple technology tips that can help small businesses build a strong online presence.’
    • ‘The nutritionist will provide practical advice and helpful tips on how to eat healthily, lose weight, and work more exercise into our already busy lives.’
    • ‘Here are some great tips that come into play when the rubber meets the road.’
    hint, suggestion, piece of advice, word, word of advice, pointer, cue, clue, guideline, recommendation, maxim
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1 A prediction or piece of expert information about the likely winner of a race or contest:
      ‘Barry had a hot tip’
      • ‘My tip for the race was a big disappointment.’
      • ‘There will be tips and predictions from top racing experts ahead of the meeting.’
      • ‘They'll talk a good race and they'll have good runs from time to time, but it's no reason to follow their tips for the next race.’
      • ‘He apparently gave the fake sheikh seven winners out of ten tips, but jockeys and trainers can offer better strike rates than that in their newspaper columns.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Give (someone) a sum of money as a reward for a service:

    [with two objects] ‘I tipped her five dollars’
    [no object] ‘that sort never tip’
    • ‘She dispatched her Jeep from the valet, tipping him with her last three dollars until pay day, and headed home.’
    • ‘The pizza man arrived, I tipped him generously, I offered two slices to a friend and one to a homeless lady in my neighborhood.’
    • ‘I described to the alleged bagpipes man what I'd be wearing the next day, and said I'd tip him some money - but he had to make sure he said g'day to me.’
    • ‘I paid the cabbie, tipping him five dollars in my good mood.’
    • ‘Jess declined the services of Roger and grabbed the suitcases herself, tipping him anyway.’
    • ‘It can be hard enough to know how much to tip waiters, porters, and taxi drivers in the UK.’
    • ‘And the barber cut it a little shorter than I might have thought ideal, but I tipped him fairly well anyway.’
    • ‘Because all of them are poor, they tip her with fake money.’
    • ‘To make the process of tipping him easier, that's why.’
    • ‘She then followed me into the dressing area and hovered until I tipped her.’
    • ‘After she's had enough, she refuses my money and shyly tips me five bucks.’
    • ‘The four of us soon got into the swing of the place, ordering $6 whisky macs and tipping heavily.’
    • ‘A fight erupted after Cheryl was accused by one of the club's female employees of not tipping her after taking a selection of gum and mints from her counter.’
    • ‘The family of the departed is moved to tip her well.’
    • ‘I know you're tipping me, so maybe I have to do this to earn my tip, but gum and lemons, don't leave them in the ashtrays unless they're wrapped up in something.’
    give a tip to, reward, remunerate
    View synonyms
  • 2British Predict as likely to win or achieve something:

    ‘Christine was widely tipped to get the job’
    • ‘The one-time Bristol curate was originally tipped for Merseyside but made it clear that he would turn it down because he had not been on Humberside long enough.’
    • ‘It is more than three weeks since we first heard about Morgan having bought £20,000 of shares in Viglen Technology the day before his paper tipped them.’
    • ‘He was prime minister from 1995 to 1997 during Chirac's first term as president, and is widely tipped as his most likely successor.’
    • ‘But the paper claims he had earlier tipped the winner to its reporters.’
    • ‘The date of county council elections across England, the first Thursday in May, has long been tipped as the most likely date for the poll.’
    • ‘She returns for this homecoming concert to remind us why she is currently one of the folk scene's most hotly tipped new acts, blending tradition with imagination and youthful fervour.’
    • ‘Now you tipped Villa to go down last season and they finished sixth - who's your tip for relegation next year?’
    • ‘By this time she had been tipped to win, but no-one quite predicted how large the margin would be between the winner and the runner-up.’
    • ‘I tipped the Kangaroos to beat Sydney and wasn't overly surprised when Carlton found something extra against arch-rivals Essendon.’
    • ‘Merckx Jnr is tipped by many for a mountain stage win and a place in the top 20 when the race returns to Paris in three weeks.’
    • ‘The band landed a contract with music giant Sony Records and was tipped to achieve mainstream success.’
    • ‘The shares are up by 19.8% since he tipped them as a buy at 420p on August 1.’
    • ‘Her second collection was tipped by the Business Design Centre as the best cutting edge UK business and one of five niche labels to watch by Drapers Record.’
    • ‘Moore won the world youth triple jump crown in 2001 and has been tipped for future success.’
    • ‘A decade on and he is being tipped as this year's likely Wimbledon champion.’
    • ‘The Briton, who had been tipped for a podium finish, could only finish in fifth place in Friday's final.’
    • ‘If anything, this whimsically acoustic five-piece are more likely to be tipped as the next Belle & Sebastian.’
    • ‘But with September 18 being tipped as a likely election date, time is running out.’
    • ‘Earlier, several names, including members of political parties, were tipped as likely candidates for the position.’
    • ‘Then we invited well-known trainer Peter Monteith to pen his first column for Scotland on Sunday and he tipped the winner of the Scottish Grand National in no uncertain terms.’
    predict, back, recommend, think of, expect
    View synonyms
  • 3tip someone offinformal Give someone information in a discreet or confidential way:

    ‘they were arrested after police were tipped off by local residents’
    • ‘An informant tipped me off as to where he was seen last, and I was sure that he would still be there.’
    • ‘But on the leader page, the paper lets the administration off the hook on this one, saying the information passed to the president was insufficient to tip him off about the attacks, and places the blame on the intelligence services.’
    • ‘We wouldn't detect it unless we were tipped off about where to look.’
    • ‘All policemen involved in the incident, including the source who tipped them off, have been under investigation by the Jakarta Police's internal affairs officers.’
    • ‘She had remained out of sight as ordered, until their inside information had tipped her off as to the arrival of the target.’
    • ‘They chat to the local fishermen who tip them off to net snags, and spend long hours poring over the charts.’
    • ‘When Macintosh tells us his snake stories have seen him banned from every dinner table in the land, he tips us off to the ideal way to view his yarns.’
    • ‘So they had this informant befriend me and tip me off that I was being monitored.’
    • ‘The operation, code-named ‘Chameleon’ began on January 15, 2004, when police in Munich were tipped off by Turkish police about a consignment of heroin which was about to be trafficked from Turkey to Western Europe.’
    • ‘Police say they were tipped off to a suspicious package near a parking garage next to the hotel.’
    • ‘After he drove away in his own car, somebody called police and tipped them off.’
    • ‘Or maybe it's just as simple as the fact you don't even have an account with that company which tips you off that this is not a legitimate request for your personal information.’
    • ‘And thanks to David for tipping us off to the fact that Andy and Kevin happened to be in Paris at the same time as us.’
    • ‘One of the locals tips him off about it and he and the lads pile down for a night out.’
    • ‘If her ‘subtle’ clues don't tip you off that she's a plant, you haven't watched much TV.’
    • ‘Like a detective, little clues will tip you off if they are lying to you.’
    • ‘We have a big catchment area, a lot of good young talent at the club already, and I'm sure we will be inundated with people tipping us off about other promising players throughout the country.’
    • ‘Yesterday we were tipped off by a man in the village about a house that had already been searched.’
    • ‘Why are all the examples in the documentation carefully constructed to avoid tipping you off to this behaviour?’
    • ‘However, when a supervisor attempted to disseminate the information to Homeland Security, that tipped us off that something unusual was happening.’
    warn, alert, apprise, give notice, inform, notify, tell, let someone know, make someone aware, give a warning to, give fair warning to, forewarn, put someone on guard, put someone on notice, remind
    raise the alarm, sound the alarm
    put wise
    View synonyms

Phrases

  • tip someone the wink

    • informal Give someone private information.

      • ‘In the old days the uncertainty provided a lucrative source of supplemental income for town-hall bureaucrats who would tip you the wink for a little discreet baksheesh.’
      • ‘Keep tipping me the wink and all will go swimmingly.’
      • ‘But because we have assisted trusts at other clubs in similar situations then we should be able to tip them the wink as to who they should speak to.’
      • ‘‘So even though the Foreign Office will tell you, ‘Oh, we have condemned torture in Uzbekistan’, it doesn't mean anything, because by accepting the intelligence you are tipping them the wink to carry on.’’
      • ‘Later my new friend came into bat and I had been tipped the wink that his sister plays for the England women's team.’

Origin

Early 17th century (in the sense ‘give, hand, pass’): probably from tip.

Pronunciation

tip

/tɪp/