Main definitions of tiddly in English

: tiddly1tiddly2

tiddly1

adjective

British
informal
  • Slightly drunk.

    ‘we were all a little bit tiddly’
    • ‘He broke out the smokes and a bottle of wine, and we spent the rest of the evening ‘apologising’ to him, watching football on French TV until we were very tiddly indeed.’
    • ‘We stayed on the dance floor and I was a bit tiddly by then so didn't mind everyone seeing that my dancing had not improved over the years.’
    • ‘We all got fantastically tiddly on the local brews.’
    • ‘We even managed to squeeze in a bit of a party at the end of our visit when we all went to a saki bar and got tiddly.’
    • ‘It had been a long day, the town hall graduation ceremony, lunch at a restaurant with a French name and a bottle of German wine which had made her almost tiddly.’
    • ‘I came in at 11.30, off the last bus, having been in the pub since I finished work at 4, so slightly tiddly.’
    • ‘After lunch, he would arrive - often somewhat tiddly - at Tatler's offices in Hanover Square, where lately he worked from three until four each afternoon.’
    • ‘I only had a Diamond White and a double Southern Comfort, but I got pretty tiddly.’
    • ‘Oddly enough I found my hotel quite easily last night whilst slightly tiddly, but then got completely lost this morning.’
    • ‘The next step was a moving ceremony before a fetid room of tiddly students.’
    • ‘In my day girlies had a couple of sweet sherries and went home feeling a bit tiddly and dangerous.’
    • ‘This was not the case of the person who seemed to be laughing a lot, inquiring whether that was because they were tiddly or whether they were simply in high spirits.’
    • ‘We shot a lot of video that night, but these clips are from late in the evening, after much of that licorice-flavored liquor had been consumed, and we're both a mite tiddly.’
    • ‘Slightly tiddly, I mentioned my Neil Diamond thing.’
    intoxicated, inebriated, drunken, befuddled, incapable, tipsy, the worse for drink, under the influence, maudlin
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Origin

Mid 19th century (as a noun denoting an alcoholic drink, particularly of spirits): perhaps from slang tiddlywink, denoting an unlicensed public house. The current sense dates from the early 20th century.

Pronunciation:

tiddly

/ˈtɪdli/

Main definitions of tiddly in English

: tiddly1tiddly2

tiddly2

adjective

British
informal
  • Little; tiny.

    ‘a tiddly little pool’
    • ‘‘You're not seriously expecting me to photograph you with that tiddly chubby carp’ she said.’
    • ‘The pixels are sold in squares of 100 to create a tiddly icon.’
    • ‘A decade on, that tiddly quarter-page diagram remains the only technical bit of the magazine.’
    • ‘A whole cheese costs less than lots of tiddly bits but looks vastly more interesting.’
    • ‘It had taken 12 years to complete, yet contained a comparatively tiddly 55,000 biographies.’
    little, small-scale, compact, bijou
    View synonyms

Origin

Mid 19th century: variant of colloquial tiddy, of unknown origin.

Pronunciation:

tiddly

/ˈtɪdli/