Definition of tight in English:

tight

adjective

  • 1Fixed, fastened, or closed firmly; hard to move, undo, or open.

    ‘she twisted her handkerchief into a tight knot’
    ‘I prised the tight lid off with my knife’
    • ‘He made sure it wasn't too tight to constrict or break the tender shoot.’
    • ‘I fasten my seatbelt as tight as I can get it and close my eyes as we start.’
    • ‘It was tight and hard to pull, but I had gotten used to it; having to practice for so long.’
    • ‘After changing and doing her hair into two tight braids, she opened her closet door.’
    • ‘The reason for the sounds was because a piece of tape was over her mouth so she couldn't cry out for help, and her ankles were tied together in a tight knot.’
    • ‘For increased efficiency, you may have a tendency to fasten your laces very tight.’
    • ‘Just then, there was a short knock and the door swung open to reveal his mother, undoing her tight, business-like bun.’
    • ‘Giving it to Lior, Shumba watched as the guard drew closer to Amenra, her graying blond curls fastened in a tight knot along her gold enclosed neck.’
    • ‘If this is too tight and it's hard to judge all the thermal conditions that could occur, the next step will be to use these forcep tools.’
    • ‘She can't open cans or bottles if the lid is tight, and she's had to give up needlepoint.’
    • ‘They should be tied firmly but not be so tight as to cut off circulation.’
    • ‘He undid all the tight strings of her corset and took out her half-bun, staring lovingly at the rose before putting it on her bed stand.’
    compact, compacted, compressed, dense, hard, unyielding, solid
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1(of clothes or shoes) close-fitting, especially uncomfortably so.
      ‘the dress was too tight for her’
      ‘a tight-fitting top’
      • ‘How could she do her work if she was wearing such tight clothes anyway?’
      • ‘My cousin was slightly overweight, but the fact that she wore such tight clothes anyway made her intimidating.’
      • ‘She dressed in tight clothes and always let her hair down.’
      • ‘Avoid wearing super tight clothes and underwire bras, if necessary.’
      • ‘‘I didn't feel right wearing tight clothes and teaching men at the same time,’ she says.’
      • ‘I like to wear tight clothes because they make me feel good.’
      • ‘Don't wear tight clothing or shoes that can cause pressure and blistering.’
      • ‘Forget, if you can for a moment, her tight little body in that tight little uniform.’
      • ‘I refused to wear tight skirts, waistbands, or uncomfortable shoes.’
      • ‘Like all tight clothes, they can cause indigestion and abdominal pain.’
      • ‘It should be noted that society was only willing to let these girls be heroines if they wore tight clothes and were beautiful.’
      • ‘He was a rebel child, with the long hair and the tight clothes.’
      • ‘Do not wear uncomfortable or tight shoes that rub or cut into your feet.’
      • ‘Never ride in cold weather with tight boots or shoes, nor close-fitting gloves.’
      • ‘It could be, perhaps, that his shoes were too tight.’
      • ‘They were tight and painful and designed only for one thing, only halfway comfortable when she was lying down.’
      • ‘It was a tight, body fitting, top with a pretty two layered laced skirt.’
      • ‘She wore tight clothes, mostly tight shirts, and always had her hand on her hip.’
      • ‘Evans has a pretty face and a body made for tight T-shirts, but he has negligible acting ability.’
      • ‘Also tighten your shoes well and wear tight socks so that they will not come out of the shoes.’
    2. 1.2(of a grip) very firm.
      ‘she released her tight hold on the dog’
      figurative ‘presidential advisers keep a tight grip on domestic policy’
      • ‘This event suggests that they do not have a tight grip on this vital matter.’
      • ‘His grip was tight and ironlike, and he jerked her forward with a cruel air.’
      • ‘Flynn wants to keep a tight grip on the purse strings.’
      • ‘Kathy quickly grabbed a hold of my arm and held a firm, tight grip, leading me into the limousine that awaited us.’
      • ‘He maintained a tight grip on the sword as the force of the blow sent him skidding across the ice.’
      • ‘He reached up and patted her horse with his bandaged hand, careful to keep a tight grip on the reigns with the other as they walked down the broad main street.’
      • ‘Her grip was too tight and I saw her face turn to worry as she examined first my left arm and then my right.’
      • ‘She tried to turn, but the man's grasp on her body was too tight.’
      • ‘Jordan's heart pounded fast as she was caught in the man's tight grip.’
      • ‘He made sure to keep a tight grip on it so he wouldn't leave it behind.’
      • ‘His hands had a tight grip on the steering wheel and his posture was anything but relaxed.’
      • ‘He returned the tight grip causing my gaze to turn up to him.’
      • ‘His grip was tight and firm but it felt loving and soft.’
      • ‘Tye caught Freyen's arm in a tight grip and smirked.’
      • ‘Not only do they survive childbirth and carrying heavy loads, they know how to keep a tight grip on luck, love and happiness.’
      • ‘He clutched the flute in his tanned hand, which was slowly turning white at the knuckles because of his tight grip.’
      • ‘The guard tried to free himself from the tight grip as his face turned a deep shade of red and then went to purple.’
      • ‘Whilst he's not waving ‘the big black stick’ in anger he certainly has a tight grip on it.’
      • ‘He didn't say a word, just led me up the rest of the steps with a tight grip.’
      • ‘There is usually no need to strike, just make sure you have a tight grip on your rod.’
    3. 1.3(of a ship, building, or object) well sealed against something such as water or air.
      [in combination] ‘a light-tight container’
      • ‘This feature is especially helpful in tight homes, where appliances compete for less combustion air.’
      • ‘The bilge pumps may have to run for hours and hours, just dealing with rain driven into a supposedly tight boat.’
      • ‘Composed of foam insulation sandwiched between two sheets of oriented strand board, SIPs create a tight home and save lumber.’
      • ‘Place the larger pastry rectangle over the top, pressing the edges together to seal and form a tight package.’
      • ‘If the house is fairly tight, the simplest route for makeup air to enter the structure is often the unused fireplace chimney.’
      • ‘A tight home can literally use up enough air that the fireplace flue is the only route for a fresh supply of outside air available.’
      • ‘Pigs have died after a ventilation failure in a tight building.’
      • ‘I have been told that the house is too tight, so that there is not enough fresh air getting into it.’
  • 2(of a rope, fabric, or surface) stretched so as to leave no slack; not loose.

    ‘the drawcord pulls tight’
    • ‘I simply held the fabric tight front and back of the presser foot and let the machine do its work.’
    • ‘It was lying loose and not stretched tight when the drawings were made.’
    • ‘They have a pulley attached to their harness which snaps the rope tight and means they are only actually holding about 10 kg, not your whole body weight.’
    • ‘The ropes are stretched tight around the corner posts, to allow for acrobatics from the actual ropes.’
    • ‘Tayler walked over to Andy and used the knife to cut the ropes, Andy flinched because the ropes were so tight.’
    • ‘Quickly, he laced the rope between her legs, one over another, until he was certain the rope was tight enough.’
    • ‘She also threw on a pair of black slacks that stretched tight over her thin legs.’
    • ‘He enclosed gunpowder in a tight fabric wrapping to create the first safety fuse.’
    • ‘Nitrus lifted up the wrappings around his neck and tugged down the tight fabric of a Lycra suit to reveal the bare, very pale skin beneath.’
    • ‘He was certain to make it tight; stretching the material as he did so, and it took a little while longer just to wrap the small item with half of the ace.’
    • ‘She tentatively pulled her hands; the ropes were tight.’
    • ‘A man sat behind a large frame on which a net-like backing had been stretched tight.’
    • ‘He clambers confidently ahead of me, keeping the rope between us tight, stopping at each awkward step to see me safely over.’
    • ‘My arms were almost turning purple, the rope was so tight.’
    • ‘This she tucked into the folds of her sleeves, securing it at a point where the fabric was tight enough against her body.’
    • ‘She tried moving her wrists but the ropes were too tight, even though she was wearing her jean jacket the ropes seemed to cut into her skin.’
    • ‘Her wrists were unmovable because the rope was so tight.’
    • ‘Then, he grasped the rope and pulled as tight as he could.’
    • ‘I struggled against it, but the ropes were bound too tight.’
    • ‘The ropes were too tight, the gag too entangled in his hair, and the music too loud.’
    taut, rigid, stiff, tense, stretched, strained, stressed
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1(of muscles or skin) firm or taut.
      ‘he showed off his tight abs’
      ‘the tight skin on your face may start to sag’
    2. 2.2(of part of the body) feeling painful and constricted as a result of anxiety or illness.
      ‘there was a tight feeling in his gut’
      • ‘Every muscle in his body was tight, and Rion had wondered if he'd frozen like that.’
      • ‘Today I've got the shivers all over my body and a tight band round my forehead.’
      • ‘She was shaking, her body was tight and her eyes were practically bleeding.’
      • ‘There was a tight feeling in her body that she couldn't describe.’
      • ‘The muscles in her legs, arms, and her whole body were tight and tense with the exertion of running and her sopping hair flew wildly out behind her.’
      • ‘The very thought of this makes my throat tight and my eyes water.’
      • ‘The appearance of a tight band around the head or of squeezing pain was significantly associated with muscle tension-type headaches.’
      • ‘She felt her face, the skin was tight and painful under her questing fingers.’
      • ‘When the foreskin becomes trapped behind the corona for a prolonged time, it may form a tight, constricting band of tissue.’
      • ‘A tight, constricting pain was setting on her heart, and it unnerved her more than anything, because she knew what it was.’
      • ‘Ian can barely breathe, his lungs are so heavy and his stomach painfully tight.’
      • ‘Early on after my coma the muscles in my body were incredibly tight.’
      • ‘I felt very uneasy, as if my stomach was tight and tense, yet it was sloshing about and very empty.’
    3. 2.3(of appearance or manner) tense, irritated, or angry.
      ‘she gave him a tight smile’
      • ‘His smile was small and tight, very professional looking.’
      • ‘He talks about them with a tight smile which he has obviously been practising for years.’
      • ‘So she mustered up a tight smile and shook her head.’
      • ‘He gives a tough, tight smile as he contemplates his boyhood self, and you can almost hear the schoolchildren of Glasgow breathe a sigh of relief.’
      • ‘I turned to look at her and she gave me a tight, angry smile.’
      • ‘Adrienne stood with a tight smile plastered on her face.’
      • ‘He consulted his notes for a moment, then gave me a tight little smile.’
      • ‘He chuckles, and my tight smile gets a little more real.’
      • ‘She had a tight little smile and two dimples appeared.’
      • ‘The nurse's mouth is a tight line, barely moving when she speaks.’
      • ‘There is something too controlling about Britney with her tanned shiny skin, tight smile and big forehead.’
      • ‘In his tight, angry face we see a lifetime of struggles and disappointments.’
      • ‘Well, he was slim now, and had acquired, as if through plastic surgery of the will, a tight smile that meant to beguile.’
      • ‘The staff was cagy, but confirmed my suspicion with slight, knowing expressions and small tight smiles of sympathy.’
      • ‘‘It's what I'm used to,’ I said with a tight smile, and I knew my eyes were stone cold.’
      • ‘I trudged into the kitchen where Okja wore a tight perm and a smile.’
      • ‘My daughter would walk slowly to our car, a tight smile glued on her face.’
      • ‘She gave him a tight smile and reached for his hand.’
      • ‘But these are sharp little nods, with tight, bright smiles, that say ‘Fine’.’
      • ‘They entered the warm study to find the Prince standing behind his desk, waiting with a tight and hard expression.’
    4. 2.4(of a rule or form of control) strictly imposed.
      ‘security was tight at yesterday's ceremony’
      • ‘But tight controls on handguns mean that England's murder rate is only one-sixth of America's.’
      • ‘But operating and production costs were kept under tight control, increasing by only 32%.’
      • ‘However, others have reservations about tight rules being put down about redevelopment in Middleton, and Bradford Council has not granted the status.’
      • ‘The tight House of Lords security did not realise the trick that had been played on them.’
      • ‘These solutions may not be appropriate for some countries, especially those with tight rules on frequency usage.’
      • ‘The tight rules were introduced last week in a bid to prevent the foot and mouth hot spot centred around Thirsk spreading across the county and affecting the pig industry of East Yorkshire.’
      • ‘Despite the fact that wages and salaries are by far the biggest element of the NHS budget, there have been tight controls on the pay bill.’
      • ‘And the president has directed that spending be kept under tight controls as well.’
      • ‘Security at Irish airports is tight enough to deal with any attempts to smuggle a handgun on board a plane, Aer Rianta said yesterday.’
      • ‘There are tight rules on the type of properties that qualify for the relief.’
      • ‘Our security at Los Alamos and all our nuclear facilities is very tight now.’
      • ‘Security around the hotel was extremely tight with no-one but those with security clearance getting within the environs of Jessop Street.’
      • ‘The US has since pursued a systematic policy aimed at keeping the UN under tight control.’
      • ‘Access to the quarter is controlled by police barricades, and security at the fenced-off US embassy is very tight.’
      • ‘Security chiefs have decided to impose tight controls to prevent terrorists from slipping into the country.’
      • ‘Security at the church was tight, with scores of young people mobilized to scrutinize arrivals and check their bags and identities.’
      • ‘The peasantry in 1300 were living in a world where land was scarce and opportunities for economic advancement were limited by the tight controls of the landowners.’
      • ‘There's a tight control over what is and is not going out.’
      • ‘They have a place but there should be tight controls to ensure maximum benefit for students and if there is difficulty deciding, consult the students.’
      • ‘Barclays said it was lending prudently and had tight controls in place.’
    5. 2.5(of a written work or form) concise, condensed, or well structured.
      ‘a tight argument’
      • ‘The film is tight, superbly structured and has a great, ambiguous ending.’
      • ‘It's a good, tight, well written speech will lauds us all for showing up.’
      • ‘But those seemingly random gags only work effectively when anchored to strong characters and tight story structures.’
      • ‘But that's a minor flaw given the tight execution of this concise, effective album.’
      • ‘It doesn't have the same really tight structure of part I, but it's more epic and touches on a lot more things.’
      • ‘The guy could convert me to anything, due to his passionate delivery and tight arguments.’
      • ‘It was also necessary to learn how to program incredibly efficiently and write extraordinarily tight code.’
      • ‘The critics are in awe of the play's fast, violent pacing, its tight structure and the humorous Scottish dialect.’
      • ‘I feel this provides the skills to write tight, clear, and concise papers.’
    6. 2.6(of an organization or group of people) disciplined or well coordinated.
      ‘the vocalists are strong and the band is tight’
      • ‘A tight and disciplined band they are driven by the skills of drummer Rob Townsend.’
      • ‘We sand-rakers are a tight group and while we could rake a mean sand pit in ten seconds, we could never throw anything.’
      • ‘Word spread in the Southwest about the Augusta Futurity's tight organization and added prize money.’
      • ‘Again, expect some great music from this tight group.’
      • ‘There is no doubt: years of packing clubs and shaking up the whole continent have made them a tight group of musicians who know exactly what they want.’
      • ‘But, they were really tight together and didn't sound at all like a new or high school group.’
      • ‘With him, Rumsfeld brought a tight group of political appointees who did not inherit the Pentagon in order to pursue business as usual.’
      • ‘‘With Zidane coming back, France will play a tight midfield to allow him to be free and do his own thing,’ he noted.’
      • ‘We wanted a tight group of resource-providers who were in the region.’
      • ‘They have been playing together for 26 years and it shows; very tight, very together.’
      • ‘A mention must also go to the tight five who scrummaged hard all day and were full of running.’
  • 3(of an area or space) having or allowing little room for manoeuvre.

    ‘a tight parking spot’
    ‘it was a tight squeeze in the tiny vestibule’
    • ‘This needle allows the surgeon greater control when placing the suture in tight spaces, such as the vomer area or posterior pharynx.’
    • ‘Be assured, this latest XJ is compact enough to fit into a normal-size garage, and can easily cope with the tight spaces of multi-storey car parks.’
    • ‘This mysterious gene enables men to squeeze into unfeasibly tight spaces.’
    • ‘At one point space was so tight, two classes were even being taught in one room.’
    • ‘Deneb didn't even sleep in a bedroom, as he couldn't stand the room's tight spaces.’
    • ‘Her long legs were going numb already, cramped from the tight space.’
    • ‘That's a lot of potentially dangerous people crammed into a tight space.’
    • ‘But space restrictions at the terminal will force drivers to undertake tricky reversing manoeuvres in and out of tight spaces.’
    • ‘The sliding side doors are ideal when parking in tight spaces and the placement of the handbrake to the right of the driver's seat keeps the floor between the front seats clear.’
    • ‘Triumph engineers believed that women were unable to park or manoeuvre in tight spaces and so the car had to be able to turn on a sixpence.’
    • ‘This is the compact version; versatile, reliable, comfortable and suited to areas where space is tight.’
    • ‘I moved forward as much as the tight space would allow, and, propped on my elbows, pressed my lips against hers, our noses colliding.’
    • ‘Maneuvering within a tight space requires skill on the part of the operator, as well as precise equipment.’
    • ‘The steering is light and makes the Fabia very easy to place and manoeuvre around tight spaces.’
    • ‘Their small size and maneuverability allows them to operate in tight spaces.’
    • ‘Steering is very light and the car is surprisingly flexible; the turning circle is quite tight, making it easy to manoeuvre in tight spaces once you've got used to the size.’
    • ‘It not only helps prevent minor car park knocks, but also helps make light work of manoeuvring in tight spaces.’
    • ‘A laundry room that serves multiple functions is essential when space is tight.’
    • ‘Parking in tight spaces can be just as much of a trial for supermini drivers.’
    • ‘It's just ideal for ‘bringing on’ delicate seedlings where garden space is too tight to allow a proper green house to be built.’
    small, tiny, narrow, compact, poky, limited, restricted, confined, cramped, constricted, uncomfortable, minimal, sparse, inadequate
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    1. 3.1(of a bend, turn, or angle) changing direction sharply; having a short radius.
      ‘the coach failed to negotiate the tight bend’
      • ‘It will go at a fairly leisurely speed of 22.4mph but Mike says there are some fairly tight bends.’
      • ‘‘I had just started the ascent of Angliru and was taking one of the tight bends when my wheel just skidded out from under me,’ he recalled.’
      • ‘Everyone is happy, especially Wilkinson, because he kicked well and finished with six out of seven from a tight angle by a corner post.’
      • ‘A useful escape tactic to a prey is to initiate a turn before predator closure and rely on a tight turn radius for escape.’
      • ‘Marist doubled their advantage on seven minutes with an excellent score from a tight angle courtesy of the lively corner-forward Brendan Kelly.’
      • ‘But he didn't panic and his third effort, from a very tight angle for a left-footed kicker, flew between the posts.’
      • ‘When it's not being screamed around tight bends at full chat, the car is still a rounded prospect.’
      • ‘Gardener has the build to make the most of tight bends and camber of indoor tracks.’
      • ‘These bends were so tight that only short, relatively ineffective nets could be used.’
      • ‘McSherry scored an inspirational point from a tight angle when he was forced to shoot from the right corner.’
      • ‘Two of these were from tight angles on the right.’
      • ‘Time and again I drive around a tight bend to be confronted by a high-speed bike haring towards me on my side of the road, having taken the bend way too wide.’
      • ‘Remember, short, tight turns are essential to controlling your speed on the steeps.’
      • ‘And when Dargo received the ball from Boyd's pass across the face of goal, the tight angle saw him hit the side-netting rather than the back of the net.’
      • ‘They will also be racing on the wider expanses of a course that offers a much fairer test of ability than the tight turns and short straight at the Valley.’
      • ‘His shot, from a tight angle, was parried by Glavey for a corner.’
      • ‘‘It was a great goal, a tight angle and he struck through the ball really well,’ said Levein.’
      • ‘Not even big humps can unsettle the Hydractive suspension which also stops the car rolling severely in tight bends.’
      • ‘I warmed up a bit as I climbed the slopes of Stake Hill where the path joins a wider track and then, shortly after, makes a very tight bend to the left.’
      • ‘The angle was tight and his attempt at a difficult chip landed well wide.’
    2. 3.2(of money or time) limited or restricted.
      ‘David was out of work and money was tight’
      ‘an ability to work to tight deadlines’
      • ‘He knew that her expenses were tight; that she barely had enough money to take care of herself.’
      • ‘As a result money is tight, but everyone's been changing their investment goals this year.’
      • ‘‘We know money is tight, but a contribution would let the veterans know they were remembered,’ said Bob.’
      • ‘Money is tight and the government needs to know where to target its funding.’
      • ‘Adam was getting the feeling that money was tight for her.’
      • ‘The captain of the survey ship was on a tight schedule, so he made note of the readings in his log and then the ship came about and returned to the Empire.’
      • ‘Local authorities say it's because they've been advised by the federal agencies that foot the bill that money is tight.’
      • ‘It was hard at times, like when money was tight, but all in all, he was great.’
      • ‘The main criterion for picking a place to go is money, and money is tight at the moment.’
      • ‘Everything was falling into place but money was tight.’
      • ‘Money was tight; he couldn't afford the trips on his salary as a counselor at St. Petersburg College.’
      • ‘Even on a tight budget, we spent a day falling over on the nursery slopes on Coronet Peak, and another braving the icy rapids of the Shotover River on a raft, both of which were great experiences.’
      • ‘The lack of any guarantee of a useful result makes R and D an expense which is often cut when funds are tight.’
      • ‘Time was tight, and a ship and some free labor were needed.’
      • ‘Many new systems involve longer lead times for delivery that are unacceptable in tight building construction schedules.’
      • ‘If money is tight and restricting you from having the flowers you dream of then why not consider making your own bouquet.’
      • ‘Money is tight all the time and we don't have enough reporters.’
      • ‘Money was so tight that even my mother was working part-time.’
      • ‘Sure, money is tight, but I've already accepted that will always be the case.’
      • ‘But it will take some time, particularly with tech spending so tight.’
  • 4(of a formation or group) closely or densely packed together.

    ‘he levered the bishop out from a tight knot of clerical wives’
    • ‘Derek was soon in formation and gently brought the rare Curtiss into a tight formation for our cover and centerspread.’
    • ‘Behind him, the capital ships were starting to shift, trying in vain to get out of their tight formation.’
    • ‘Meanwhile, the race among the leaders continued to ‘come together in a tight pack,’ Brooks says.’
    • ‘She fell in beside Walter, behind Bill, and smirked gently as she realized they were in a tight formation themselves.’
    • ‘Three Tiger Moths from Luskintyre flew over the parade in tight formation.’
    • ‘They carefully engaged themselves into it, floating in a tight formation.’
    • ‘We stayed together in a tight group as we approached the house.’
    • ‘Tirk pushed the accelerator to the floor, and as he did so, the four motorcycles fell into a tight formation round him.’
    • ‘She ran on to one of the paths, the only way that the trees weren't so packed tight together.’
    • ‘The fighters of Alpha Squadron and Daemon Squadron roared through the void in a tight formation.’
    • ‘Our team is really tight so it's hard, but at the same time everybody is always looking out for the new kids.’
    • ‘If the air was turbulent, maintaining a tight formation was a real chore.’
    • ‘Ten minutes ago two attack helicopters peeled off overhead, circling London in tight formation and I could see police launches on the Thames.’
    • ‘Gophers clump their mounds together in tight groups, and these are flatter and fan-shaped with off-center holes.’
    • ‘They held together and went down the street in tight formation, flanked by cops on all sides.’
    • ‘Botrytis bunch rot is especially severe in grape cultivars with tight, closely packed clusters of fruit.’
    • ‘The air was real smooth and was ideal for tight formation flying.’
    • ‘It spun, out of control, into three of the others which were in tight formation.’
    • ‘Several green creatures were marching by in tight formation.’
    • ‘In the daytime you fly a bit loose so you can help watch for enemy planes instead of concentrating on holding a tight formation.’
    1. 4.1(of a community or other group of people) having close relations; tight-knit.
      ‘New York's tight Orthodox Jewish community’
      ‘the folk were far too tight to let anyone know’
      • ‘Where are the applications for people who live in tight communities of a thousand people and strong local government?’
      • ‘They become a pretty tight group, because they socialise together a lot on the Net.’
      • ‘Can you tell now, Allison, how tight, how close are these two?’
      • ‘With all of this behind, what's next for this tight group of friends over the next few years?’
      • ‘The fans at Victoria Park looked after each other, as they would in any tight community.’
      • ‘This tight community is reflected in the organization and the fans that come out to games.’
      • ‘In the tight mining community where we grew up, everybody is identified by family connections.’
      • ‘Everything that I've heard is, especially in this community, the prison parolees are a fairly tight - knit group.’
      • ‘She's been lucky to work closely with a tight group of artists, meaning that her work is remarkably consistent and remarkably polished.’
      • ‘After World War II, the original incentives to remain a tight community faded away.’
      • ‘We are a tight group and share everything with each other, but I am beginning to wonder if I should rethink sharing my encounters with them.’
      • ‘But generally it was just the local boys, a very tight group, very localized.’
      • ‘For all that has happened to him, he is still the product of his background, still the son of a tight community.’
      • ‘The buildings showed that the Hakka people liked to live together in tight communities.’
      • ‘They are a tight community and they work well together.’
  • 5(of a game or contest) with evenly matched competitors; very close.

    ‘he won in a tight finish’
    • ‘He wants to give his key players more rest, but in tight games his best players need to be on the court as much as possible.’
    • ‘Given injury worries in the Scotland camp this should be a tight game.’
    • ‘After a tight, tense struggle, the Limerick side came from behind to capture the trophy for the second time in three years, and their fourth ever title.’
    • ‘Somewhere between the first and last inning of a tight game, a baserunning play is going to decide it.’
    • ‘The team is set offensively in the outfield, so Lewis most often is used as a defensive replacement late in tight games.’
    • ‘He'll also be a voice of calm in the face of adversity that's sure to come in tight games.’
    • ‘He also pitches to the score, working carefully in tight games and challenging hitters with a big lead.’
    • ‘The Bucs still have one of the league's least-productive offenses, particularly in tight games.’
    • ‘Vick doesn't have a lot of experience in tight games in difficult surroundings.’
    • ‘OK, lets say you're in a tight game and the referee has just made, in your immediate opinion, the worst judgment call you have ever seen.’
    • ‘In what was expected to be a very tight game, the USA and Russia did not disappoint the fans.’
    • ‘I thought it was a tight game, quite competitive, but we maybe just shaded it.’
    • ‘And last season excepted, veteran Robert Horry knows how to produce in tight games and the postseason.’
    • ‘His willingness to handle the scoring burden in tight games was another sign of his maturity.’
    • ‘The White Sox were in a tight race and did not want to play a makeup game in Texas and lose their home field advantage.’
    • ‘San Diego likely didn't make up 30 games on this team, but if Schmidt can't start 30 games than it will be a tight race.’
    • ‘But I'm sure this Saturday will be a tight contest and the first goal could be crucial.’
    • ‘Berard could be the piece the Bruins were missing last season and the offensive boost they need to make the difference during a tight playoff series.’
    • ‘Each of those plays could have made a difference in what at the time was a tight game.’
    • ‘There isn't a quarterback in the league you'd rather have going for you in the fourth quarter of a tight game.’
    close, even, evenly matched, well matched
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  • 6British informal Not willing to spend or give much money; mean.

    ‘he is tight with his money’
    mean, miserly, parsimonious, niggardly, close-fisted, penny-pinching, cheese-paring, penurious, scrooge-like, ungenerous, illiberal, close
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  • 7informal [predicative] Drunk.

    ‘he got tight on brandy’
    intoxicated, inebriated, drunken, befuddled, incapable, tipsy, the worse for drink, under the influence, maudlin
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adverb

  • Very firmly, closely, or tensely.

    ‘he went downstairs, holding tight to the bannisters’
    • ‘Robert felt a pang of guilt and shut his eyes tight.’
    • ‘He shuts his eyes tight, as if trying to quell something terrible.’
    • ‘Tom rubbed his forehead and shut his eyes tight.’
    • ‘He shot a large ball of light and I shut my eyes tight.’
    • ‘I shut my eyes tight and said in the calmest voice I could muster, ‘It's Kathy's.’’
    • ‘But this one made his jaw clench tight and his teeth rattle a bit.’
    • ‘Deirdre cast him one last look, then shut her eyes tight.’
    • ‘Shut your eyes tight and try dancing in absolute darkness, with just the sound of anklets and the music to lead you on.’
    • ‘Silhouette clenched her fists and shut her eyes tight.’
    • ‘Today I did nothing more than shut all the windows tight and sit indoors doing my best to think beautiful thoughts.’
    • ‘He cursed his luck and shut his eyes tight, trying to remain motionless.’
    • ‘The mother of the little girl shut her eyes tight, the tears falling more.’
    • ‘Christopher clenched his jaw and reached out, shutting his eyes tight as he twisted the handle and jerked the door open.’
    • ‘Men would shut their doors tight at night, or leave a dog out to sense this mad Trapper.’
    • ‘He shut his eyes tight and forced himself to complete what he had begun.’
    • ‘I shut my eyes tight, trying to block out the sound, like a beating heart.’
    • ‘What do you see when you jam your eyes shut really tight and rub them?’
    • ‘He shut his eyes tight and shook his head some more.’
    • ‘Trying a desperate attempt to sleep he shut his eyes tight.’
    • ‘I rested my forehead on my knees, shutting my eyes tight.’

Origin

Middle English (in the sense ‘healthy, vigorous’, later ‘firm, solid’): probably an alteration of thight ‘firm, solid’, later ‘close-packed, dense’, of Germanic origin; related to German dicht dense, close.

Pronunciation:

tight

/tʌɪt/